xKatiex's Personal Name List

ABIGAIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֲבִיגַיִל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AB-i-gayl(English)
Personal remark: Abigail Margaret
Rating: 62% based on 14 votes
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy", derived from the roots אָב ('av) meaning "father" and גִּיל (gil) meaning "joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.

As an English name, Abigail first became common after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans. The biblical Abigail refers to herself as a servant, and beginning in the 17th century the name became a slang term for a servant, especially after the release of the play The Scornful Lady (1616), which featured a character named Abigail. The name went out of fashion at that point, but it was revived in the 20th century.

ADAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: Адам(Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian) אָדָם(Hebrew) آدم(Arabic) ადამ(Georgian) Ἀδάμ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AD-əm(English) A-DAHN(French) A-dam(German, Polish, Czech, Arabic) A-dahm(Dutch) AH-dam(Swedish) u-DAM(Russian) ah-DAHM(Ukrainian) ə-DHAM(Catalan)
Personal remark: Adam Jacob
Rating: 78% based on 13 votes
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".

According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) meaning "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until they ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. As a result they were expelled from Eden to the lands to the east, where they gave birth the second generation, including Cain, Abel and Seth.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

AIDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən(English)
Personal remark: Aidan James
Rating: 61% based on 11 votes
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable den suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AISLIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ASH-lyən
Personal remark: Aislin Grace
Rating: 55% based on 10 votes
Variant of AISLING.
ALEIDIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare), Flemish, Spanish (Latin American)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Contracted form of ADELEIDIS.
ALEXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀλέξανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dər(English) a-leh-KSAN-du(German) a-lehk-SAHN-dər(Dutch) a-lehk-SAN-dehr(Swedish) A-lehk-san-tehr(Icelandic) AW-lehk-sawn-dehr(Hungarian) A-lehk-san-dehr(Slovak)
Personal remark: nn Alex
Rating: 77% based on 11 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀλέξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

AMELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: ə-MEE-lee-ə(English) ə-MEEL-yə(English) a-MEH-lya(Spanish, Italian) an-MEH-lya(Polish) ah-MAY-lee-ah(Dutch) a-MEH-lee-a(German)
Rating: 73% based on 10 votes
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of both George II and George III. The author Henry Fielding used it for the title character in his novel Amelia (1751). Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.

This name experienced a rise in popularity at the end of the 20th century. It was the most popular name for girls in England and Wales from 2011 to 2015.

ANTHONY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-thə-nee(American English) AN-tə-nee(British English)
Personal remark: no nn
Rating: 86% based on 9 votes
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy Antony and Cleopatra (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ARYA (1)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Persian, Indian, Hindi, Malayalam
Other Scripts: آریا(Persian) आर्य, आर्या(Hindi) ആര്യ, ആര്യാ(Malayalam)
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
From an old Indo-Iranian root meaning "Aryan, noble". In India, this is a transcription of both the masculine form आर्य and the feminine form आर्या. In Iran it is only a masculine name.
ASLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish, Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian
Other Scripts: Аслан(Kazakh, Chechen, Ossetian) Аслъан(Western Circassian) Аслъэн(Eastern Circassian)
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
From Turkic arslan meaning "lion". This was a byname or title borne by several medieval Turkic rulers, including the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan (a byname meaning "brave lion") who drove the Byzantines from Anatolia in the 11th century. The author C. S. Lewis later used the name Aslan for the main protagonist (a lion) in his Chronicles of Narnia series of books, first appearing in 1950.
ATTICUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀττικός(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 76% based on 9 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ἀττικός (Attikos) meaning "from Attica", referring to the region surrounding Athens in Greece. This name was borne by a few notable Greeks from the Roman period (or Romans of Greek background). The author Harper Lee used the name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) for an Alabama lawyer who defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
AURELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Romanian, Italian, Spanish, Polish
Pronounced: ow-REH-lee-a(Latin) ow-REH-lya(Italian, Spanish, Polish)
Personal remark: Aurelia Grace
Rating: 82% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of AURELIUS.
BENJAMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
Other Scripts: בִּנְיָמִין(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BEHN-jə-min(English) BEHN-ZHA-MEHN(French) BEHN-ya-meen(German)
Personal remark: Benjamin Lennox
Rating: 69% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) meaning "son of the south" or "son of the right hand", from the roots בֵּן (ben) meaning "son" and יָמִין (yamin) meaning "right hand, south". Benjamin in the Old Testament was the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oni) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).

As an English name, Benjamin came into general use after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher.

BRENDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, Breton
Pronounced: BREHN-dən(English)
Personal remark: Brendan Michael
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn, which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREHN-ə
Personal remark: Brenna Elise
Rating: 60% based on 7 votes
Possibly a variant of BRENDA or a feminine form of BRENNAN.
BRENNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREHN-ən(English)
Personal remark: Brennan Patrick
Rating: 34% based on 7 votes
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRIDGET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BRIJ-it(English)
Personal remark: Bridget Kathleen
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid meaning "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
CADEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dən
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
Sometimes explained as a derivative of the Irish surname Caden, which is a reduced form of the Irish Gaelic Mac Cadáin meaning "son of Cadán". In actuality, its popularity in America beginning in the 1990s is due to its sound - it shares its fashionable den suffix sound with other popular names like Hayden, Aidan and Braden.
CALEB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Personal remark: Caleb Walker
Rating: 71% based on 11 votes
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CALLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə
Rating: 69% based on 8 votes
From the name of a type of lily, of Latin origin. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek κάλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
CALUM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KAL-əm
Personal remark: Calum Reilley
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAMDEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAM-dən
Personal remark: mn for Jacob
Rating: 34% based on 7 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name, perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).
CAMERON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAM-rən
Personal remark: Cameron Anthony
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-MEE(French) kə-MEEL(English)
Personal remark: nn Cami
Rating: 59% based on 9 votes
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CAOIMHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: KEE-va
Personal remark: Caoimhe Clare
Rating: 61% based on 8 votes
Derived from Gaelic caomh meaning "beautiful, gentle, kind".
CHRISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, English
Pronounced: KRIS-ta(German) KRIS-tə(English)
Personal remark: Christa Michaela
Rating: 66% based on 7 votes
Short form of CHRISTINA.
CHRISTIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Late Roman
Pronounced: kris-tee-AN-ə(English) kris-TYAN-ə(English)
Personal remark: Christiana Marie
Rating: 71% based on 7 votes
Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTOPHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-tə-fər
Personal remark: Christopher Andrew
Rating: 88% based on 8 votes
From the Late Greek name Χριστόφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing CHRIST", derived from Χριστός (Christos) combined with φέρω (phero) meaning "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.

As an English given name, Christopher has been in general use since the 15th century. It became very popular in the second half of the 20th century, reaching the top of the charts for England and Wales in the 1980s, and nearing it in the United States.

In Denmark this name was borne by three kings (their names are usually spelled Christoffer), including the 15th-century Christopher of Bavaria who also ruled Norway and Sweden. Other famous bearers include Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (1451-1506), English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), English architect Christopher Wren (1632-1723) and the fictional character Christopher Robin from A. A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh books.

CIARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-a
Personal remark: Ciara Mae
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of CIAR. Saint Ciara was an Irish nun who established a monastery at Kilkeary in the 7th century.
CLARE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHR, KLAR
Rating: 83% based on 7 votes
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was itself probably derived from Irish clár meaning "plank, level surface".
COLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL
Rating: 63% based on 7 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.
COLIN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish, English
Pronounced: KAHL-in(Scottish, Irish, English) KOL-in(English)
Personal remark: Colin Michael
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COLLEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kah-LEEN
Personal remark: Colleen Elizabeth
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
Derived from the Irish word cailín meaning "girl". It is not commonly used in Ireland itself, but has been used in America since the early 20th century.
COLTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KOL-tən
Personal remark: Colton Andrew
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
From an English surname that was originally from a place name meaning "COLA's town".
CONNOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAHN-ər(English)
Personal remark: Connor Daniel
Rating: 82% based on 9 votes
Variant of CONOR.
DANIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל(Hebrew) Даниел(Bulgarian, Macedonian) Դանիէլ(Armenian) დანიელ(Georgian) Δανιήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAN-yəl(English) dah-nee-EHL(Hebrew) DA-NYEHL(French) DA-nyehl(German) DAH-ni-yəl(Norwegian) DA-nyəl(Danish) DA-nyehl(Polish) DA-ni-yehl(Czech) DA-nee-ehl(Slovak) da-NYEHL(Spanish) du-nee-EHL(European Portuguese) du-nee-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) da-nee-EHL(Romanian)
Personal remark: Daniel Jacob
Rating: 89% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

DAVID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד(Hebrew) Давид(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid(English) da-VEED(Hebrew, Brazilian Portuguese) DA-VEED(French) da-BEEDH(Spanish) du-VEED(European Portuguese) DA-vit(German, Czech) DAH-vid(Swedish, Norwegian) DAH-vit(Dutch) du-VYEET(Russian)
Personal remark: David Anthony
Rating: 87% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Over the last century it has been one of the English-speaking world's most consistently popular names, never leaving the top 30 names for boys in the United States, and reaching the top rank in England and Wales during the 1950s and 60s. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys during the 1970s and 80s.

Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield (1850).

DELIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δηλία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DEE-lee-ə(English) DEHL-ya(Italian, Spanish) DEH-lee-a(Romanian)
Rating: 77% based on 7 votes
Means "of Delos" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Artemis, given because she and her twin brother Apollo were born on the island of Delos. The name appeared in several poems of the 16th and 17th centuries, and it has occasionally been used as a given name since that time.
DYLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: DUL-an(Welsh) DIL-ən(English)
Personal remark: Dylan Nicholas
Rating: 23% based on 6 votes
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series Beverly Hills 90210.

ÉAMONN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EH-mən
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Irish form of EDMUND.
EILEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: ie-LEEN(English) IE-leen(English)
Personal remark: mn for Lauren
Rating: 51% based on 7 votes
Anglicized form of EIBHLÍN. It is also sometimes considered an Irish form of HELEN. It first became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland near the end of the 19th century.
EILIDH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of EILIONOIR, sometimes taken to be a Gaelic form of HELEN.
ELEANOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Personal remark: nn Elly
Rating: 86% based on 8 votes
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Alienòr. Among the name's earliest bearers was the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother. However, there appear to be examples of bearers prior to Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is not clear whether they were in fact Aenors who were retroactively recorded as having the name Eleanor, or whether there is an alternative explanation for the name's origin.

The popularity of the name Eleanor in England during the Middle Ages was due to the fame of Eleanor of Aquitaine, as well as two queens of the following century: Eleanor of Provence, the wife of Henry III, and Eleanor of Castile, the wife of Edward I. More recently, it was borne by first lady Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), the wife of American president Franklin Roosevelt.

ELIJAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-jə(English) i-LIE-zhə(English)
Personal remark: mn for Cadence
Rating: 70% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

ELIZABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
Personal remark: Elizabeth Siobhan
Rating: 94% based on 10 votes
From Ἐλισάβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

Among Christians, this name was originally more common in Eastern Europe. It was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, a daughter of King Andrew II who used her wealth to help the poor. In medieval England it was occasionally used in honour of the saint, though the form Isabel (from Occitan and Spanish) was more common. It has been very popular in England since the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century. In American name statistics (as recorded since 1880) it has never ranked lower than 30, making it the most consistently popular name for girls in the United States.

Besides Elizabeth I, this name has been borne (in various spellings) by many other European royals, including a ruling empress of Russia in the 18th century. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II (1926-) and actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011).

ELLA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə
Personal remark: Ella Lorena
Rating: 87% based on 6 votes
Norman form of the Germanic name Alia, which was a short form of names containing the Germanic element alja meaning "other". It was introduced to England by the Normans and used until the 14th century, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the American singer Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996).
ELLERY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-ree
Personal remark: Ellery Grace
Rating: 27% based on 7 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from the medieval masculine name HILARY.
EMILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-lee
Personal remark: Emily Elizabeth Christine
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

This name was moderately popular through most of the 20th century, and became very popular around the turn of the 21st century. It was the highest ranked name for girls in the United States from 1996 to 2007, attaining similar levels in other English-speaking countries around the same time.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Brontë (1818-1848), known for the novel Wuthering Heights, and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

ERIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: EHR-in(English)
Personal remark: mn for Siobhan/Sinead/Caiomhe
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.
ERIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἔρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-is(English)
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Means "strife" in Greek. In Greek mythology Eris was the goddess of discord. She was the sister and companion of Ares.
ETHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֵיתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-thən(English) EH-TAN(French)
Personal remark: Ethan Patrick
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.

After the Protestant Reformation it was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world, and it became somewhat common in America due to the fame of the revolutionary Ethan Allen (1738-1789). It only became popular towards the end of the 20th century. It is the name of the main character in Edith Wharton's novel Ethan Frome (1911), about a man in love with his wife's cousin.

EVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: EHV-ən(English)
Personal remark: Evan Daniel
Rating: 79% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.
EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV(English)
Personal remark: Eve Julia/Julia Eve
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century, with the latter being more common.

GAGE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GAYJ
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book Pet Sematary (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
GARRETT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-it, GEHR-it
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
GEMMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: JEHM-ma(Italian) ZHEHM-mə(Catalan) JEHM-ə(English) KHEH-mah(Dutch)
Personal remark: Gemma Maria
Rating: 57% based on 7 votes
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Γιάννα(Greek)
Pronounced: JAN-na(Italian) YA-na(Greek)
Personal remark: Gianna Alessa
Rating: 87% based on 6 votes
Italian short form of GIOVANNA and a Modern Greek variant of IOANNA.
GLYNIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Either a variant of GLENYS or an elaboration of the Welsh word glyn meaning "valley".
GRACE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAYS
Personal remark: Grace Anne
Rating: 90% based on 6 votes
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.
GRANT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GRANT(English)
Personal remark: Grant William
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
From an English and Scottish surname that was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
GREGORY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GREHG-ə-ree
Personal remark: Gregory Charles
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγόριος (Gregorios), derived from γρήγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory the Illuminator (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.

Due to the renown of the saints by this name, Gregory (in various spellings) has remained common in the Christian world through the Middle Ages and to the present day. It has been used in England since the 12th century. A famous bearer from the modern era was American actor Gregory Peck (1916-2003).

HARPER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-pər
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
From an Old English surname that originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird.
IRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Finnish, Georgian
Other Scripts: Ирина(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian) ირინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: i-RYEE-nə(Russian) EE-ree-nah(Finnish)
Personal remark: Irina Margareta
Rating: 72% based on 6 votes
Form of IRENE in several languages.
ISAIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְשַׁעְיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ie-ZAY-ə(American English) ie-ZIE-ə(British English)
Personal remark: Isaiah Matthew
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name יְשַׁעְיָהוּ (Yesha'yahu) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation", from the roots יָשַׁע (yasha') meaning "to save" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. Isaiah is one of the four major prophets of the Old Testament, supposedly the author of the Book of Isaiah. He was from Jerusalem and probably lived in the 8th century BC, at a time when Assyria threatened the Kingdom of Judah. As an English Christian name, Isaiah was first used after the Protestant Reformation.
JACK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Personal remark: nn for John
Rating: 64% based on 8 votes
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN [1]. There could be some early influence from the unrelated French name JACQUES [2]. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.

American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by the actor Jack Nicholson (1937-) and the golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940-). Apart from Nicklaus, none of these famous bearers were given the name Jack at birth.

In the United Kingdom this form has been bestowed more frequently than John since the 1990s, being the most popular name for boys from 1996 to 2008.

JACOB
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-kəb(English) YA-kawp(Dutch) YAH-kawp(Swedish, Norwegian) YAH-kob(Danish)
Personal remark: Jacob Ryan
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
From the Latin Iacob, which was from the Greek Ἰακώβ (Iakob), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of the Latin New Testament form Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. In America, although already moderately common, it steadily grew in popularity from the early 1970s to the end of the 1990s, becoming the top ranked name from 1999 to 2012.

A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of Grimm's Fairy Tales.

JACQUELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: ZHAK-LEEN(French) JAK-ə-lin(English) JAK-wə-lin(English) JAK-ə-leen(English)
Personal remark: Jacqueline Marie
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.
JANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JAN-ə
Personal remark: Jannah Renee
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Variant of JANNA, influenced by HANNAH.
JENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Finnish
Pronounced: JEHN-ə(English) YEHN-nah(Finnish)
Personal remark: Jenna Rose
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Variant of JENNY. Use of the name was popularized in the 1980s by the character Jenna Wade on the television series Dallas [1].
JENNICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JEHN-i-kə
Personal remark: Jennica Lynn
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
Combination of JENNIFER and JESSICA.
JESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHS-ə
Personal remark: Jessa Laine
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of JESSICA.
JESSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHS-ee(English) YEH-sə(Dutch) YEHS-seh(Finnish)
Personal remark: Jesse Charles
Rating: 78% based on 6 votes
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai), which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
JOELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jo-EHL-ə
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of JOEL.
JOSEPH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹסֵף(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-səf(English) ZHO-ZEHF(French) YO-zehf(German)
Personal remark: nn Joe(y)
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ἰωσήφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add", from the root יָסַף (yasaf). In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.

In the Middle Ages, Joseph was a common Jewish name, being less frequent among Christians. In the late Middle Ages Saint Joseph became more highly revered, and the name became popular in Spain and Italy. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation. In the United States it has stayed within the top 25 names for boys since 1880, making it one of the most enduringly popular names of this era.

This name was borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Portugal. Other notable bearers include the founder of Mormonism Joseph Smith (1805-1844), Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin (1878-1953).

JOSHUA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHSH-oo-ə(English)
Personal remark: Joshua Parker
Rating: 70% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation", from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and יָשַׁע (yasha') meaning "to save". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.

The name Jesus comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

JOSIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יֹאשִׁיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jo-SIE-ə(English)
Personal remark: Josiah Evan
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Yoshiyahu) meaning "YAHWEH supports". In the Old Testament this is the name of a king of Judah famous for his religious reforms. He was killed fighting the Egyptians at Megiddo in the 7th century BC. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
JULIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Other Scripts: Юлия(Russian) Юлія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ə(English) YOO-lya(German, Danish, Polish) YOO-lee-ah(Swedish, Finnish) KHOO-lya(Spanish) YOO-lyi-yə(Russian) YOO-lee-a(Latin)
Personal remark: Julia Eve
Rating: 77% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).

It has been common as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the 18th century. A famous modern bearer is American actress Julia Roberts (1967-).

KAT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAT
Personal remark: nn for Katherine
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Croatian
Pronounced: KAYT(English)
Personal remark: Alannah Kate
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of KATHERINE, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy Taming of the Shrew (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).
KATHERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin, KATH-rin
Personal remark: mn for Siobhan/Katherine Eve
Rating: 80% based on 7 votes
From the Greek name Αἰκατερίνη (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from an earlier Greek name Ἑκατερινη (Hekaterine), itself from ἑκάτερος (hekateros) meaning "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess HECATE; it could be related to Greek αἰκία (aikia) meaning "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". In the early Christian era it became associated with Greek καθαρός (katharos) meaning "pure", and the Latin spelling was changed from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this.

The name was borne by a semi-legendary 4th-century saint and martyr from Alexandria who was tortured on a spiked wheel. The saint was initially venerated in Syria, and returning crusaders introduced the name to Western Europe. It has been common in England since the 12th century in many different spellings, with Katherine and Catherine becoming standard in the later Middle Ages. To this day both spellings are regularly used in the English-speaking world. In the United States the spelling Katherine has been more popular since 1973.

Famous bearers of the name include Catherine of Siena, a 14th-century mystic, and Catherine de' Medici, a 16th-century French queen. It was also borne by three of Henry VIII's wives, including Katherine of Aragon, and by two empresses of Russia, including Catherine the Great.

KEELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEE-lee
Personal remark: Keely Grace
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe meaning "descendant of Caoladhe". The given name Caoladhe is derived from the Gaelic word caol "slender".
KEIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEER-ə
Personal remark: Keira Mary
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Variant of CIARA (1). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).
KELLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHL-ee
Personal remark: Kelley Jean
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Variant of KELLY.
KENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of KENNETH.
KERRY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHR-ee
Personal remark: Kerry Anne
Rating: 15% based on 6 votes
From the name of the Irish county, called Ciarraí in Irish Gaelic, which means "CIAR's people".
KIRSTEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian, English
Pronounced: KEER-stehn(Danish) KHEESH-tehn(Norwegian) KUR-stən(English)
Rating: 33% based on 6 votes
Danish and Norwegian form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian
Pronounced: KRIS-ta(German) KRIS-tə(English) KREES-tah(Finnish)
Personal remark: Krista Mary
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Short form of KRISTINA.
KYLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KIE-lər
Personal remark: Kyler James
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Probably a variant of KYLE, blending it with TYLER. It also coincides with the rare surname Kyler, an Anglicized form of Dutch Cuyler, which is of uncertain meaning.
KYLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
Personal remark: Kylie Grace
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).
LAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Estonian
Pronounced: LIE-neh
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Means "wave" in Estonian.
LANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Лана(Russian, Serbian)
Pronounced: LAH-nə(English)
Personal remark: Lana Kate
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).
LAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LAWR-ə(English) LOW-ra(Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch) LOW-ru(Portuguese) LOW-rə(Catalan) LOW-rah(Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) LAW-oo-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. Famous bearers include Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812, and Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957), an American author who wrote the Little House on the Prairie series of novels.

LAUREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-ən
Personal remark: Lauren Nicole
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
Variant or feminine form of LAURENCE (1). Originally a masculine name, it was first popularized as a feminine name by actress Betty Jean Perske (1924-), who used Lauren Bacall as her stage name.
LAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى(Arabic)
Pronounced: LIE-la(Arabic) LAY-lə(English)
Personal remark: Layla In'am
Rating: 33% based on 6 votes
Means "night" in Arabic. Layla was the love interest of the poet Qays (called Majnun) in an old Arab tale, notably retold by the 12th-century Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi in his poem Layla and Majnun. This story was a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song Layla by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
LENNOX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: LEHN-əks
Personal remark: mn fo Aidan/Benjamin
Rating: 23% based on 6 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Personal remark: Lily Elizabeth Christine
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LORENA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian
Pronounced: lo-REH-na(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Romanian form of LORRAINE.
LUCAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Latin)
Personal remark: Lucas Matthew
Rating: 82% based on 9 votes
Latin form of Greek Λουκᾶς (see LUKE), as well as the form used in several other languages.
LUCIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-SYEHN
Personal remark: Lucienne Aveline
Rating: 73% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of LUCIEN.
LUKE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: LOOK(English)
Personal remark: Luke Michael
Rating: 73% based on 6 votes
English form of Latin Lucas, from the Greek name Λουκᾶς (Loukas) meaning "from Lucania", Lucania being a region in southern Italy (of uncertain meaning). Luke was a doctor who travelled in the company of the apostle Paul. According to tradition, he was the author of the third gospel and Acts in the New Testament. He was probably of Greek ethnicity. He is considered a saint by many Christian denominations.

Due to the saint's renown, the name became common in the Christian world (in various spellings). As an English name, Luke has been in use since the 12th century alongside the Latin form Lucas. A famous fictional bearer was the hero Luke Skywalker from the Star Wars movies, beginning in 1977.

MAEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: MAYV(Irish)
Personal remark: Maeve Anne
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
MAIRENN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Personal remark: Mairenn Caiomhe
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Variant of MÁIRÍN.
MÀIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: MA-ree
Personal remark: Mairi Siobhan
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Scottish form of MARY.
MALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: ma-LEE-a
Personal remark: Malia Anne
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Hawaiian form of MARIA.
MARCELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mar-CHEHL-la(Italian)
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of MARCELLUS.
MARCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MAR-ko(Italian, Spanish, German) MAR-koo(European Portuguese) MAKH-koo(Brazilian Portuguese) MAHR-ko(Dutch)
Personal remark: Marco Andrei
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Italian form of Marcus (see MARK). During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
MARGARET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Personal remark: mn for Siobhan/Niahm/Sinead/Lindsay
Rating: 83% based on 6 votes
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαρίτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", a word that was probably ultimately a borrowing from an Indo-Iranian language. Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

As an English name it has been very popular since the Middle Ages. It was the top name for girls in England and Wales in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, but it declined in the latter half of the 20th century.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of Gone with the Wind, and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-). Others include American anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978) and British prime minister Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013).

MARIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ma-RYEHL-la
Personal remark: Mariella Catarina
Rating: 70% based on 6 votes
Italian diminutive of MARIA.
MARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mə-RIS-ə
Personal remark: Marissa Anne Rose
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Variant of MARISA.
MARLENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, English
Pronounced: mar-LEH-na(Polish) mahr-LEEN-ə(English)
Personal remark: Marlena Katherine
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Latinate form of MARLENE.
MARLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lee
Personal remark: Marley Kate
Rating: 23% based on 6 votes
From a surname that was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MAURA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: MAWR-ə(English)
Personal remark: Maura Erin
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It has also been associated with Gaelic mór meaning "great". This was the name of an obscure 5th-century Irish or Scottish martyr.
MAXEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Anglicized)
Pronounced: MAK-sən
Personal remark: Maxen Charles
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of MACSEN.
MAYA (3)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מַיָּה(Hebrew)
Personal remark: Maya Ashley
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Derived from Hebrew מַיִם (mayim) meaning "water".
MCKENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: mə-KEHN-ə
Personal remark: mn for Elissa
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
From a surname, the Gaelic form of which is Mac Cionaodha meaning "son of CIONAODH".
MEGHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHG-ən
Personal remark: Meghan Nicole
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
Variant of MEGAN.
MELANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-nee(English) MEH-la-nee(German) meh-la-NEE(German)
Personal remark: Melanie Rose
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μέλαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.

The name was common in France during the Middle Ages, and was it introduced from there to England, though it eventually became rare. Interest in it was revived by the character Melanie Wilkes from the novel Gone with the Wind (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939).

MELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek
Other Scripts: Μελίνα(Greek)
Pronounced: mə-LEE-nə(English)
Personal remark: Melina Grace
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μέλι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.
MICHAELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak, Greek
Other Scripts: Μιχαέλα(Greek)
Pronounced: mi-kha-EH-la(German) mi-KAY-lə(English) MI-kha-eh-la(Czech) MEE-kha-eh-la(Slovak)
Personal remark: Michaela Erin
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MILENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Slovak, Italian
Other Scripts: Милена(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian, Russian)
Pronounced: MI-leh-na(Czech) myee-LEH-na(Polish) myi-LYEH-nə(Russian) MEE-leh-na(Slovak) mee-LEH-na(Italian)
Personal remark: Milena Anne
Rating: 68% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of the Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.
MITCHELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MICH-əl
Personal remark: Mitchell Thomas
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
From a surname, itself derived from the given name MICHAEL or in some cases from Middle English michel meaning "big, large".
MONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: MAHN-i-kə(English) MAW-nee-ka(Italian) mo-NEE-ka(Romanian)
Personal remark: Monica Claire
Rating: 63% based on 7 votes
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
NADIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نادرة(Arabic)
Pronounced: NA-dee-rah
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of NADIR.
NAOMHÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Means "little saint", derived from Irish naomh "saint" combined with a diminutive suffix.
NATALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Greek, Georgian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ναταλία(Greek) ნატალია(Georgian) Наталия(Russian, Bulgarian) Наталія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: na-TA-lya(Polish, Italian, Spanish) na-TA-lee-a(Romanian) nə-TAHL-ee-ə(English)
Personal remark: Natalia Lauren
Rating: 80% based on 8 votes
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: NAT-ə-lee(English) NA-ta-lee(German)
Personal remark: Natalie Rose
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
NIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Personal remark: Nia Rhian
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
Welsh form of NIAMH.
NIAMH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NYEE-əv(Irish) NYEEV(Irish)
Personal remark: Niamh Siobhan
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.
NICHOLAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs, NIK-ləs
Personal remark: Nicholas Brennan
Rating: 75% based on 8 votes
From the Greek name Νικόλαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and λαός (laos) meaning "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

NICO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: NEE-ko(Italian, Dutch, Spanish)
Personal remark: nn for Nicola
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Short form of NICHOLAS (or sometimes NICODEMUS).
NICOLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: NEE-KAWL(French) ni-KOL(English) nee-KOL(Dutch) nee-KAWL(German)
Personal remark: nn for Rachel
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
French feminine form of NICHOLAS, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).
NICOLETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Personal remark: Nicoletta Giada
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
Feminine diminutive of NICOLA (1).
NIKOLINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Николина(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Personal remark: nn Lina
Rating: 72% based on 6 votes
Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian feminine form of NICHOLAS.
NOA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Biblical
Other Scripts: נוֹעָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: NO-a(Spanish)
Personal remark: Noa Leigh-Anne
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Modern Hebrew form of NOAH (2), the daughter of Zelophehad in the Bible. It is also the form used in several other languages, as well as the spelling used in some English versions of the Old Testament.
NOAH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: נֹחַ, נוֹחַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NO-ə(English) NO-a(German)
Personal remark: Noah Brennan
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
From the Hebrew name נֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, repose", derived from the root נוּחַ (nuach). According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the Great Flood. After the flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. He was the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.

As an English Christian name, Noah has been used since the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans. In the United States it quickly increased in popularity beginning in the 1990s, eventually becoming the most popular name for boys between 2013 and 2016.

A famous bearer was the American lexicographer Noah Webster (1758-1843).

NOLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NO-lən(English)
Personal remark: Nolan Michael
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
NORAH (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NAWR-ə
Personal remark: Norah Eireen
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Variant of NORA (1).
NOREEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: naw-REEN(English)
Personal remark: mn for Caoimhe/Noreen Siobhan
Rating: 18% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of NORA (1).
NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Personal remark: Nova Meghan
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
PARKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAHR-kər
Personal remark: Parker James
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
From an English occupational surname that meant "keeper of the park".
PATRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: PAT-rik(English) PA-TREEK(French) PA-trik(German)
Personal remark: Patrick Reilley
Rating: 66% based on 7 votes
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

RACHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Dutch, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: רָחֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: RAY-chəl(English) RA-SHEHL(French) RAH-khəl(Dutch) RA-khəl(German)
Personal remark: Rachel Nicole
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob. Jacob was tricked by her father Laban into marrying her older sister Leah first, though in exchange for seven years of work Laban allowed Jacob to marry Rachel too. Initially barren and facing her husband's anger, she offered her handmaid Bilhah to Jacob to bear him children. Eventually she was herself able to conceive, becoming the mother of Joseph and Benjamin.

The name was common among Jews in the Middle Ages, but it was not generally used as a Christian name in the English-speaking world until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was the American conservationist Rachel Carson (1907-1964).

REBEKAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: רִבְקָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: rə-BEHK-ə(English)
Personal remark: Rebekah Rowena
Rating: 33% based on 7 votes
Form of REBECCA used in some versions of the Bible.
RHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn(Welsh) ree-AN-ən(English)
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song Rhiannon (1976).

RILEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Personal remark: sp. Reilley-Reilley Patrick/Reilley Margaret
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
From a surname that comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
ROBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic [1]
Other Scripts: Роберт(Russian)
Pronounced: RAHB-ərt(American English) RAWB-ət(British English) RAW-BEHR(French) RO-beht(Swedish) RO-behrt(German, Finnish, Czech) RO-bərt(Dutch) RAW-behrt(Polish) RO-byirt(Russian) roo-BEHRT(Catalan)
Personal remark: nn Rob/Robby
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).

This name has been borne by two early kings of France, two Dukes of Normandy, and three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. The author Robert Browning (1812-1889) and poets Robert Burns (1759-1796) and Robert Frost (1874-1963) are famous literary bearers of this name. Other bearers include Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War, and American actors Robert Redford (1936-), Robert De Niro (1943-) and Robert Downey Jr. (1965-).

ROCCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: RAWK-ko(Italian)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Germanic name derived from the element hrok meaning "rest". This was the name of a 14th-century French saint who nursed victims of the plague but eventually contracted the disease himself. He is the patron saint of the sick.
RORY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAWR-ee
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.
ROWAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
RYAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: RIE-ən(English)
Personal remark: Ryan James
Rating: 85% based on 6 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
SALOMÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: SA-LAW-MEH(French) sə-loo-MEH(Portuguese)
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of SALOME.
SAOIRSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic.
SARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, English (Modern)
Personal remark: Sarina Ashley
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of SARA. In modern times it may also be a variant of SERENA.
SCOTT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: SKAHT(American English) SKAWT(British English)
Personal remark: Scott Jacob
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
From an English and Scottish surname that referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.
SEAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: SHAHN(Irish) SHAWN(English)
Personal remark: Sean Reilley/Patrick
Rating: 71% based on 7 votes
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SEANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SHAW-nə
Personal remark: Seanna Aislin
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of SEÁN.
SIOBHÁN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: shi-VAWN, SHI-wan
Personal remark: Siobhan Margaret/Kathleen/Katherine
Rating: 72% based on 6 votes
Irish form of Jehanne, a Norman French variant of JEANNE.
SONYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Соня(Russian)
Pronounced: SO-nyə(Russian) SON-yə(English) SAWN-yə(English)
Personal remark: Sonya Anne
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
Russian diminutive of SOPHIA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace (1869, English translation 1886).
SUMMER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUM-ər
Personal remark: Summer Rayne
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
SURAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ثريّا, ثريّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: thoo-RIE-ya, thoo-RIE-yah
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic ثريّا or ثريّة (see THURAYYA).
TAMSIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: TAM-zin
Personal remark: Tamsin Claire
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.
TANITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Rating: 15% based on 6 votes
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.
TARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAHR-ə, TEHR-ə, TAR-ə
Personal remark: Tara Anne
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish place name Teamhair, which possibly means "elevated place" in Gaelic. This was the name of the sacred hill near Dublin where the Irish high kings resided. It was popularized as a given name by the novel Gone with the Wind (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939), in which it is the name of the O'Hara plantation.
TARYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAR-in, TEHR-in
Personal remark: Taryn Heather
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Probably a feminine form of TYRONE. Actors Tyrone Power and Linda Christian created it for their daughter Taryn Power (1953-).
TASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Таша(Russian)
Pronounced: TAHSH-ə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Short form of NATASHA.
TAYLOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAY-lər
Personal remark: mn for Jesse
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
From an English surname that originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by the British-American author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TESSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: TEHS-ə(English)
Personal remark: Tessa Emily
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of THERESA.
THALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
Other Scripts: Θάλεια(Greek)
Pronounced: THAY-lee-ə(English) thə-LIE-ə(English)
Personal remark: Thalia Grace
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
From the Greek name Θάλεια (Thaleia), derived from θάλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites).
THOMAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Θωμάς(Greek) Θωμᾶς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAHM-əs(American English) TAWM-əs(British English) TAW-MA(French) TO-mas(German) TO-mahs(Dutch) tho-MAHS(Greek)
Personal remark: Thomas Reilley
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') meaning "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. It was reliably among the top five most common English names for boys from the 13th to the 19th century, and it has remained consistently popular to this day.

Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

THOMASINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: tahm-ə-SEE-nə
Rating: 23% based on 6 votes
Medieval feminine form of THOMAS.
TILLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIL-ee
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of MATILDA.
TRISTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: TRIS-tən(English) TREES-TAHN(French)
Personal remark: Tristan Jacob
Rating: 34% based on 7 votes
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion that makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
TYLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIE-lər
Personal remark: Tyler Brennan
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
From an English surname meaning "tiler of roofs", derived from Old English tigele "tile". The surname was borne by American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
VERITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VEHR-i-tee
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
VINCENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
Pronounced: VIN-sənt(English, Dutch) VEHN-SAHN(French) VEEN-tsent(Slovak)
Personal remark: nn Vin(nie)
Rating: 92% based on 6 votes
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was derived from Latin vincere meaning "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
WILLIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-yəm
Personal remark: nn Will
Rating: 73% based on 6 votes
From the Germanic name Willahelm meaning "will helmet", composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. From then until the modern era it has been among the most common of English names (with John, Thomas and Robert).

This name was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia. Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero (called Wilhelm in German, Guillaume in French and Guglielmo in Italian). In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

In the American rankings (since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it one of the most consistently popular names (although it has never reached the top rank). In modern times its short form, Liam, has periodically been more popular than William itself, in the United Kingdom in the 1990s and the United States in the 2010s.

YOCHEVED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יוֹכֶבֶד(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
Hebrew form of JOCHEBED.
ZACHARY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree(English)
Personal remark: Zachary Ryan
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Usual English form of ZACHARIAS, used in some English versions of the New Testament. This form has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. It was borne by American military commander and president Zachary Taylor (1784-1850).
ZEPHYR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ζέφυρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZEHF-ər(English)
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
From the Greek Ζέφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.
behindthename.com   ·   Copyright © 1996-2021