Names Categorized "food"

This is a list of names in which the categories include food.
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AERON (1)   m & f   Welsh
Either derived from Welsh aeron meaning "berry" or else from the name of a river in Wales.
AERONA   f   Welsh
Variant of AERON (1).
AERONWEN   f   Welsh
Combination of AERON (1) and the suffix gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
AERONWY   f   Welsh
Combination of AERON (1) and the suffix wy meaning "river".
AFANEN   f   Welsh (Rare)
Means "raspberry" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
AINA (3)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" and (na) meaning "vegetables, greens", as well as other character combinations.
AIRI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
ANARA   f   Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Means "pomegranate" in Kazakh and Kyrgyz, ultimately from Persian.
ANARGUL   f   Kazakh
Means "blooming pomegranate tree" in Kazakh.
ARISTA   f   Astronomy
Means "ear of corn" in Latin. This is the name of a star, also known as Spica, in the constellation Virgo.
ASWATHI   m   Indian, Malayalam
From Sanskrit अशवत्थ (ashvattha) meaning "sacred fig tree".
AVALON   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the island paradise to which King Arthur was brought after his death. The name of this island is perhaps related to Welsh afal meaning "apple", a fruit which was often linked with paradise.
BAŞAK   f   Turkish
Means "ear of wheat" in Turkish. This is also the Turkish name for the constellation Virgo.
BELÉN   f   Spanish
Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is derived via Greek from Hebrew בֵּית לָחֶם (beit lachem) meaning "house of bread".
BERRY (1)   m   English
Variant of BARRY.
BERRY (2)   f   English (Rare)
From the English word referring to the small fruit. It is ultimately derived from Old English berie. This name has only been in use since the 20th century.
BORÓKA   f   Hungarian
Means "juniper" in Hungarian.
CAESAR   m   Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which possibly meant "hairy", from Latin caesaries "hair". Julius Caesar and his adopted son Julius Caesar Octavianus (commonly known as Augustus) were both rulers of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC. Caesar was used as a title by the emperors that came after them.
CAM (1)   f   Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (cam) meaning "orange (fruit)".
CANDY   f   English
Diminutive of CANDACE. It is also influenced by the English word candy.
CARPUS   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latin form of the Greek name Καρπος (Karpos), which meant "fruit, profits". The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament in the second epistle of Timothy.
CERISE   f   French
Means "cherry" in French.
CHERRY   f   English
Simply means "cherry" from the name of the fruit. It can also be a diminutive of CHARITY. It has been in use since the late 19th century.
CICERO   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "chickpea" from Latin cicer. Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero) was a statesman, orator and author of the 1st century BC.
COCO   f   Various
Diminutive of names beginning with Co, influenced by the word cocoa. However, this was not the case for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (real name Gabrielle), whose nickname came from the name of a song she performed while working as a cabaret singer.
DAGON   m   Near Eastern Mythology
Derived from Ugaritic dgn meaning "grain". This was the name of a Semitic god of agriculture, usually depicted with the body of a fish.
DÁIRE   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "fruitful, fertile" in Irish Gaelic. This name is borne by many figures in Irish legend, including the Ulster chief who reneged on his promise to loan the Brown Bull of Cooley to Medb, starting the war between Connacht and Ulster as told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.
DÁIRÍNE   f   Irish
Derived from Irish Gaelic dáire meaning "fruitful, fertile".
DARA (1)   m   Irish
From the Irish Mac Dara which means "oak tree". This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara. It is also used as an Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARACH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARAGH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARDAN   m   Albanian
From the name of the Dardani, an Illyrian tribe who lived on the Balkan Peninsula. Their name may derive from an Illyrian word meaning "pear". They were unrelated to the ancient people who were also called the Dardans who lived near Troy.
DARDANA   f   Albanian
Feminine form of DARDAN.
DARINA (1)   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DÁIRÍNE.
DARRAGH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DEKEL   m   Hebrew
Means "palm tree" in Hebrew.
DIKLA   m & f   Hebrew
Variant transcription of DIKLAH.
DIKLAH   m & f   Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Possibly means "palm grove" in Hebrew or Aramaic. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Joktan. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name.
DULCE   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Means "sweet" or "candy" in Spanish.
DULCIBELLA   f   English (Archaic)
From Latin dulcis "sweet" and bella "beautiful". The usual medieval spelling of this name was Dowsabel, and the Latinized form Dulcibella was revived in the 18th century.
DULCIE   f   English
From Latin dulcis meaning "sweet". It was used in the Middle Ages in the spellings Dowse and Duce, and was recoined in the 19th century.
DULCINEA   f   Literature
Derived from Spanish dulce meaning "sweet". This name was (first?) used by Miguel de Cervantes in his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605), where it belongs to the love interest of the main character, though she never actually appears in the story.
DUNJA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Means "quince" in the South Slavic languages, a quince being a type of fruit.
EFRAIM   m   Hebrew, Biblical
Variant of EPHRAIM.
EFRAÍN   m   Spanish
Spanish form of EPHRAIM.
EFRAT   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of EPHRATH.
'EFRAYIM   m   Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of EPHRAIM.
EPHRAIM   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אֶפְרָיִם ('Efrayim) which meant "fruitful". In the Old Testament Ephraim is a son of Joseph and Asenath and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.
EPHRATH   f   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "fruitful place" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this name was borne by one of the wives of Caleb. Also in the Bible, it is the name of the place where Rachel was buried.
ESTI   f   Basque
Means "sweet, honey" in Basque.
ESTIÑNE   f   Basque
Variant of ESTI.
EUSTACHYS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "fruitful" in Greek. It is ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and σταχυς (stachus) "ear of corn".
EVRON   m   Yiddish
Yiddish form of EPHRAIM.
GERA   m   Biblical
Possibly means "a grain" in Hebrew. This was the name of several members of the tribe of Benjamin in the Old Testament.
GINEVRA   f   Italian
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
GINGER   f   English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GOLNAR   f   Persian
Derived from Persian گل (gol) "flower, rose" and انار (anar) "pomegranate".
GOLNARA   f   Tatar
Tatar form of GOLNAR.
GRÁINNE   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Gaelic grán meaning "grain". This was the name of an ancient Irish grain goddess. The name also belonged to the fiancée of Fionn mac Cumhail and the lover of Diarmaid in later Irish legend, and it is often associated with gráidh "love".
GROZDA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Feminine form of GROZDAN.
GROZDAN   m   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from Bulgarian or Macedonian грозде (grozde) meaning "grapes".
GROZDANA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian
Feminine form of GROZDAN.
GULNAR   f   Kazakh, Azerbaijani
Kazakh and Azerbaijani form of GOLNAR.
GULNARA   f   Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Kyrgyz
Kazakh, Azerbaijani and Kyrgyz form of GOLNAR.
GULNORA   f   Uzbek
Uzbek form of GOLNAR.
GWENITH   f   Welsh
Variant of GWYNETH, perhaps influenced by the Welsh word gwenith meaning "wheat".
HARUNA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "spring" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HINA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "light, sun, male" or (hi) meaning "sun, day" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HONEY   f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
IEVA   f   Lithuanian, Latvian
Lithuanian and Latvian form of EVE. This is also the Lithuanian and Latvian word for a type of cherry tree (species Prunus padus).
ITAMAR   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ITHAMAR.
ITHAMAR   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אִיתָמָר ('Itamar) meaning "palm island". This is the name of a son of Aaron in the Old Testament.
JAGA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian diminutive of AGATHA or JAGODA.
JAGODA   f   Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Polish
Means "strawberry" in South Slavic, and "berry" in Polish.
JAM   m   Persian Mythology
Persian form of Avestan Yima meaning "twin" (related to Sanskrit Yama). This was the name of a mythological king, more commonly called Jamshid.
JARAH   m   Biblical
Means "honeycomb" and "honeysuckle" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a descendant of Saul.
JAVOR   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Means "maple tree" in South Slavic.
JEVREM   m   Serbian
Serbian form of EPHRAIM.
JUNIPER   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
JUNÍPERO   m   Various
This was the name assumed by the 18th-century Spanish Franciscan monk Miguel José Serra, a missionary to California. He named himself after one of Saint Francis's companions, who was named from Latin iuniperus "juniper".
KAEDE   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese (kaede) meaning "maple" or other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
KANDAĴA   f   Esperanto
Means "made of candy" in Esperanto.
KARP   m   Russian
Russian form of Karpos (see CARPUS).
KARPOS   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Original Greek form of CARPUS.
KETUT   m & f   Indonesian, Balinese
Possibly from a Balinese word meaning "small banana". This name is traditionally given to the fourth child.
KİRAZ   f   Turkish
Means "cherry" in Turkish.
KIRI   f   Maori
Means "skin of a tree or fruit" in Maori. This name has been brought to public attention by New Zealand opera singer Kiri Te Kanawa (1944-).
KIRSIKKA   f   Finnish
Means "cherry" in Finnish.
KYO   m & f   Japanese
Variant transcription of KYOU.
KYOU   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (kyou) meaning "unite, cooperate", (kyou) meaning "capital city", (kyou) meaning "village", (kyou) meaning "apricot", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
LINA (1)   f   Arabic
Means either "palm tree" or "tender" in Arabic.
LINDEN   m   English
From a German surname which was derived from linde meaning "lime tree".
LINDON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of LYNDON.
LINFORD   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from place names meaning either "flax ford" or "lime tree ford" in Old English.
LINTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "lime tree town" in Old English.
LIV (2)   f   English
Short form of OLIVIA.
LIVIA (2)   f   English
Short form of OLIVIA.
LIVVY   f   English
Diminutive of OLIVIA.
LYNDON   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "lime tree hill" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president Lyndon B. Johnson (1908-1973).
LYNTON   m   English (Rare)
Variant of LINTON.
MADHU   f & m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu
From Sanskrit मधु (madhu) meaning "sweet, honey". This is another name of Chaitra, the first month of the Hindu year (which occurs in March and April).
MADHUKAR   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "bee, honey-maker" in Sanskrit.
MADHUR   m & f   Indian, Hindi
Means "sweet" in Sanskrit.
MADHURI   f   Indian, Marathi, Hindi, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada
Means "sweetness" in Sanskrit.
MAI (1)   f   Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (mai) meaning "plum, apricot".
MAIRE   f   Finnish
Derived from Finnish mairea "gushing, sugary".
MAKVALA   f   Georgian
Derived from Georgian მაყვალი (maqvali) meaning "blackberry".
MALINA (2)   f   Bulgarian, Serbian, Polish
Means "raspberry" in several Slavic languages.
MAO (1)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" or (mai) meaning "dance" combined with (o) meaning "center", (o) meaning "thread" or (o) meaning "cherry blossom". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MARJA   f   Dutch, Finnish
Dutch and Finnish form of MARIA. It also means "berry" in Finnish.
MEI (1)   f   Chinese
From Chinese (měi) meaning "beautiful" or (méi) meaning "plum", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.
MELIA   f   Greek Mythology
Means "ash tree" in Greek, a derivative of μελι (meli) "honey". This was the name of a nymph in Greek myth, the daughter of the Greek god Okeanos.
MELINA   f   English, Greek
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μελι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.
MELITON   m   Ancient Greek, Georgian
Derived from Greek μελι (meli) meaning "honey" (genitive μελιτος). This was the name of a 2nd-century bishop of Sardis who is regarded as a saint in the Orthodox Church.
MIELA   f   Esperanto
Means "honey-sweet" in Esperanto.
MINORU   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (minoru) meaning "to bear fruit", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations with the same pronunciation.
MOMOKA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (momo) meaning "hundred" or (momo) meaning "peach" combined with (ka) meaning "flower" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MOMOKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (momo) meaning "hundred" or (momo) meaning "peach" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be constructed from other kanji combinations as well.
NACHO   m   Spanish
Diminutive of IGNACIO.
NANA (2)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and/or (na), a phonetic character. The characters can be in either order or the same character can be duplicated, as indicated by the symbol . Other kanji with the same pronunciations can also be used to form this name.
NANAKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" duplicated and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.
NANAMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (nana) meaning "seven" and (mi) meaning "sea". It can also come from (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" duplicated and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
NATSUKI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsuki) meaning "moon". Alternatively, it can come from (natsu) meaning "summer" and (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji combinations can form this name as well.
NATSUMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (natsu) meaning "summer" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". It can also come from (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsumi) meaning "pick, pluck". Other kanji combinations are possible.
NOLL   m   Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of OLIVER.
OLI   m   English
Short form of OLIVER.
OLIVA   f   Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "olive". This was the name of a 2nd-century saint from Brescia.
OLIVE   f   English
From the English word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.
OLIVÉR   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of OLIVER.
OLIVER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVERA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Feminine form of OLIVER.
OLIVETTE   f   Literature
Feminine form of OLIVER. This was the name of the title character in the French opera 'Les noces d'Olivette' (1879) by Edmond Audran.
OLÍVIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of OLIVIA.
OLIVIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
OLIVIE   f   French (Rare), Czech (Rare)
French and Czech form of OLIVIA.
OLIVIER   m   French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
OLIVIERO   m   Italian
Italian form of OLIVER.
OLIWIA   f   Polish
Polish form of OLIVIA.
OLIWIER   m   Polish (Rare)
Polish form of OLIVER.
OLLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
OLYVIA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of OLIVIA.
PALMER   m   English
From an English surname meaning "pilgrim". It is ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PALMIRA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of PALMIRO.
PALMIRO   m   Italian
Means "pilgrim" in Italian. In medieval times it denoted one who had been a pilgrim to Palestine. It is ultimately from the word palma meaning "palm tree", because of the custom of pilgrims to bring palm fronds home with them. The name is sometimes given to a child born on Palm Sunday.
PAM   f   English
Short form of PAMELA.
PAMELA   f   English
This name was invented in the late 16th century by the poet Sir Philip Sidney for use in his poem 'Arcadia'. He possibly intended it to mean "all sweetness" from Greek παν (pan) "all" and μελι (meli) "honey". It was later employed by author Samuel Richardson for the heroine in his novel 'Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded' (1740), after which time it became used as a given name. It did not become popular until the 20th century.
PAMELIA   f   English
Elaborated form of PAMELA.
PAMELLA   f   English
Variant of PAMELA.
PAMILA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of PAMELA.
PANIZ   f   Persian
Possibly means "sugar" in Persian.
PERRY   m   English
From a surname which is either English or Welsh in origin. It can be derived from Middle English perrie meaning "pear tree", or else from Welsh ap Herry, meaning "son of HERRY". A famous bearer of the surname was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
PHILOMELA   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and μηλον (melon) "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μελος (melos) "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.
PIPRA   f   Esperanto
Means "peppery" in Esperanto.
POLYCARP   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Πολυκαρπος (Polykarpos) meaning "fruitful, rich in fruit", ultimately from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and καρπος (karpos) "fruit". Saint Polycarp was a 2nd-century bishop of Smyrna who was martyred by being burned at the stake and then stabbed.
POLYKARPOS   m   Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of POLYCARP.
POMONA   f   Roman Mythology
From Latin pomus "fruit tree". This was the name of the Roman goddess of fruit trees.
PRUNE   f   French
Means "plum" in French.
PRUNELLA   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, also called self-heal, ultimately a derivative of the Latin word pruna "plum".
RINA (4)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "village" combined with (na), a phonetic character, or (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
SHAHD   f   Arabic
Means "honey" in Arabic.
SHAKED   f & m   Hebrew
Means "almond" in Hebrew.
STEW   m   English
Short form of STEWART.
TAFFY   m   Welsh
Diminutive of DAFYDD.
TAKUMI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (takumi) meaning "artisan" or (takumi) meaning "skillful". It can also come from (taku) meaning "expand, open, support" combined with (mi) meaning "sea, ocean" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth". This name can also be formed of other kanji combinations.
TAMAR   f   Hebrew, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "palm tree" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament Tamar was the daughter-in-law of Judah and later his wife. This was also the name of a daughter of King David. She was raped by her half-brother Amnon, leading to his murder by her brother Absalom. The name was borne by a 12th-century ruling queen of Georgia who presided over the kingdom at the peak of its power.
TAMARA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian
Russian form of TAMAR. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).
TAMARI   f   Georgian
Georgian variant of TAMAR.
TAMERA   f   English
Variant of TAMARA.
TAMI   f   English
Variant of TAMMY.
TAMIA   f   English (Modern)
Elaborated form of the popular name syllable Tam, from names such as TAMARA or TAMIKA. It was popularized by Canadian singer Tamia Hill (1975-), who is known simply as Tamia.
TAMMARA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of TAMARA.
TAMMI   f   English
Variant of TAMMY.
TAMMIE   f   English
Variant of TAMMY.
TAMMY   f   English
Short form of TAMARA and other names beginning with Tam.
TAMRA   f   English
Contracted form of TAMARA.
TÉLESPHORE   m   French (Rare)
French form of the Greek name Τελεσφορος (Telesphoros) which means "bringing fulfillment" or "bearing fruit". Saint Telesphorus was a 2nd-century pope and martyr.
TELESPHOROS   m   Ancient Greek
Greek form of TÉLESPHORE.
TELESPHORUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Telesphoros (see TÉLESPHORE).
TERHO   m   Finnish
Means "acorn" in Finnish.
THAMAR   f   Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin
Form of TAMAR used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
THAMIR   m   Arabic
Means "fruitful" in Arabic.
TOMA (1)   f   Russian
Diminutive of TAMARA.
TOMER   m   Hebrew
Means "palm tree" in Hebrew.
UME   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ume) meaning "plum". In Japan the plum blossom is thought to symbolize devotion. Different kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
UMEKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ume) meaning "plum" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
VIŠNJA   f   Croatian, Serbian
Means "sour cherry" in Croatian and Serbian.
VIVI   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian diminutive of names beginning with Vi, as well as OLIVIA and SOFIA.
YAARA   f   Hebrew
Means "honeycomb" and "honeysuckle" in Hebrew.
YA'RAH   m   Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of JARAH.
YAVOR   m   Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of JAVOR.
YEFREM   m   Russian
Russian form of EPHRAIM.
YESENIA   f   Spanish (Latin American)
From Jessenia, the genus name of a type of tree found in South America. This name was first used by Yolanda Vargas in the Telenovela 'Yesenia' (1970).
YUINA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (yui) meaning "tie, bind" and (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
YUUNA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yuu) meaning "grapefruit, pomelo, citrus fruit" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" or (na), a phonetic character. Other combinations of kanji are also possible.
YUZUKI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (yuzu) meaning "grapefruit, pomelo, citrus fruit" and (ki) meaning "hope". Other combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
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