Names Categorized "cartoon characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include cartoon characters.
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AMON m Egyptian Mythology (Anglicized)
From Αμμων (Ammon), the Greek form of Egyptian Ymn (reconstructed as Yamanu) meaning "the hidden one". In early Egyptian mythology he was a god of the air, creativity and fertility, who was particularly revered in Thebes. Later, during the Middle Kingdom, his attributes were combined with those of the god Ra and he was worshipped as the supreme solar deity Amon-Ra.
ARNOLD m English, German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
BART m English, Dutch
Short form of BARTHOLOMEW. This name is borne by a cartoon boy on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
BLOSSOM f English
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
DEXTER m English
From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".
DUDLEY m English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
ELMER m English
From a surname that was derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR. In the United States it is sometimes given in honour of brothers Jonathan (1745-1817) and Ebenezer Elmer (1752-1843), who were active in early American politics.
GARFIELD m English
From a surname meaning "triangle field" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president James A. Garfield (1831-1881). It is now associated with the cat in Jim Davis's cartoon strip 'Garfield'.
GARNET (1) f English
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
GINGER f English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
HARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HIROSHI m Japanese
From Japanese (hiroshi) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiroshi) meaning "prosperous", or other kanji and kanji combinations that are read the same way.
HOMER m English, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ομηρος (Homeros), derived from ‘ομηρος (homeros) meaning "hostage, pledge". Homer was the Greek epic poet who wrote the 'Iliad', about the Trojan War, and the 'Odyssey', about Odysseus's journey home after the war. There is some debate about when he lived, or if he was even a real person, though most scholars place him in the 8th century BC. In the modern era, Homer has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world (chiefly in America) since the 18th century. This name is borne by the cartoon father on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
HOPE f English
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
IZUMI f Japanese
From Japanese (izumi) meaning "fountain, spring". This name can also be constructed from other combinations of kanji.
JASPER m English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JAYA f & m Hinduism, Tamil, Indian, Telugu, Hindi, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit जय (jaya) meaning "victory". This is a transcription of both the feminine form जया (an epithet of the Hindu goddess Durga) and the masculine form जय (borne by several characters in Hindu texts). As a modern personal name, this transcription is both feminine and masculine in southern India, but typically only feminine in the north.
JEM m English
Diminutive of JEREMY (and formerly of JAMES).
JET f Dutch
Short form of HENRIËTTE or MARIËTTE.
JUNE f English
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
KENJI m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or (ken) meaning "study, sharpen" combined with (ji) meaning "two". This name can also be formed from other combinations of kanji characters.
LIN m & f Chinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest" or (lín) meaning "fine jade, gem". Other characters can also form this name.
LOU f & m English, French
Short form of LOUISE or LOUIS. Famous bearers include the baseball player Lou Gehrig (1903-1941) and the musician Lou Reed (1942-2013).
MARVIN m English, German
Probably from an English surname that was derived from the given name MERVYN. A famous bearer was the American musician Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
MING m & f Chinese
From Chinese (míng) meaning "bright, light, clear" or (míng) meaning "inscribe, engrave", as well as other characters that are pronounced similarly.
OPAL f English
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
PEMA m & f Tibetan, Bhutanese
Tibetan form of PADMA.
REN m & f Japanese
From Japanese (ren) meaning "lotus", (ren) meaning "love", or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
ROHAN (1) m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Kannada
Derived from Sanskrit रोहण (rohana) meaning "ascending".
SELA f English (Rare)
From the name of a city, the capital of Edom, which appears in the Old Testament. It means "rock" in Hebrew.
SHIRO m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 四郎 (see SHIROU).
SYLVESTER m English, Dutch, Danish, German
Medieval variant of SILVESTER. This is currently the usual English spelling of the name. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a famous bearer.
TASHI m & f Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "good fortune" in Tibetan.
TENZIN m & f Tibetan, Bhutanese
From Tibetan བསྟན་འཛིན (bstan-'dzin) meaning "upholder of teachings". This is one of the given names of the current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).
TUYẾN f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (tuyến) meaning "thread, line, ray".
TYCHO m Danish, Dutch
Latinized form of TYGE. This name was borne by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601).
URSA f Late Roman
Feminine form of URSUS. This is the name of two constellations in the northern sky: Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.
VELMA f English
Probably a variant of WILMA, the spelling with an e perhaps due to the influence of SELMA (1). This name has been in use since the 19th century.
WINSLOW m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE". A famous bearer of this name was American painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910).
ZAHEER m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic ظهير or زاهر or ظاهر (see ZAHIR).