Names Categorized "currently out of the US top 1000"

This is a list of names in which the categories include currently out of the US top 1000.
gender
usage
Abbey f English
Diminutive of Abigail.
Abbie f English
Diminutive of Abigail.
Abdul m Arabic, Urdu, Punjabi, Pashto, Uzbek, Bengali, Indonesian, Malay
First part of compound Arabic names beginning with عبد ال ('Abd al) meaning "servant of the" (such as عبد العزيز ('Abd al-'Aziz) meaning "servant of the powerful").
Abner m English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "my father is a light" in Hebrew, from אָב ('av) meaning "father" and נֵר (ner) meaning "lamp, light". In the Old Testament, Abner was a cousin of Saul and the commander of his army. After he killed Asahel he was himself slain by Asahel's brother Joab.... [more]
Achilles m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek Ἀχιλλεύς (Achilleus), which is of unknown meaning, perhaps derived from Greek ἄχος (achos) meaning "pain" or else from the name of the Achelous River. This was the name of a warrior in Greek legend, one of the central characters in Homer's Iliad. The bravest of the Greek heroes in the war against the Trojans, he was eventually killed by an arrow to his heel, the only vulnerable part of his body.... [more]
Achsah f Biblical
Means "anklet, bangle" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the daughter of Caleb.
Adah f Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "adornment, ornament" in Hebrew. This was the name of the wives of both Lamech and Esau in the Old Testament.
Addie f English
Diminutive of Adelaide, Adeline, Addison and other names containing the same sound.
Addy 1 f English
Diminutive of Adelaide, Adeline, Addison and other names containing the same sound.
Adela f English, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Old German element adal meaning "noble" (Proto-Germanic *aþalaz). Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.
Adelia f English, Spanish
Elaborated form of Adela.
Adella f English
Variant of Adela.
Adelle f English
Variant of Adele.
Adin m Bosnian
Meaning unknown, possibly from Turkish ad meaning "name".
Adina 1 m & f Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Hebrew
From Hebrew עֲדִינָא ('adina') meaning "delicate". This name is borne by a soldier in the Old Testament. It is also used in modern Hebrew as a feminine name, typically spelled עֲדִינָה.
Aditya m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Nepali, Indonesian
Means "belonging to Aditi" in Sanskrit. This is a name for the seven (or eight) Hindu gods who are the children of Aditi. It is also another name for the sun god Surya.
Adlai m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Contracted form of Adalia. This is the name of the father of one of King David's herdsmen in the Old Testament.
Adolf m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Germanic
From the Old German name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the elements adal "noble" and wolf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
Adolfo m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Adolf.
Adolph m English
English form of Adolf, rarely used since World War II.
Adolphus m Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Adolf.
Adria f English
Short form of Adriana.
Adrianne f English
Feminine form of Adrian.
Agatha f English, German, Dutch, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀγαθή (Agathe), derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
Aggie f English
Diminutive of Agnes or Agatha.
Agnes f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἁγνή (Hagne), derived from Greek ἁγνός (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.... [more]
Ah m & f Chinese
From the Chinese character (ā), which has no distinct meaning. It is not normally given as a name, but it can be prefixed to another name to make it a diminutive.
Aída f Spanish
Spanish form of Ayda.
Aida f Arabic, Bosnian, Albanian, Literature
Variant of Ayda. This name was used in Verdi's opera Aida (1871), where it belongs to an Ethiopian princess held captive in Egypt.
Aimé m French
From Old French Amé, the masculine form of Amée (see Amy).
Aimée f French
French form of Amy.
Akeem m African American
Perhaps a variant of Hakim.
Akira m & f Japanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name. A famous bearer was the Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), given name written .
Aksel m Danish, Norwegian
Variant of Axel.
Al m English
Short form of Albert and other names beginning with Al. A notable bearer is American actor Al Pacino (1940-).
Alain m French
French form of Alan.
Alannah f Irish, English (Modern)
Variant of Alana. It has been influenced by the affectionate Anglo-Irish word alannah, from the Irish Gaelic phrase a leanbh meaning "O child".
Alba 1 f Italian, Spanish, Catalan
This name is derived from two distinct names, Alba 2 and Alba 3, with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
Alberta f English, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Feminine form of Albert. This is the name of a Canadian province, which was named in honour of a daughter of Queen Victoria.
Albertina f Italian, Portuguese
Feminine diminutive of Albert.
Albertine f French
French feminine form of Albert.
Albertus m Germanic (Latinized), Dutch
Latinized form of Albert. This is the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but commonly rendered Albert in daily life.
Albin m Swedish, French, English, Slovene, Polish
Form of Albinus in several languages.
Albina f Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Belarusian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Albinus. This was the name of a few early saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
Alby m Irish
Anglicized masculine form of Ailbhe.
Alcide m Italian, French
Italian and French form of Alcides.
Alda 1 f Italian, Portuguese, Germanic
Feminine form of Aldo.
Aldona f Lithuanian, Polish
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a 14th-century Polish queen, the daughter of a Grand Duke of Lithuania.
Aldric m French (Rare), Germanic
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements alt "old" and rih "ruler, king". Saint Aldric was a 9th-century bishop of Le Mans.
Alease f English
Possibly a variant of Alicia.
Alecia f English
Variant of Alicia.
Alesia f English
Possibly a variant of Alicia.
Aleta f English
Possibly a variant of Alethea. This was the name of the wife of the title character in the comic strip Prince Valiant, which first appeared in 1937.
Aletha f English
Variant of Alethea.
Alethea f English
Derived from Greek ἀλήθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 16th century.
Alexina f English
Feminine form of Alex, or a diminutive of Alexis.
Alf 1 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse alfr meaning "elf". In Norse legend this was the name of king, the suitor of a reluctant maiden named Alfhild. She avoided marrying him by disguising herself as a warrior, but when they fought she was so impressed by his strength that she changed her mind.
Alf 2 m English
Short form of Alfred.
Alf 3 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of Adolf.
Alfie m English
Diminutive of Alfred.
Alger m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name Algar.
Algernon m English
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy). This name was borne by a character (a mouse) in the short story Flowers for Algernon (1958) and novel of the same title (1966) by the American author Daniel Keyes.
Alida f Dutch, German, Hungarian
Diminutive of Adelaide.
Aline f French, Portuguese (Brazilian), English
Medieval short form of Adeline. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of Eileen. This was the name of a popular 1965 song by the French singer Christophe.
Alissa f English
Variant of Alyssa.
Alla f Russian, Ukrainian
Meaning unknown, possibly of German origin.
Ally 2 m Scottish
Diminutive of Alistair.
Allyn m & f English
Variant or feminine form of Alan.
Almira 1 f Literature
Variant of Elmira 1. Handel used it for the title character in his opera Almira (1705).
Alois m German, Czech
German and Czech form of Aloysius.
Alon 1 m Hebrew
Means "oak tree" in Hebrew.
Aloys m Medieval Occitan
Medieval Occitan form of Louis.
Aloysius m English
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of Louis. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.
Alphonse m French
French form of Alfonso.
Alphonsine f French
French feminine diminutive of Alfonso.
Alphonso m English
Variant of Alfonso.
Alta f Various
Possibly from Latin altus or Italian/Spanish alto meaning "high".
Althea f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Ἀλθαία (Althaia), perhaps related to Greek ἄλθος (althos) meaning "healing". In Greek myth she was the mother of Meleager. Soon after her son was born she was told that he would die as soon as a piece of wood that was burning on her fire was fully consumed. She immediately extinguished the piece of wood and sealed it in a chest, but in a fit of rage many years later she took it out and set it alight, thereby killing her son.
Alton m English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "town at the source of the river" in Old English.
Alva 1 f Swedish, Norwegian
Feminine form of Alf 1.
Alva 2 m English
Variant of Alvah. A famous bearer of this name was the inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
Alvah m Biblical
Means "his highness" in Hebrew. This name is mentioned in the Old Testament as belonging to a descendant of Esau.
Alvena f English
Feminine form of Alvin.
Alvina f English
Feminine form of Alvin.
Alvis m Norse Mythology, Latvian
From the Old Norse Alvíss meaning "all wise". In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf who was to marry Thor's daughter Thrud. Thor was not pleased with this so he tricked Alvis by asking him questions until the sun rose, at which time the dwarf was turned into stone.
Alwilda f History
Latinized form of Alfhild. This was the name of a legendary female Scandinavian pirate, also called Awilda.
Alwin m German, Dutch, Germanic
Contracted form of Adalwin.
Alwine f German (Rare)
Feminine form of Alwin.
Alyce f English
Variant of Alice.
Alycia f English
Variant of Alicia.
Alys f English
Variant of Alice.
Alysia f English
Variant of Alicia.
Ama f Western African, Akan
Means "born on Saturday" in Akan.
Amado m Spanish
Spanish form of Amatus.
Amalie f Norwegian, Danish, German (Rare)
Norwegian, Danish and German form of Amalia.
Amare m African American (Modern)
Variant of Amari. This name is borne by basketball player Amar'e Stoudemire (1982-).
Amberly f English (Modern)
Elaboration of Amber, influenced by the spelling of the name Kimberly.
America f English
In the English-speaking world, this name is usually given in reference to the United States of America (see Amerigo). It came into use as an American name in the 19th century.
Amerigo m Italian
Medieval Italian form of Emmerich. Amerigo Vespucci (1451-1512) was the Italian explorer who gave the continent of America its name (from Americus, the Latin form of his name).
Ami 2 f English
Variant of Amy.
Ami 3 f Japanese
From Japanese (a) meaning "second, Asia" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Amie f English
Variant of Amy.
Aminah 1 f Arabic, Malay, Indonesian
Derived from Arabic أمِنَ (amina) meaning "feel safe". This was the name of the Prophet Muhammad's mother, who died when he was young.
Aminah 2 f Arabic
Feminine form of Amin.
Amit 1 m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Odia, Punjabi, Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali
Means "immeasurable, infinite" in Sanskrit.
Amit 2 m & f Hebrew
Means "friend" in Hebrew.
Ammon m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Yamanu (see Amon).
Amon m Egyptian Mythology (Anglicized)
From Ἄμμων (Ammon), the Greek form of Egyptian jmn (reconstructed as Yamanu) meaning "the hidden one". In early Egyptian mythology he was a god of the air, creativity and fertility, who was particularly revered in Thebes. Later, during the Middle Kingdom, his attributes were combined with those of the god Ra and he was worshipped as the supreme solar deity Amon-Ra.
Amparo f Spanish
Means "protection, shelter, refuge" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Amparo, meaning "Our Lady of Refuge".
Anabel f Spanish
Spanish form of Annabel, also commonly used as a contraction of Ana Isabel.
Anatole m French
French form of Anatolius.
Anděla f Czech
Czech form of Angela.
Andra 2 f Romanian
Short form of Alexandra.
Andreas m German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek and Latin form of Andrew. It is also the form used in Modern Greek, German and Welsh.
Angèle f French
French feminine form of Angelus (see Angel).
Ángeles f Spanish
Means "angels", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles, meaning "Our Lady the Queen of the Angels".
Angelia f English
Elaborated form of Angela.
Angelika f German, Polish, Hungarian
Form of Angelica in several languages.
Angeline f French
French diminutive of Angela.
Angelita f Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Angela.
Angus m Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of Aonghus.
Anissa f English
This name was first brought to public attention in 1966 by the child actress Anissa Jones (1958-1976). In her case it was a transcription of the Arabic name أنيسة (see Anisa), given to honour her Lebanese heritage. Other parents who have since used this name may view it simply as an elaboration of Anna using the popular name suffix issa.
Anita 1 f Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian, Hungarian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of Ana.
Anita 2 f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Tamil
Feminine form of Anit.
Anjali f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Nepali
Means "salutation" in Sanskrit.
Anjanette f English
Perhaps a blend of Angela and Antonette, or Ann and Janette. It had a little burst of popularity in the United States in the 1960s, when the actress Anjanette Comer (1939-) was active.
Ann f English, Manx
English and Manx form of Anne 1. In the English-speaking world, both this spelling and Anne have been used since the late Middle Ages. Currently Ann is less popular than Anne (and both are less popular than their relatives Anna and Hannah).
Annabel f English, Dutch
Variant of Amabel, with the spelling altered as if it were a combination of Anna and French belle "beautiful". This name appears to have arisen in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
Annabella f Italian, English (Modern)
Latinate form of Annabel. It can also be interpreted as a combination of Anna and Latin/Italian bella "beautiful".
Anne-Marie f French
Combination of Anne 1 and Marie.
Annemarie f Dutch, German, Danish
Combination of Anna and Marie.
Annetta f Italian
Latinate diminutive of Anna.
Annette f French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of Anne 1. It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-2013).
Annis f English
Medieval English form of Agnes.
Anona f English
Meaning unknown. It was possibly inspired by an American song by this name written by Vivian Grey in 1903 and recorded by musician Vess Ossman. The lyrics tell of a Native American woman named Anona from Arizona.
Ansel m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Anselm. A famous bearer was American photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984).
Anson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of Agnes".
Antoinette f French
Feminine diminutive of Antoine. This name was borne by Marie Antoinette, the queen of France during the French Revolution. She was executed by guillotine.
Antonette f English
Diminutive of Antonia.
Antony m English
Variant of Anthony. This was formerly the usual English spelling of the name, but during the 17th century the h began to be added.
Antwan m African American
Variant of Antoine, in use since the 1960s.
Anwar m Arabic, Urdu, Indonesian
Means "brighter, more luminous" in Arabic. This name was borne by Egyptian president Anwar Sadat (1918-1981), who was assassinated three years after being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
Anxhela f Albanian
Albanian form of Angela.
Apikalia f Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of Abigail.
Araminta f English (Rare)
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy The Old Bachelor (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy The Confederacy (1705). This was the original given name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.
Archibald m Scottish, English
Derived from the Germanic name Ercanbald, composed of the elements erkan meaning "pure, holy, genuine" and bald meaning "bold, brave". The first element was altered due to the influence of Greek names beginning with the element ἀρχός (archos) meaning "master". The Normans brought this name to England. It first became common in Scotland in the Middle Ages (sometimes used to Anglicize the Gaelic name Gilleasbuig, for unknown reasons).
Ardath f English
From the name of a plain that appears in the apocryphal book of 2 Esdras (verse 9:26) in some versions of the Old Testament. This place name was used by Marie Corelli for the title of an 1889 novel, which is probably the reason it gained some currency as a given name just after this time.
Ardith f English
Variant of Ardath.
Areli m Biblical
Means "lion of God, hero" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.
Aretha f English
Possibly derived from Greek ἀρετή (arete) meaning "virtue". This name was popularized in the 1960s by American singer Aretha Franklin (1942-2018).
Ariadne f Greek Mythology
Means "most holy", composed of the Greek prefix ἀρι (ari) meaning "most" combined with Cretan Greek ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
Ariane f French, German
French form of Ariadne.
Arie 1 m Dutch
Diminutive of Adriaan.
Arlen m English
Meaning unknown, possibly from a surname.
Arlene f English, Filipino
Variant of Arline. Since the onset of the 20th century, this is the most common spelling of this name.
Arlette f French
French form of Herleva.
Arlie f & m English
Diminutive of Arline and other names beginning with Arl.
Arline f English
Meaning unknown, possibly invented by Michael William Balfe for the main character in his opera The Bohemian Girl (1843).
Armand m French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of Herman.
Armida f Italian, Spanish (Latin American)
Probably created by the 16th-century Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his epic poem Jerusalem Delivered (1580). In the poem Armida is a beautiful enchantress who bewitches many of the crusaders.
Armin m German
Modern form of Arminius.
Arnie m English
Diminutive of Arnold.
Arnold m English, German, Dutch, Polish, Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and walt "power, authority". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
Arsenio m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of Arsenios.
Art m English
Short form of Arthur.
Artie m & f English
Diminutive and feminine form of Arthur.
Arvel m English
Meaning unknown, possibly a variant of Arwel.
Arvid m Swedish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements ǫrn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
Arvo m Finnish, Estonian
Means "value, worth" in Finnish and Estonian.
Asha 1 f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Derived from Sanskrit आशा (asha) meaning "wish, desire, hope".
Asha 2 f Eastern African, Swahili
From Swahili ishi meaning "live, exist".
Ashanti f & m Various
From the name of an African people who reside in southern Ghana. It possibly means "warlike" in the Twi language.
Ashlea f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Ashley.
Ashlee f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Ashley.
Ashleigh f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Ashley.
Ashlie f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Ashley.
Asia 1 f English (Modern), Italian (Modern)
From the name of the continent, which is perhaps derived from Akkadian asu, meaning "east".
Assunta f Italian
Means "taken up, received, assumed" in Italian, referring to the assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven.
Attilio m Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Atilius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. Marcus Atilius Regulus was a Roman consul and hero of the First Punic War.
Audie m & f English
In the case of the famed American soldier Audie Murphy (1925-1971), it is of uncertain meaning. As a feminine name, it can be a diminutive of Audrey.
Audley m English
From a surname that was taken from a place name meaning "Ealdgyð's clearing" in Old English.
Audra 1 f Lithuanian
Means "storm" in Lithuanian.
Audra 2 f English
Variant of Audrey, used since the 19th century. It jumped in popularity in the United States after the debut of the television series The Big Valley (1965-1969), which featured the character Audra Barkley.
Augusta f Italian, Portuguese, English, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Augustus. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
Auguste 1 m French
French form of Augustus.
Augustin m French, Romanian, Czech, German (Rare)
Form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1) in several languages.
Augustina f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Augustinus (see Augustine 1).
Aura f English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αὔρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
Aurore f French
French form of Aurora.
Avigail f Hebrew
Modern Hebrew form of Abigail.
'Avigayil f Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of Abigail.
Avis f English
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element awi, of unknown meaning. The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
Aviv m & f Hebrew
Means "spring" in Hebrew.
Aviva f Hebrew
Feminine variant of Aviv.
Avrora f Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Aurora.
Ayesha f Arabic, Urdu, Bengali
Alternate transcription of Arabic عائشة or Urdu عائشہ (see Aisha), as well as the usual Bengali form.
Babe m & f English
From a nickname meaning "baby", also a slang term meaning "attractive person". As a feminine name, in some cases it is a diminutive of Barbara.
Babette f French, German, Dutch, English
French diminutive of Élisabeth or Barbara.
Baldwin m English, Germanic
Means "bold friend", derived from the Old German elements bald "bold, brave" and wini "friend". In the Middle Ages this was a popular name in Flanders and among the Normans, who brought it to Britain. It was borne by one of the leaders of the First Crusade, an 11th-century nobleman from Flanders. After the crusaders conquered Jerusalem, he was crowned as the king of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
Bambi f English
Derived from Italian bambina meaning "young girl". The American novelist Marjorie Benton Cooke used it in her novel Bambi (1914). This was also the name of a male deer in a cartoon by Walt Disney, which was based on a 1923 novel by Swiss author Felix Salten.
Barb f English
Short form of Barbara.
Barbra f English
Variant of Barbara.
Barney m English
Diminutive of Barnabas, Bernard or Barnaby.
Barry m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Barra.
Bart m English, Dutch
Short form of Bartholomew or Bartholomeus. This name is borne by a mischievous cartoon boy on the television series The Simpsons.
Bartholomew m English, Biblical
English form of Βαρθολομαῖος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of Talmai". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.
Basil 1 m English
From the Greek name Βασίλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλεύς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
Baxter m English
From an occupational surname that meant "(female) baker", from Old English bæcere and a feminine agent suffix.
Bayard m Literature
Derived from Old French baiart meaning "bay coloured". In medieval French poetry Bayard was a bay horse owned by Renaud de Montauban and his brothers. The horse could magically adjust its size to carry multiple riders.
Bea f English, Hungarian, Dutch
Short form of Beatrix or Beáta.
Beatrix f German, Hungarian, Dutch, English, Late Roman
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator meaning "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed, happy". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.... [more]
Beatriz f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Beatrix.
Belinda f English
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. The first element could be related to Italian bella meaning "beautiful". The second element could be Old German lind meaning "soft, flexible, tender" (and by extension "snake, serpent"). This name first arose in the 17th century, and was subsequently used by Alexander Pope in his poem The Rape of the Lock (1712).
Benita f Spanish
Feminine form of Benito.
Benjamine f French
French feminine form of Benjamin.
Benji m English
Diminutive of Benjamin.
Bennie m English
Diminutive of Benjamin or Benedict.
Benny m English
Diminutive of Benjamin or Benedict.
Benton m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
Berenice f English, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βερενίκη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενίκη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φέρω (phero) meaning "to bring" and νίκη (nike) meaning "victory". This name was common among the Ptolemy ruling family of Egypt, a dynasty that was originally from Macedon. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament (in most English bibles it is spelled Bernice) belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II. As an English name, Berenice came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
Berlin f & m Various
From the name of the city in Germany, which is of uncertain meaning.
Bernadette f French, English, German, Dutch
French feminine form of Bernard. Bernadette Soubirous (1844-1879) was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary. She was declared a saint in 1933.
Bernadine f English
Feminine form of Bernard.
Bernard m English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Germanic
Derived from the Old German element bern "bear" combined with hart "hard, firm, brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
Bernardine f French (Rare)
French feminine form of Bernardino.
Bernardo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Bernard.
Bernetta f English
Diminutive of Berenice.
Bernice f English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Contracted form of Berenice. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II.
Bernie m & f English
Diminutive of Bernard, Bernadette, Bernice and other names beginning with Bern.
Berniece f English
Variant of Bernice.
Bert m English, German, Dutch
Short form of Albert and other names containing the element bert, often derived from the Old German element beraht meaning "bright".
Berta f Polish, Czech, Hungarian, German, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Slovene
Form of Bertha in several languages.
Bertha f German, English, Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the Old Frankish or Old Saxon element berht, Old High German beraht meaning "bright" (Proto-Germanic *berhtaz). This was the name of a few early saints, including a 6th-century Frankish princess who married and eventually converted King Æþelbeorht of Kent. It was also borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century (also called Bertrada), and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
Bertie m & f English
Diminutive of Albert, Herbert and other names containing bert (often derived from the Old German element beraht meaning "bright").
Bertina f English
Feminine form of Bert.
Bertram m English, German, Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Old German element beraht "bright" combined with hram "raven". This name has long been conflated with Bertrand. The Normans introduced it to England, and Shakespeare used it in his play All's Well That Ends Well (1603).
Bertrand m French, English, Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements beraht meaning "bright" and rant meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with Bertram and the two names have merged to some degree. Saint Bertrand was an 11th-century bishop of Comminges in France. Another famous bearer was the English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
Beryl f English
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
Bess f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Bessie f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Beth f English
Short form of Elizabeth, or sometimes Bethany.
Bethel f English
From an Old Testament place name meaning "house of God" in Hebrew. This was a town north of Jerusalem, where Jacob saw his vision of the stairway. It is occasionally used as a given name.
Betsy f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Bette f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth. A famous bearer was American actress Bette Davis (1908-1989).
Bettie f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Bettina f German, Italian, Hungarian
Diminutive of Elisabeth (German), Benedetta or Elisabetta (Italian), or Erzsébet (Hungarian).
Betty f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Bettye f English
Variant of Betty.
Beulah f Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Means "married" in Hebrew. The name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the land of Israel (Isaiah 62:4). As an English given name, Beulah has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
Bev f English
Short form of Beverly.
Beverley f English
Variant of Beverly.
Beverly f & m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from the name of a Yorkshire city, itself from Old English beofor "beaver" and (possibly) licc "stream". It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, then became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's 1904 novel Beverly of Graustark. It was most popular in the 1930s, and has since greatly declined in use.
Beyoncé f African American (Modern)
Popularized by the American singer Beyoncé Knowles (1981-) whose given name came from her mother's maiden name (which was originally Beyincé, of Louisiana Creole origin). This name appeared on the United States top 1000 list in 2001, around the time her group Destiny's Child was at the height of their popularity.
Bill m English
Short form of William. This spelling was first used in the 19th century. The change in the initial consonant may have been influenced by an earlier Irish pronunciation of the name. Famous bearers include basketball player Bill Russell (1934-2022), comedian Bill Cosby (1937-), American president Bill Clinton (1946-), and Microsoft founder Bill Gates (1955-).
Birdie f English
Diminutive of Bertha, Bernice and other names with a similar sound, or sometimes simply from the English word bird.
Blanca f Spanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan cognate of Blanche.
Blanch f English
Variant of Blanche.
Blanche f French, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair-coloured". This word and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word *blankaz. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
Blessing m & f English (African)
From the English word blessing, of Old English origin. This name is most common in Nigeria, Zimbabwe and other parts of Africa.
Blossom f English
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
Bob m English, Dutch
Short form of Robert. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. It was borne by the character Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel A Christmas Carol (1843). Other famous bearers include American folk musician Bob Dylan (1941-) and Jamaican reggae musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
Bobbi f English
Diminutive of Roberta or Barbara.
Bobbie f & m English
Variant of Bobby. As a feminine name it can be a diminutive of Roberta or Barbara.
Bobby m English
Diminutive of Bob. Hockey greats Bobby Hull (1939-2023) and Bobby Orr (1948-) have borne this name.
Bonita f English
Means "pretty" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin bonus "good". It has been used as a name in the English-speaking world since the beginning of the 20th century.
Booker m English
From an English occupational surname meaning "maker of books". A famous bearer was Booker T. Washington (1856-1915), an African-American leader.
Boris m Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German, French
From a Bulgar Turkic name, also recorded as Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his realm to Christianity and is thus regarded as a saint in the Orthodox Church. To the north in Kievan Rus it was the name of another saint, a son of Vladimir the Great who was murdered with his brother Gleb in the 11th century. His mother may have been Bulgarian.... [more]
Boyce m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old French bois "wood".
Boyd m English
From a Scottish surname that was possibly derived from the name of the island of Bute (Bód in Gaelic).
Brad m English
Short form of Bradley, Bradford and other names beginning with Brad. A famous bearer is American actor Brad Pitt (1963-).
Bradford m English
From an English surname that originally came from a place name that meant "broad ford" in Old English.
Branden m English
Variant of Brandon.
Brandi f English
Variant of Brandy.
Brandy f English
From the English word brandy for the alcoholic drink. It is ultimately from Dutch brandewijn "burnt wine". It has been in use as a given name since the 1960s.
Brant m English
From an English surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name Brandr. This is also the name for a variety of wild geese.
Breann f English (Modern)
Feminine form of Brian.