Names Categorized "fauna"

This is a list of names in which the categories include fauna.
gender
usage
Aarne m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of Arne 1.
Aart m Dutch
Dutch short form of Arnold.
Aderyn f Welsh (Rare)
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
Aetius m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was probably derived from Greek ἀετός (aetos) meaning "eagle". A famous bearer was the 5th-century Roman general Flavius Aetius, who defeated Attila the Hun at the Battle of Chalons.
Aghavni f Armenian
Means "dove" in Armenian.
Agilulf m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and wulf "wolf". This name was borne by a 6th-century king of the Lombards and by an 8th-century bishop of Cologne and saint.
Agnes f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἁγνή (Hagne), derived from Greek ἁγνός (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.... [more]
Agrippa m & f Ancient Roman, Biblical
Roman cognomen of unknown meaning, possibly from a combination of Greek ἄγριος (agrios) meaning "wild" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" or alternatively of Etruscan origin. It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. In the New Testament this name was borne by Herod Agrippa (a grandson of Herod the Great), the king of Israel who put the apostle James to death. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Roman general Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.
Ákos m Hungarian
Possibly of Turkic origin meaning "white falcon". This was the name of a medieval Hungarian clan.
Akvilė f Lithuanian
Lithuanian feminine form of Aquila.
Alcippe f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ἀλκίππη (Alkippe), derived from ἀλκή (alke) meaning "strength" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This was the name of a daughter of Ares in Greek myth. Her father killed Halirrhotis, a son of Poseidon, when he attempted to rape her, leading to a murder trial in which Ares was quickly acquitted.
Alcyone f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀλκυόνη (Alkyone), derived from the word ἀλκυών (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, a group of stars in the constellation Taurus, supposedly the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.
Alisher m Uzbek, Kazakh, Tajik
From the given name Ali 1 combined with Persian شیر (sher) meaning "lion".
Alparslan m Turkish
From Turkish alp meaning "brave" and arslan meaning "lion", referring to the 11th-century Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan, who expanded the Seljuk Empire into Anatolia.
Ane 2 m Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
Anne 2 m Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
Antiman m Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche, from antü "sun" and mañku "condor".
Antinanco m Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "eagle of the sun" in Mapuche, from antü "sun" and ñamko "eagle, hawk, buzzard".
Aquila m & f Biblical, Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen meaning "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
Aquilina f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Aquilinus. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Byblos.
Aquilinus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of Aquila.
Aras m Lithuanian
Means "eagle" in Lithuanian (a poetic word).
Archippe f Ancient Greek
Feminine form of Archippos.
Archippos m Ancient Greek
Means "master of horses" from the Greek elements ἀρχός (archos) meaning "master" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse".
Areli m Biblical
Means "lion of God, hero" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Gad in the Old Testament.
Arend m Dutch, German (Rare)
Dutch and German variant of Arnold. This is also the Dutch word for "eagle".
Ari 1 m Hebrew
Means "lion" in Hebrew.
Ari 2 m Old Norse, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
Aries m Roman Mythology
Means "ram" in Latin. This is the name of a constellation and the first sign of the zodiac. Some Roman legends state that the ram in the constellation was the one who supplied the Golden Fleece sought by Jason.
Arke m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
Arkhip m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Archippos.
Armel m Breton, French
Breton and French form of the Old Welsh name Arthmail, which was composed of the elements arth "bear" and mael "prince, chieftain". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded abbeys in Brittany.
Arn m English
Short form of Arnold.
Arnaldo m Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of Arnold.
Arnar m Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements arn "eagle" and herr "army" or arr "warrior".
Arnau m Catalan
Catalan form of Arnold.
Arnaud m French
French form of Arnold.
Arnaude f French (Rare)
French feminine form of Arnold.
Arnbjörg f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Arnbjǫrg.
Arnbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements arn meaning "eagle" and bjǫrg meaning "help, save, rescue".
Arnborg f Norwegian (Rare)
Norwegian variant form of Arnbjǫrg.
Arnd m German
German short form of Arnold.
Arndt m German
German short form of Arnold.
Arne 2 m German
Diminutive of Arnold.
Arnfinn m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Arnfinnr, which was derived from the elements arn "eagle" and finnr "Sámi, person from Finland".
Arnfinnr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Arnfinn.
Arnfried m German (Rare)
From a Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and frid "peace".
Árni m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Arne 1.
Arnie m English
Diminutive of Arnold.
Arnifrid m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Arnfried.
Arno m Dutch, German
Short form of Arnoud or Arnold.
Arnold m English, German, Dutch, Polish, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
Arnoldas m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Arnold.
Arnoldo m Italian (Rare)
Italian variant of Arnaldo.
Arnolds m Latvian
Latvian form of Arnold.
Arnolfo m Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Arnulf.
Arnoud m Dutch
Dutch form of Arnold.
Arnout m Dutch
Dutch form of Arnold.
Arnt m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Arend.
Arnulf m German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wulf "wolf".
Arnviðr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Arvid.
Arūnas m Lithuanian
Derived from poetic Lithuanian aras meaning "eagle" combined with the patronymic suffix ūnas.
Arve m Norwegian
Variant of Arvid.
Arvid m Swedish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
Arvīds m Latvian
Latvian form of Arvid.
Asad m Arabic, Urdu
Means "lion" in Arabic.
Ásbjörn m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Ásbjǫrn.
Ásbjǫrn m Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements áss "god" and bjǫrn "bear". It is therefore a cognate of Osborn.
Asbjørn m Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish form of Ásbjǫrn.
Aslan m Turkish, Kazakh, Azerbaijani, Chechen, Ossetian, Circassian, Literature
From Turkic arslan meaning "lion". This was a byname or title borne by several medieval Turkic rulers, including the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan (a byname meaning "brave lion") who drove the Byzantines from Anatolia in the 11th century. The author C. S. Lewis later used the name Aslan for the main protagonist (a lion) in his Chronicles of Narnia series of books, first appearing in 1950.
Astor m English (Rare)
From a German and French surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk". The wealthy and influential Astor family, prominent in British and American society, originated in the Italian Alps.
Athaulf m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from atta "father" and wulf "wolf". This was the name of a 5th-century king of the Visigoths.
Avis f English
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
Awinita f Indigenous American, Cherokee
Means "fawn" in Cherokee, derived from ᎠᏫ (awi) meaning "deer".
Ayelet f Hebrew
Means "doe, female deer, gazelle". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
Badulf m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements badu "fight, struggle" and wulf "wolf".
Bakr m Arabic
Means "young camel" in Arabic. Abu Bakr was a father-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad and the first caliph of the Muslim world.
Bambi f English
Derived from Italian bambina meaning "young girl". The American novelist Marjorie Benton Cooke used it in her novel Bambi (1914). This was also the name of a male deer in a cartoon by Walt Disney, which was based on a 1923 novel by Swiss author Felix Salten.
Baugulf m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements bauga meaning "bend, flex" or "ring" and wulf meaning "wolf".
Ben 2 m Dutch
Short form of Bernhard and other Germanic names beginning with the element bern meaning "bear".
Berendina f Dutch
Feminine form of Bernhard.
Bernard m English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
Bernhard m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of Bernard.
Beverly f & m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from the name of a Yorkshire city, itself from Old English beofor "beaver" and (possibly) licc "stream". It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, then became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's 1904 novel Beverly of Graustark. It was most popular in the 1930s, and has since greatly declined in use.
Birdie f English
Diminutive of Bertha, Bernice and other names with a similar sound, or sometimes simply from the English word bird.
Bleddyn m Welsh
From Welsh blaidd "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Gwynedd and Powys.
Boris m Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German, French
From a Bulgar Turkic name, also recorded as Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his realm to Christianity and is thus regarded as a saint in the Orthodox Church. To the north in Kievan Rus it was the name of another saint, a son of Vladimir the Great who was murdered with his brother Gleb in the 11th century. His mother may have been Bulgarian.... [more]
Bradán m Medieval Irish
Means "salmon" in Irish. It could also be formed from Irish brad "thief" and a diminutive suffix.
Bran 1 m Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran mac Febail was a mariner who was involved in several adventures on his quest to find the Otherworld.
Buck m English
From an English nickname meaning simply "buck, male deer", ultimately from Old English bucc.
Cailean m Scottish Gaelic
Means "whelp, young dog" in Scottish Gaelic. This name was borne by Cailean Mór, a 13th-century Scottish lord and ancestor of Clan Campbell.
Caleb m English, Biblical
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.... [more]
Catello m Italian
Italian form of Catellus.
Catellus m Late Roman
Probably from Latin catulus meaning "young dog, puppy". Saint Catellus was a 9th-century bishop of Castellammare, Italy.
Ceren f Turkish
Means "young gazelle" in Turkish.
Ceylan f Turkish
Means "gazelle" in Turkish, of Persian origin.
Chaleb m Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Caleb used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
Chlodulf m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Ludolf.
Conall m Irish, Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "rule of a wolf", from Old Irish "hound, dog, wolf" (genitive con) and fal "rule". This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
Conán m Irish, Old Irish
Irish Gaelic form of Conan.
Connla m Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Conláech, derived from "hound, dog, wolf" (genitive con) and láech "warrior". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including the son of Cúchulainn and Aoife. When he finally met his father they fought because Connla would not identify himself, and the son was slain.
Conor m Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of Conchobar (or the Modern Irish form Conchúr).
Corbin m English
From a French surname that was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).
Crawford m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
Cúán m Old Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Old Irish meaning "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an 8th-century saint.
Cúchulainn m Irish Mythology
Means "hound of Culann" in Irish. This was the usual name of the warrior hero who was named Sétanta at birth, given to him because he took the place of one of Culann's hounds after he accidentally killed it. The Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology tells of Cúchulainn's many adventures, including his single-handed defense of Ulster against the army of Queen Medb.
Damán m Old Irish
Old Irish form of Damhán.
Damhán m Irish
From Old Irish Damán meaning "calf, fawn", derived from dam "ox, deer" and a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an early Irish saint, a brother of Saint Abbán.
Damhnait f Irish
From Old Irish Damnat meaning "calf, fawn", a combination of dam "ox, deer" and a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by a 6th-century saint from Monaghan, as well as the 7th-century saint commonly called Dymphna.
Damnat f Old Irish
Old Irish form of Damhnait.
Devnet f Irish
Anglicized form of Damhnait.
Dorcas f Biblical
Derived from Greek δορκάς (dorkas) meaning "gazelle". This is the Greek translation of the name Tabitha in the New Testament (see Acts 9:36).
Dov m Hebrew
Means "bear" in Hebrew.
Dove f English
From the English word for the variety of bird, seen as a symbol of peace.
Draco m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Δράκων (Drakon), which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
Drake m English
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δράκων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck". A famous bearer is the Canadian actor and rapper Drake (1986-), who was born as Aubrey Drake Graham.
Drakon m Ancient Greek
Greek form of Draco.
Dymphna f History (Ecclesiastical), Irish
Form of Damhnait. According to legend, Saint Dymphna was a young 7th-century woman from Ireland who was martyred by her father in the Belgian town of Geel. She is the patron saint of the mentally ill.
Džejla f Bosnian
Short form of Džejlana.
Džejlana f Bosnian
Bosnian form of Ceylan.
Eadwulf m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman Conquest.
Eardwulf m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".
Elmer m English
From a surname that was derived from the Old English name Æðelmær. In the United States it is sometimes given in honour of brothers Jonathan (1745-1817) and Ebenezer Elmer (1752-1843), who were active in early American politics.
Espen m Norwegian
Variant of Asbjørn.
Ethelinda f English (Archaic)
English form of the Germanic name Adallindis. The name was very rare in medieval times, but it was revived in the early 19th century.
Ezio m Italian
Italian form of Aetius.
Fáelán m Old Irish
Old Irish form of Faolán.
Faolán m Irish (Rare)
Means "little wolf", derived from Old Irish fáel "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint who did missionary work in Scotland.
Fauna f Roman Mythology
Feminine form of Faunus. Fauna was a Roman goddess of fertility, women and healing, a daughter and companion of Faunus.
Fawn f English
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
Fiachra m Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Fiachrae, possibly from fiach "raven" or fích "battle" combined with "king". This was the name of several legendary figures, including one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners: a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France, usually called Saint Fiacre.
Fillin m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Faolán.
Gela m Georgian
Possibly from Georgian მგელი (mgeli) meaning "wolf".
Gerlof m Dutch
Dutch form of Gerulf.
Gerolf m German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
German form of Gerulf, and a Dutch variant of Gerlof.
Gerulf m Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic ger "spear" and wulf "wolf".
Gilles m French
French form of Giles.
Guadalupe f & m Spanish
From a Spanish title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, meaning "Our Lady of Guadalupe". Guadalupe is a Spanish place name, the site of a famous convent, derived from Arabic وادي (wadi) meaning "valley, river" possibly combined with Latin lupus meaning "wolf". In the 16th century Our Lady of Guadalupe supposedly appeared in a vision to a native Mexican man, and she is now regarded as a patron saint of the Americas.
Guntram m German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
Gurgen m Armenian, Georgian
Derived from Middle Persian gurg "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by several Georgian kings and princes.
Haidar m Arabic
Means "lion, warrior" in Arabic. This is a title of Ali, the husband of Fatimah the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad.
Halcyon f Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek ἀλκυών (from the same source as Alcyone).
Hari m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali
Means "brown, yellow, tawny" in Sanskrit, and by extension "monkey, horse, lion". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu, and sometimes of Krishna. It is also borne by the son of the Garuda, the bird-like mount of Vishnu.
Harlan m English
From a surname that was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).
Harley m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing". An American name for boys since the 19th century, it began to be used for girls after a character with the name began appearing on the soap opera Guiding Light in 1987.
Hartley m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English heort "hart, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Hayato m Japanese
From Japanese (haya) meaning "falcon" (using a nanori reading) and (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also make up this name.
Haytham m Arabic
Means "young eagle" in Arabic.
Hersh m Yiddish
Alternate transcription of Yiddish הירש (see Hirsh).
Hippocrates m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἱπποκράτης (Hippokrates) meaning "horse power", derived from the elements ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and κράτος (kratos) meaning "power". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek doctor who is known as the Father of Medicine.
Hippolyta f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Hippolyte 1. Shakespeare used this name in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595).
Hippolyte 1 f Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Hippolytos. In Greek legend Hippolyte was the daughter of Ares, and the queen of the Amazons. She was killed by Herakles in order to obtain her magic girdle.
Hippolytos m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "freer of horses" from Greek ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and λύω (luo) meaning "to loosen". In Greek legend he was the son of Theseus who was tragically loved by his stepmother Phaedra. This was also the name of a 3rd-century theologian, saint and martyr.
Horst m German
Means "wood, thicket" in German. Alternatively, it may derive from the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse".
Hrafn m Icelandic, Old Norse
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
Hrodulf m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Rudolf.
Hrolf m Ancient Germanic
Contracted form of Hrodulf.
Hrólfr m Old Norse
Contracted form of Hróðólfr.
Hroðulf m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodulf (see Rudolf). This name appears in Beowulf belonging to the nephew of Hroðgar.
Hulda 2 f Biblical
Variant of Huldah.
Huldah f Biblical
Means "weasel, mole" in Hebrew. This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to a prophetess.
Humbert m French, German (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Ingolf m Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingólfr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god Ing combined with úlfr meaning "wolf".
Ingólfr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Ingolf.
Ingulf m Ancient Germanic
Germanic cognate of Ingólfr.
Ivailo m Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Bulgarian Ивайло (see Ivaylo).
Ivayla f Bulgarian
Feminine form of Ivaylo.
Ivaylo m Bulgarian
Perhaps derived from an old Bulgar name meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 13th-century emperor of Bulgaria. It is possible that this spelling was the result of a 15th-century misreading of his real name Vulo from historical documents.
Jael f Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
Jelena f Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Lithuanian
Form of Yelena in several languages. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".
Jonah m English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.... [more]
Kaleb m English (Modern)
English variant of Caleb.
Kalev 2 m Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of Caleb.
Khulan f Mongolian
Means "onager, wild donkey" in Mongolian. This was the name of a wife of Genghis Khan.
Kimimela f Indigenous American, Sioux
From Lakota kimímela meaning "butterfly".
Kit m & f English
Diminutive of Christopher or Katherine. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
Lark f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
Leah f English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah), which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might be related to Akkadian littu meaning "cow". In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's younger sister Rachel, whom he preferred. Leah later offered Jacob her handmaid Zilpah in order for him to conceive more children.... [more]
Lencho m Eastern African, Oromo
Means "lion" in Oromo.
Leonidas m Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λέων (leon) meaning "lion" combined with the patronymic suffix ἴδης (ides). Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life and his army defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.
Leonie f German, Dutch
German and Dutch feminine form of Leonius.
Leonius m Late Roman
Late Latin name that was derived from Leo.
Leopold m German, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel Ulysses (1922).
Leukippos m Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "white horse", derived from Greek λευκός (leukos) meaning "white, bright" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This name was borne by a 5th-century BC Greek philosopher, as well as by several characters in Greek mythology.
Lope m Spanish
Spanish form of Lupus (see Loup).
Lopo m Portuguese (Rare)
Portuguese form of Lupus (see Loup).
Loup m French
French form of the Roman name Lupus meaning "wolf". Lupus was the name of several early saints, including a 5th-century bishop of Troyes who apparently convinced Attila to spare the city.
Lowell m English
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman French nickname, from lou "wolf" and a diminutive suffix. The surname was borne by American poet and satirist James Russell Lowell (1819-1891).
Lupe f & m Spanish
Short form of Guadalupe.
Lupita f Spanish
Diminutive of Guadalupe.
Lupus m Ancient Roman
Original Latin form of Loup.
Lyall m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name Liulfr (which was derived in part from úlfr "wolf").
Lycurgus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυκοῦργος (Lykourgos), derived from λύκος (lykos) meaning "wolf" and ἔργον (ergon) meaning "work, deed". In Greek legend this was the name of a king who was driven mad by the gods because of his impiety. This was also the name of a Spartan legislator of the 9th century BC.
Lycus m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύκος (Lykos) meaning "wolf". This name was borne by several characters in Greek mythology including a legendary ruler of Thebes.
Lyonesse f Arthurian Romance
Means "lioness" in Middle English. In Thomas Malory's 15th-century tale Le Morte d'Arthur this is the name of a woman trapped in a castle by the Red Knight. Her sister Lynet gains the help of the knight Gareth in order to save her.
Lyonors f Arthurian Romance
Probably from Middle English lyon meaning "lion". It appears in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends Le Morte d'Arthur, belonging to a woman who had a child with Arthur. Alfred Tennyson used the name in his poem Gareth and Lynette (1872) for the sister of Lynette (this character is called Lyonesse in Malory's version of the story).
Mahon m Irish
Anglicized form of Mathúin.
Math m Welsh Mythology
Possibly from the old Celtic root *matus meaning "bear". According to the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi, Math ap Mathonwy was a king of Gwynedd and a magician. Whenever he was not at war, it was required that he rest his feet in the lap of a virgin. He was the uncle of the hero Gwydion, with whom he shared most of his adventures.
Mathgamain m Old Irish
Means "bear" in Old Irish, a compound of math, itself meaning "bear", and gamuin meaning "calf". This was the name of a brother of the Irish king Brian Boru.
Mathúin m Irish (Rare)
Modern Irish form of Mathgamain.
Melissa f English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "bee" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a daughter of Procles, as well as an epithet of various Greek nymphs and priestesses. According to the early Christian writer Lactantius this was the name of the sister of the nymph Amalthea, with whom she cared for the young Zeus. Later it appears in Ludovico Ariosto's 1516 poem Orlando Furioso belonging to the fairy who helps Ruggiero escape from the witch Alcina. As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
Merel f Dutch
Means "blackbird" in Dutch.
Merle f & m English, Estonian
Variant of Merrill or Muriel. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula). This name is also common in Estonia, though a connection to the English-language name is uncertain.
Nöl m Limburgish
Limburgish short form of Arnold.
Nölke m Limburgish
Limburgish diminutive of Arnold.
Oisín m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "little deer", derived from Old Irish oss "deer, stag" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhaill and the narrator in many of his tales.
Ophrah m Biblical
Means "fawn" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a man mentioned in genealogies and a city in Manasseh.
Osbeorn m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Osborn.
Osborn m English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjǫrn used in England, and after the Norman Conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
Paloma f Spanish
Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.
Peregrine m English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
Phelan m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Faolán.
Philip m English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Greek name Φίλιππος (Philippos) meaning "friend of horses", composed of the elements φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.... [more]
Philipa f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Philip.
Philippa f English (British), German
Latinate feminine form of Philip. As an English name, it is chiefly British.
Phillip m English
Variant of Philip, inspired by the usual spelling of the surname.
Phillipa f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of Philip.
Philomel f Literature
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from Philomela). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
Phineas m Biblical
Variant of Phinehas used in some English versions of the Old Testament.
Phinehas m Biblical
Probably means "Nubian" from the Egyptian name Panhsj, though some believe it means "serpent's mouth" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament Phinehas is a grandson of Aaron who kills an Israelite because he is intimate with a Midianite woman, thus stopping a plague sent by God. Also in the Bible this is the son of Eli, killed in battle with the Philistines.
Quetzalcoatl m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and cōātl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
Rachel f English, Hebrew, French, Dutch, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob. Her father Laban tricked Jacob into marrying her older sister Leah first, though in exchange for seven years of work Laban allowed Jacob to marry Rachel too. Initially barren and facing her husband's anger, she offered her handmaid Bilhah to Jacob to bear him children. Eventually she was herself able to conceive, becoming the mother of Joseph and Benjamin.... [more]
Radulf m Ancient Germanic
Germanic cognate of Ráðúlfr.
Rafe m English
Variant of Ralph. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
Raleigh m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning either "red clearing" or "roe deer clearing" in Old English. A city in North Carolina bears this name, after the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618).
Ralph m English, German, Swedish
Contracted form of the Old Norse name Ráðúlfr (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman Conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
Ralphie m English
Diminutive of Ralph.
Randolf m English
From the Germanic elements rand meaning "rim (of a shield)" and wulf meaning "wolf". The Normans brought this name to England, where there existed already an Old Norse cognate Randúlfr, which had been introduced by Scandinavian settlers. Randolf became rare after the Middle Ages, though it was revived in the 18th century (usually in the spelling Randolph).
Randolph m English
Variant of Randolf. This spelling was adopted in the 18th century.
Randúlfr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Randolf.
Ranulf m Medieval English
Medieval English form of the Old Norse name Randúlfr, a cognate of Randolf. Scandinavian settlers and invaders introduced this name to northern England and Scotland.
Raoul m French, Italian
French form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Rasha f Arabic
Means "young gazelle" in Arabic.
Ráðúlfr m Old Norse
Derived from the Norse elements ráð meaning "counsel" and úlfr meaning "wolf".
Raúl m Spanish
Spanish form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Raül m Catalan
Catalan form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Raul m Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Estonian
Portuguese, Italian, Romanian and Estonian form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Raven f & m English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
Rhea f Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to ῥέω (rheo) meaning "to flow" or ἔρα (era) meaning "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
Robin m & f English, French, Dutch, Swedish, Czech
Medieval English diminutive of Robert, now usually regarded as an independent name. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
Rodolfito m Spanish (Rare)
Spanish diminutive of Rodolfo.
Rodolfo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Rudolf. This is the name of the hero in Puccini's opera La Bohème (1896).
Rodolphe m French
French form of Rudolf.
Roelof m Dutch
Dutch form of Rudolf.
Roffe m Swedish
Swedish diminutive of Rolf.
Rolf m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see Rudolf). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
Rollo m English
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of Rolf. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
Ronne m Frisian
Frisian short form of Germanic names beginning with the element hraban meaning "raven".
Roscoe m English
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, itself derived from Old Norse "roebuck" and skógr "wood, forest".
Rosella f Italian
Italian diminutive of Rosa 1.
Roswell m English
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "horse spring".
Roul m Medieval French, Medieval English
Norman French form of Rolf.
Rudolf m German, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Dutch, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel The Prisoner of Zenda (1894).
Rūdolfs m Latvian
Latvian form of Rudolf.
Rudolph m English
English form of Rudolf, imported from Germany in the 19th century. Robert L. May used it in 1939 for his Christmas character Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
Sandalio m Spanish
Spanish form of Sandalius, a Latinized form of the Gothic name Sandulf meaning "true wolf", derived from sand "true" and ulf "wolf". This was the name of a 9th-century Spanish saint martyred by the Moors.
Sequoyah m Indigenous American, Cherokee
Probably derived from Cherokee ᏏᏆ (siqua) meaning "hog". This was the name of the Cherokee man (also known as George Guess) who devised the Cherokee writing system in the 19th century.
Shaw m English (Rare)
From a surname. As an English surname it is derived from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket". As a Scottish surname it is derived from the Gaelic byname Sitheach meaning "wolf".
Sher m Urdu, Pashto
Means "lion" in Persian. A famous bearer of this name was Sher Shah, a 16th-century Mughal ruler.
Shqipe f Albanian
From Albanian shqip meaning "Albanian". Additionally, the word shqipe means "eagle" in modern Albanian, a variant of older shkabë. These interrelated words are often the subject of competing claims that the one is derived from the other. The ultimate origin of shqip "Albanian" is uncertain, but it may be from shqipoj meaning "to say clearly".
Sítheach m Medieval Irish
Means "peaceful" or "fairy-like" in Irish, from Old Irish síd. Alternatively, it could be from sídach "wolf".
Sparrow m & f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
Stithulf m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements stiþ "hard, stiff" and wulf "wolf".
Suzume f Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese (suzume) meaning "sparrow", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that are pronounced the same way.
Svana f Icelandic
Short form of Svanhildur.
Svanhildur f Icelandic
Icelandic form of Svanhild.
Swanahilda f Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Swanhild.
Swanhild f German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements swan "swan" and hild "battle".
Tabita f Biblical Latin
Latin form of Tabitha.
Tabitha f English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show Bewitched, in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.
Tahlako m Indigenous American, Choctaw
Means "eagle" in Choctaw.
Þórarinn m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with arn "eagle".
Todd m English
From an English surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde. As a given name it was rare before 1930. It peaked in popularity in most parts of the English-speaking world in the 1960s or 70s, but it has since declined.
Turgay m Turkish
Means "skylark" in Turkish.
Tzivia f Hebrew
Modern Hebrew form of Zibiah.