Names Categorized "Flipline Studios characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include Flipline Studios characters.
gender
usage
Akari f Japanese
From Japanese (aka) meaning "bright" or (aka) meaning "vermilion red" combined with (ri) meaning "village" or (ri) meaning "white jasmine". Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
Alberto m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Albert.
Allan m English, Scottish, Danish, Swedish, Estonian
Variant of Alan. The American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) got his middle name from the surname of the parents who adopted him.
Amy f English
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
Austin m English
Medieval contracted form of Augustine 1. Modern use of the name is probably also partly inspired by the common surname Austin, which is of the same origin. This is also the name of a city in Texas.
Bertha f German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
Bill m English
Short form of William. This spelling was first used in the 19th century. The change in the initial consonant may have been influenced by an earlier Irish pronunciation of the name. Famous bearers include basketball player Bill Russell (1934-), comedian Bill Cosby (1937-), American president Bill Clinton (1946-), and Microsoft founder Bill Gates (1955-).
Brody m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
Bruna f Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Feminine form of Bruno.
Carlo m Italian
Italian form of Charles.
Cecilia f English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
Chester m English
From a surname that originally belonged to a person who came from Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
Chuck m English
Diminutive of Charles. It originated in America in the early 20th century. Two famous bearers of this name were pilot Chuck Yeager (1923-), the first man to travel faster than the speed of sound, and the musician Chuck Berry (1926-2017), one of the pioneers of rock music.
Clair m French, English
French form of Clarus (see Clara).
Cletus m English
Short form of Anacletus. This name is sometimes used to refer to the third pope, Saint Anacletus. It can also function as an Anglicized form of Kleitos.
Clover f English (Rare)
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
Cooper m English
From a surname meaning "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
Cori f English
Feminine form of Corey.
Crystal f English
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρύσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
Edna 1 f Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Eithne.
Edoardo m Italian
Italian form of Edward.
Elle f English (Modern)
Diminutive of Eleanor and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".
Ember f English (Modern)
From the English word ember, ultimately from Old English æmerge.
Evelyn f & m English, German
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Aveline. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
Fernanda f Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian feminine form of Ferdinand.
Fitz m English (Rare)
Short form of various given names that are derived from surnames beginning with Norman French fitz meaning "son of" (for example Fitzroy).
Franco m Italian, Ancient Germanic
Italian form of Frank, also used as a short form of the related name Francesco.
Gino m Italian
Italian short form of names ending in gino.
Greg m English
Short form of Gregory.
Hank m English
Originally a short form of Hankin, which was a medieval diminutive of John. Since the 17th century in the United States this name has also been used as a diminutive of Henry, probably under the influence of the Dutch diminutive Henk. A famous bearer is the American former baseball player Hank Aaron (1934-).
Hope f English
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Hugo m Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Hugh. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of The Hunchback of Notre-Dame and Les Misérables.
Iggy m English
Diminutive of Ignatius.
Indigo f & m English (Rare)
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ἰνδικὸν (Indikon) meaning "Indic, from India".
Ivy f English
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
James m English, Biblical
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus, a variant of the Biblical Latin form Iacobus, from the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see Jacob). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.... [more]
Johnny m English
Diminutive of John. A famous bearer is American actor Johnny Depp (1963-).
Jojo m & f English
Diminutive of Joseph, Jolene and other names that begin with Jo.
Joy f English
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
Kaleb m English (Modern)
English variant of Caleb.
Kasey m & f English
Variant of Casey.
Kayla f English
Combination of Kay 1 and the popular name suffix la. Use of the name was greatly increased in the 1980s after the character Kayla Brady began appearing on the American soap opera Days of Our Lives.
Kenji m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or (ken) meaning "study, sharpen" combined with (ji) meaning "two". This name can also be formed from other combinations of kanji characters.
Kenton m English
From a surname that was derived from an English place name meaning either "town on the River Kenn" or "royal town" in Old English.
Kingsley m English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's wood" in Old English.
Lisa f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of Elizabeth and its cognates in other languages. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the Mona Lisa, the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.... [more]
Louie m English
Diminutive of Louis.
Maggie f English
Diminutive of Margaret.
Mandi f English
Diminutive of Amanda.
Marty m English
Diminutive of Martin.
Mary f English, Biblical
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριάμ (Mariam) and Μαρία (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".... [more]
Matt m English
Short form of Matthew.
Mindy f English
Diminutive of Melinda.
Mitch m English
Short form of Mitchell.
Moe 1 m English
Short form of Maurice or Morris, or sometimes of other names beginning with a similar sound.
Nevada f & m English
From the name of the American state, which means "snow-capped" in Spanish.
Nick m English, Dutch
Short form of Nicholas.
Nye m Welsh
Diminutive of Aneirin.
Olga f Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of Helga. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
Olivia f English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time that may have been based on Oliva or Oliver, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
Peggy f English
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of Margaret. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
Penny f English
Diminutive of Penelope.
Petrona f Spanish
Possibly a feminine form of Petronius.
Prudence f & m English, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of Prudentius. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
Quinn m & f Irish, English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of Conn".
Rhonda f English
Probably intended to mean "good spear" from Welsh rhon "spear" and da "good", but possibly influenced by the name of the Rhondda Valley in South Wales, which means "noisy". It has been in use only since the 20th century. Its use may have been partially inspired by Margaret Mackworth, Viscountess Rhondda (1883-1956), a British feminist.
Rico m Spanish, Italian
Short form of Ricardo, Enrico and other names ending in rico.
Ripley f & m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the name of various English towns, from Old English ripel "strip of land" and leah "clearing". A famous fictional bearer was the character Ellen Ripley (usually only called by her surname) from the Alien series of movies, beginning 1979.
Rita f Italian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese, Latvian, Lithuanian
Short form of Margherita and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
Robby m English
Diminutive of Robert.
Roy m Scottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of Ruadh. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
Rudy m English
Diminutive of Rudolf.
Sasha m & f Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of Aleksandr or Aleksandra.
Scarlett f English
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrelat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
Scout f English (Rare)
From the English word scout meaning "one who gathers information covertly", which is derived from Old French escouter "to listen". Harper Lee used this name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960).
Shannon f & m English
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha an tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient". As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.
Sienna f English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.
Simone 1 f French, English, German, Dutch, Danish, Portuguese
French feminine form of Simon 1. A famous bearer was Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
Skyler m & f English (Modern)
Variant of Schuyler. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.
Steven m English, Dutch
Medieval English variant of Stephen, and a Dutch variant of Stefan. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of E.T. and Indiana Jones, is a famous bearer of this name.
Sue f English
Short form of Susanna.
Taylor m & f English
From an English surname that originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by the British-American author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
Tony m English
Short form of Anthony.
Trishna f Indian, Hindi
Means "thirst, desire" in Sanskrit.
Vicky f English
Diminutive of Victoria.
Vincent m English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was derived from Latin vincere meaning "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
Wally m English
Diminutive of Walter or Wallace.
Wendy f English
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name Gwendolen and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.
Willow f English (Modern)
From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.
Xandra f Dutch
Short form of Alexandra.
Yui f Japanese
From Japanese (yu) meaning "tie, bind" or (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" combined with (i) meaning "clothing, garment". It can also come from standalone (yui) using a different nanori reading. This name can be formed of other kanji or kanji combinations as well.
Zac m English
Short form of Zachary.
Zoe f English, Italian, German, Czech, Ancient Greek
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of Eve. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under Emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century.... [more]