English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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ROWLAND m English
Medieval variant of ROLAND.
ROWLEY m English
Variant of ROLY.
ROXANA f English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of Ρωξανη (Roxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak), which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel 'Roxana' (1724).
ROXANE f French, English, Ancient Greek
French and English form of ROXANA. This is the name of Cyrano's love interest in the play 'Cyrano de Bergerac' (1897).
ROXANNA f English
Variant of ROXANA.
ROXIE f English
Diminutive of ROXANA.
ROXY f English
Diminutive of ROXANA.
ROY m Scottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of RUADH. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
ROYAL m English
From the English word royal, derived (via Old French) from Latin regalis, a derivative of rex "king". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century.
ROYCE m English
From a surname that was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of ROSE.
ROYDON m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye hill", from Old English ryge "rye" and dun "hill".
ROYLE m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "rye hill" from Old English ryge "rye" and hyll "hill".
ROYSTON m English (British)
From a surname that was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "town of Royse". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of ROSE.
ROZ f English
Short form of ROSALIND, ROSAMUND, and other names beginning with the same sound.
ROZANNE f English
Variant of ROSANNE.
RUBE m English
Short form of REUBEN.
RUBY f English
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RUBYE f English
Variant of RUBY.
RUDOLPH m English
English form of RUDOLF, imported from Germany in the 19th century. Robert L. May used it in 1939 for his Christmas character Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
RUDY m English
Diminutive of RUDOLF.
RUDYARD m English (Rare)
From a place name meaning "red yard" in Old English. This name was borne by Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), the author of 'The Jungle Book' and other works, who was named after Rudyard Lake in Staffordshire.
RUE f English
From the name of the bitter medicinal herb, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘ρυτη (rhyte). This is also sometimes used as a short form of RUTH (1).
RUFUS m Ancient Roman, English, Biblical
Roman cognomen meaning "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.
RUPERT m German, Dutch, English
German variant form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.
RUSS m English
Short form of RUSSELL.
RUSSEL m English
Variant of RUSSELL.
RUSSELL m English
From a surname meaning "little red one" in French. A notable bearer of the surname was the agnostic British philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who wrote on many subjects including logic, epistemology and mathematics. He was also a political activist for causes such as pacifism and women's rights.
RUSTY m English
From a nickname that was originally given to someone with a rusty, or reddish-brown, hair colour.
RUTH (1) f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Hebrew name that was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.... [more]
RUTHIE f English
Diminutive of RUTH (1).
RYAN m Irish, English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
RYANA f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of RYAN.
RYANN f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RYAN.
RYANNE f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of RYAN.
RYDER m English (Modern)
From an English occupational surname derived from Old English ridere meaning "mounted warrior" or "messenger".
RYKER m English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the German surname Riker, a derivative of Low German rike "rich". It may have been altered by association with the popular name prefix Ry.
RYLAN m English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the English surname Ryland, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.
RYLEE f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
RYLEIGH f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
RYLIE f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
SABLE f English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.
SABRINA f English, Italian, German, French
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque 'Comus' (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play 'Sabrina Fair' (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.
SACHEVERELL m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a Norman place name. It was occasionally given in honour of preacher Henry Sacheverell (1674-1724).
SADIE f English
Diminutive of SARAH.
SAFFRON f English (Rare)
From the English word that refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".
SAGE f & m English (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SAL f & m English
Short form of SALLY, SALVADOR, and other names beginning with Sal.
SALENA f English (Modern)
Perhaps an invented name based on similar-sounding names such as SELINA.
SALINA f English
Perhaps an invented name based on similar-sounding names such as SELINA.
SALLIE f English
Diminutive of SARAH.
SALLY f English
Diminutive of SARAH.
SALOME f English, German, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From an Aramaic name that was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee). In the New Testament, though a specific name is not given, it was a daughter of Herodias who danced for Herod and was rewarded with the head of John the Baptist, and thus Salome and the dancer have traditionally been equated.... [more]
SAM (1) m & f English
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SAMANTHA f English, Italian, Dutch
Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of SAMUEL, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show 'Bewitched'.
SAMARA f English (Modern), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Possibly derived from the name of the city of Samarra (in Iraq) or Samara (in Russia). The former appears in the title of the novel 'Appointment in Samarra' (1934) by John O'Hara, which refers to an ancient Babylonian legend about a man trying to evade death. Alternatively, this name could be derived from the word for the winged seeds that grow on trees such as maples and elms.... [more]
SAMMI f English (Rare)
Diminutive of SAMANTHA.
SAMMIE f & m English
Diminutive of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SAMMY m & f English
Diminutive of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SAMPSON (2) m English
From an English surname that was itself derived from a medieval form of the given name SAMSON.
SAMSON m Biblical, English, French, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name שִׁמְשׁוֹן (Shimshon), derived from שֶׁמֶשׁ (shemesh) meaning "sun". Samson was an Old Testament hero granted exceptional strength by God. His mistress Delilah betrayed him and cut his hair, stripping him of his power. Thus he was captured by the Philistines, blinded, and brought to their temple. However, in a final act of strength, he pulled down the pillars of the temple upon himself and his captors.... [more]
SAMUEL m English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el), which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.... [more]
SANDFORD m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of SANFORD.
SANDIE f English
Variant of SANDY.
SANDRA f Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Romanian
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887). A famous bearer is the American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).
SANDY m & f English
Originally a diminutive of ALEXANDER. As a feminine name it is a diminutive of ALEXANDRA or SANDRA. It can also be given in reference to the colour.
SANFORD m English
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "sand ford" in Old English.
SAPPHIRE f English (Rare)
From the name of the gemstone, the blue birthstone of September, which is derived from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros), ultimately from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir).
SARAH f English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became the pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).... [more]
SARANNA f English (Rare)
Combination of SARAH and ANNA, in occasional use since the 18th century.
SARINA f Dutch, English (Modern)
Diminutive of SARA. In modern times it may also be a variant of SERENA.
SASHA m & f Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
SATCHEL m English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Old English sacc meaning "sack, bag", referring to a person who was a bag maker.
SAVANNAH f English
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie 'Savannah Smiles' (1982).
SAWYER m English (Modern)
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).
SAXON m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the name of the Germanic tribe the Saxons, ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife". This name can also be given in direct reference to the tribe.
SCARLET f English (Modern)
Either a variant of SCARLETT or else from the English word for the red colour (both of the same origin, a type of cloth).
SCARLETT f English
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SCHUYLER m English
From a Dutch surname meaning "scholar". Dutch settlers brought the surname to America, where it was subsequently adopted as a given name in honour of the American general and senator Philip Schuyler (1733-1804).
SCOT m English, Scottish
Variant form of SCOTT.
SCOTT m English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname that referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.
SCOTTIE m English, Scottish
Diminutive of SCOTT.
SCOTTY m English, Scottish
Diminutive of SCOTT.
SCOUT f English (Rare)
From the English word scout meaning "one who gathers information covertly", which is derived from Old French escouter "to listen". Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).
SEAN m Irish, English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SEANNA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of SEÁN.
SEBASTIAN m German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian, Czech
From the Latin name Sebastianus, which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.... [more]
SEFTON m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "town in the rushes" in Old English.
SELA f English (Rare)
From the name of a city, the capital of Edom, which appears in the Old Testament. It means "rock" in Hebrew.
SELBY m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
SELINA f English
Possibly a variant of CÉLINE or SELENE. As an English name, it first came into use in the 17th century.
SELMA (1) f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.
SELWYN m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from an Old English given name, which was formed of the elements sele "manor" and wine "friend".
SEPTEMBER f & m English (Rare)
From the name of the ninth month (though it means "seventh month" in Latin, since it was originally the seventh month of the Roman year), which is sometimes used as a given name for someone born in September.
SEQUOIA f & m English (Rare)
From the name of huge trees that grow in California. The tree got its name from the 19th-century Cherokee scholar Sequoyah (also known as George Guess), the inventor of the Cherokee writing system.
SERA f English (Rare)
Either a variant of SARAH or a short form of SERAPHINA.
SERAPHINA f English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim, which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.
SERENA f English, Italian, Late Roman
From a Late Latin name that was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
SERENITY f English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "serenity, tranquility", ultimately from Latin serenus meaning "clear, calm".
SERINA f English
Variant of SERENA.
SETH (1) m English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve, and the ancestor of Noah and all humankind. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
SEWARD m English
From a surname that was itself derived from the Old English given name SIGEWEARD.
SEYMOUR m English
From a Norman surname that originally belonged to a person coming from the French town of Saint Maur (which means "Saint MAURUS").
SHAD (2) m English
Perhaps a variant of CHAD.
SHAE f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of SHEA.
SHAELYN f English (Rare)
Combination of SHAE and LYNN.
SHANA (1) f English
Variant of SHANNA.
SHANAE f English (Modern)
Elaboration of the popular name element Shan.
SHANE m Irish, English
Anglicized form of SEÁN. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie 'Shane' (1953).
SHANENE f English (Rare)
Combination of the popular name elements Shan and ene.
SHANIA f English (Modern)
In the case of singer Shania Twain (1965-), who chose it as her stage name, she has claimed it was based on an Ojibwe phrase meaning "on my way". This appears to be untrue.
SHANNA f English
Possibly a feminine variant of SHANNON.
SHANNON f & m English
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha an tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient". As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.
SHANON f & m English
Variant of SHANNON.
SHANTEL f English
Variant of CHANTEL.
SHAQUILLE m English (Modern)
Variant of SHAKIL. This name is borne by basketball player Shaquille O'Neal (1972-).
SHARI f English
Diminutive of SHARON or a variant of SHERRY.
SHARLA f English
Variant of CHARLA.
SHARON f English
From an Old Testament place name, in Hebrew שָׁרוֹן (Sharon), which means "plain", referring to the fertile plain near the coast of Israel. This is also the name of a type of flowering shrub, the rose of Sharon. It has been in use as a given name since the 1920s, possibly inspired by the heroine in the serial novel 'The Skyrocket' (1925) by Adela Rogers St. Johns.
SHARONA f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of SHARON.
SHARRON f English
Variant of SHARON.
SHARYL f English
Variant of CHERYL.
SHARYN f English
Variant of SHARON.
SHAUN m English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAUNA f English
Feminine form of SHAUN.
SHAVONNE f Irish, English
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHAW (1) m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket".
SHAWN m English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAWNA f English
Feminine form of SHAWN.
SHAWNDA f English
Variant of SHONDA.
SHAWNEE f English (Modern)
Means "southern people" in the Algonquin language. The Shawnee were an Algonquin tribe who originally lived in the Ohio valley.
SHAYE f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of SHEA.
SHAYLA f English
Variant of SHEILA, influenced by the spelling and sound of KAYLA.
SHAYLYN f English (Rare)
Combination of SHAE and LYNN.
SHAYNE m English
Variant of SHANE.
SHEARD m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "gap between hills" in Old English.
SHEENA f Scottish, English
Anglicized form of SÌNE. This name was popularized outside of Scotland in the 1980s by the singer Sheena Easton (1959-).
SHEILA f Irish, English
Anglicized form of SÍLE.
SHEL m English
Short form of SHELDON.
SHELBY m & f English
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935). It was later reinforced by the movie 'Steel Magnolias' (1989) in which Julia Roberts played a character by this name.
SHELDON m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "valley with steep sides" in Old English. Sheldon is the name of several locations in England.
SHELIA f English
Variant of SHEILA.
SHELL f English
Short form of MICHELLE or SHELLEY. It can also be simply from the English word shell (ultimately from Old English sciell).
SHELLEY f & m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "clearing on a bank" in Old English. Two famous bearers of the surname were Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), a romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias', and Mary Shelley (1797-1851), his wife, the author of the horror story 'Frankenstein'. As a feminine given name, it came into general use after the 1940s.
SHELLY f & m English
Variant of SHELLEY.
SHELTON m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
SHEREE f English
Variant of SHERRY. This particular spelling was popularized by American actress Sheree North (1932-2005), who was born Dawn Shirley Crang.
SHERI f English
Variant of SHERRY.
SHERIDAN m & f English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Sirideáin meaning "descendant of Sirideán". The name Sirideán means "searcher" in Gaelic.
SHERIE f English
Variant of SHERRY.
SHERMAN m English
From a surname meaning "shear man" in Old English, originally denoting a person who cut cloth. Famous bearers of the surname include American politician Roger Sherman (1721-1793) and American Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891).
SHERRI f English
Variant of SHERRY.
SHERRIE f English
Variant of SHERRY.
SHERRY f English
Before the 20th century this was probably from the Irish surname Ó Searraigh meaning "descendant of Searrach" (a name meaning "foal" in Gaelic). Later it may have been reinforced by the French word chérie meaning "darling", or the English word sherry, a type of fortified wine named from the Spanish town of Jerez. This name came into popular use during the 1920s, inspired by other similar-sounding names and by Collette's novels 'Chéri' (1920, English translation 1929) and 'The Last of Chéri' (1926, English translation 1932), in which it is a masculine name.
SHERWOOD m English
From an English place name (or from a surname that was derived from it) meaning "bright forest". This was the name of the forest in which the legendary outlaw Robin Hood made his home.
SHERYL f English
Variant of CHERYL.
SHERYLL f English
Variant of CHERYL.
SHEVAUN f Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHEVON f Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHIRLEE f English
Variant of SHIRLEY.
SHIRLEY f & m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel 'Shirley' (1849). The child actress Shirley Temple (1928-2014) helped to popularize this name.
SHONDA f English
Probably a blend of SHONA and RHONDA.
SIBYL f English
From Greek Σιβυλλα (Sibylla), meaning "prophetess, sibyl". In Greek and Roman legend the sibyls were ten female prophets who practiced at different holy sites in the ancient world. In later Christian theology, the sibyls were thought to have divine knowledge and were revered in much the same way as the Old Testament prophets. Because of this, the name came into general use in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was spelled both Sibyl and Sybil. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps helped by Benjamin Disraeli's novel 'Sybil' (1845).
SID m English
Short form of SIDNEY.
SIDNEY m & f English
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683). Another notable bearer of the surname was the poet and statesman Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).
SIDONY f English (Archaic)
Feminine form of SIDONIUS. This name was in use in the Middle Ages, when it became associated with the word sindon (of Greek origin) meaning "linen", a reference to the Shroud of Turin.
SIENA f English (Modern)
Variant of SIENNA, with the spelling perhaps influenced by that of the Italian city.
SIENNA f English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.
SIERRA f English (Modern)
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.
SIGMUND m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SILAS m English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).... [more]
SILVER m & f English (Rare)
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
SILVESTER m Dutch, English, Slovene, Slovak, German, Late Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
SILVIA f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SIMON (1) m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) meaning "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).... [more]
SIMONE (1) f French, English
French feminine form of SIMON (1). A famous bearer was Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
SINCLAIR m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR". A notable bearer was the American author Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951).
SINJIN m English (Rare)
Variant of the name St. John (see JOHN).
SISSIE f English
Variant of SISSY.
SISSY f English
Diminutive of CECILIA, FRANCES or PRISCILLA. It can also be taken from the nickname, which originated as a nursery form of the word sister.
SKY f & m English (Modern)
Simply from the English word sky, which was ultimately derived from Old Norse sky "cloud".
SKYE f English (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SKYLA f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of SKYLER, formed using the popular name suffix la.
SKYLAR m & f English (Modern)
Variant of SKYLER.
SKYLER m & f English (Modern)
Variant of SCHUYLER. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.
SLADE m English (Modern)
From a surname that meant "valley" in Old English.
SLOAN f & m English (Modern)
Variant of SLOANE.
SLOANE f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
SLY m English
Short form of SYLVESTER. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a well-known bearer of this nickname.
SMITH m English
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
SOLOMON m Biblical, English, Jewish
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh), which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". As told in the Old Testament, Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David and Bathsheba. He was renowned for his wisdom and wealth. Towards the end of his reign he angered God by turning to idolatry. Supposedly, he was the author of the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon.... [more]
SOMMER f English (Modern)
Variant of SUMMER, coinciding with the German word for summer.
SONDRA f English
Variant of SAUNDRA. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character in Theodore Dreiser's novel 'An American Tragedy' (1925) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1931).
SONNY m English
From a nickname that is commonly used to denote a young boy, derived from the English word son.
SONYA f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of SOPHIA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1869, English translation 1886).
SOPHIA f English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
SOPHIE f French, English, German, Dutch
French form of SOPHIA.
SOPHY f English (Rare)
Variant of SOPHIE or a diminutive of SOPHIA.
SORREL f English (Rare)
From the name of the sour tasting plant, which may ultimately derive from Germanic sur "sour".
SPARROW m & f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
SPENCER m English
From a surname that meant "dispenser of provisions", derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry". A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).
SPIKE m English (Rare)
From a nickname that may have originally been given to a person with spiky hair.
SPIRIT f English (Rare)
From the English word spirit, ultimately from Latin spiritus "breath", a derivative of spirare "to blow".
SPRING f English
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English springan "to leap, to burst forth".
STACE m & f Medieval English, English
Medieval short form of EUSTACE. As a modern name it is typically a short form of STACY.
STACEE f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of STACY.
STACEY f & m English
Variant of STACY.
STACI f English
Feminine variant of STACY.
STACIA f English
Short form of ANASTASIA or EUSTACIA.
STACIE f English
Feminine variant of STACY.
STACY f & m English
Either a diminutive of ANASTASIA, or else from a surname that was derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE. As a feminine name, it came into general use during the 1950s, though it had earlier been in use as a rare masculine name.
STAFFORD m English
From a surname that was from a place name meaning "landing-place ford" in Old English.
STAN (1) m English
Short form of STANLEY. A famous bearer was British comedian Stan Laurel (1890-1965).
STANFORD m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
STANLEY m English
From a surname meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), the man who found David Livingstone in Africa. As a given name, it was borne by American director Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999), as well as the character Stanley Kowalski in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947).
STAR f English
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.
STARLA f English
Elaborated form of STAR.
STARR f English
Variant of STAR.
STE m English
Short form of STEPHEN.
STELLA (1) f English, Italian, Dutch, German
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
STEPH f & m English
Short form of STEPHANIE or STEPHEN.
STEPHANIA f English
Latinate feminine form of STEPHEN.
STEPHANIE f English, German
Feminine form of STEPHEN.
STEPHEN m English, Biblical
From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown", more precisely "that which surrounds". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament. He is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.... [more]
STERLING m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".
STEVE m English
Short form of STEVEN. A notable bearer was American technology entrepreneur Steve Jobs (1955-2011).
STEVEN m English, Dutch
Medieval English variant of STEPHEN, and a Dutch variant of STEFAN. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of 'E.T.' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer of this name.
STEVIE m & f English
Diminutive of STEPHEN or STEPHANIE. A famous bearer is the American musician Stevie Wonder (1950-).
STEW m English
Short form of STEWART.
STEWART m English, Scottish
From a surname that was a variant STUART.
STIRLING m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant STERLING.
STONE m & f English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English stan.
STORM m & f English (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
STU m English
Short form of STUART.
STUART m English, Scottish
From an occupational surname originally belonging to a person who was a steward. It is ultimately derived from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard". As a given name, it arose in 19th-century Scotland in honour of the Stuart royal family, which produced several kings and queens of Scotland and Britain between the 14th and 18th centuries.
SUE f English
Short form of SUSANNA.
SUELLEN f English
Contraction of SUSAN and ELLEN (1). Margaret Mitchell used this name in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936), where it belongs to Scarlett's sister.
SUKIE f English
Diminutive of SUSANNA.
SULLIVAN m English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Súileabháin meaning "descendant of Súileabhán". The name Súileabhán means "little dark eye" in Irish.
SUMMER f English
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
SUNDAY f English
From the name of the day of the week, which ultimately derives from Old English sunnandæg, which was composed of the elements sunne "sun" and dæg "day".
SUNNY f & m English
From the English word meaning "sunny, cheerful".
SUNSHINE f English
From the English word, ultimately from Old English sunne "sun" and scinan "shine".
SUSAN f English
English variant of SUSANNA. This has been most common spelling since the 18th century. A notable bearer was the American feminist Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906).
SUSANNA f Italian, Catalan, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
From Σουσαννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.... [more]
SUSIE f English
Diminutive of SUSAN.
SUZ f English
Short form of SUSAN.
SUZAN (1) f English
Variant of SUSAN.
SUZANNA f English
Variant of SUSANNA.
SUZANNE f French, English, Dutch
French form of SUSANNA.
SUZI f English
Diminutive of SUSAN.
SUZIE f English
Diminutive of SUSAN.
SUZY f English
Diminutive of SUSAN.
SYBIL f English
Variant of SIBYL. This spelling variation has existed since the Middle Ages.
SYD m English
Short form of SYDNEY.
SYDNEY f & m English
From a surname that was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788. Since the 1990s this name has been mainly feminine.
SYLVESTER m English, Dutch, Danish, German
Medieval variant of SILVESTER. This is currently the usual English spelling of the name. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a famous bearer.
SYLVIA f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
SYMPHONY f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word, ultimately deriving from Greek συμφωνος (symphonos) "concordant in sound".
TABATHA f English
Variant of TABITHA.