English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
gender
usage
Kae f English (Rare)
Variant of Kay 1.
Kaety f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Kate.
Kai 1 m Frisian, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, English
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of Gerhard, Nicolaas, Cornelis or Gaius. It is borne by a boy captured by the Snow Queen in an 1844 fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. Spreading from Germany and Scandinavia, this name became popular in the English-speaking world and other places in Western Europe around the end of the 20th century.
Kaleb m English (Modern)
English variant of Caleb.
Kal-El m Popular Culture, English (Modern)
Created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in 1938 as the birth name of the comic book hero Superman, who came from the distant planet Krypton. The original spelling Kal-L was changed to Kal-El in the 1940s. Some have theorized that El is inspired by the common Hebrew name element אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Although Siegel and Shuster were Jewish, there is no evidence that they had this connection in mind, and it seems possible they simply made it up. Superman's other name, Clark Kent, was given to him by his adoptive parents.... [more]
Kam m & f English (Modern)
Short form of Kameron.
Kamryn f & m English (Modern)
Variant (typically feminine) of Cameron.
Kandi f English
Variant of Candy.
Kane m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Catháin, derived from the given name Cathán.
Kaolin m English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Caolán. This is also the name of a type of clay.
Kara 1 f English
Variant of Cara.
Karen 1 f Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, English, German
Danish short form of Katherine. It became common in the English-speaking world after the 1930s.
Karena f English (Rare)
Elaboration of Karen 1, possibly influenced by Carina 1.
Karissa f English
Variant of Charissa.
Karl m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, English, Finnish, Estonian, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of Charles. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
Karlene f English
Variant of Carlene.
Karolyn f English
Variant of Caroline.
Karrie f English
Variant of Carrie.
Karsyn f & m English (Modern)
Variant of Carson.
Karyn f English
Variant of Karen 1.
Kasandra f English (Modern), Polish
English variant and Polish form of Cassandra.
Kasey m & f English
Variant of Casey.
Kashton m English (Modern)
Probably a combination of Kash and the popular name suffix ton, inspired by names such as Ashton.
Kassandra f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek, English (Modern)
Greek form of Cassandra, as well as a modern English variant.
Kat f English
Diminutive of Katherine.
Kate f English, Croatian
Diminutive of Katherine, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy Taming of the Shrew (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).
Katee f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Kate.
Katey f English
Diminutive of Kate.
Katharine f English, German
English variant of Katherine and German variant of Katharina. A famous bearer was American actress Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003).
Katherina f English (Rare), German
Latinate form of Katherine. Shakespeare used this name in his play Taming of the Shrew (1593).
Katherine f English
From the Greek name Αἰκατερίνη (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from an earlier Greek name Ἑκατερινη (Hekaterine), itself from ἑκάτερος (hekateros) meaning "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess Hecate; it could be related to Greek αἰκία (aikia) meaning "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". In the early Christian era it became associated with Greek καθαρός (katharos) meaning "pure", and the Latin spelling was changed from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this.... [more]
Kathi f English
Diminutive of Katherine.
Kathie f English
Diminutive of Katherine.
Kathleen f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Caitlín.
Kathlyn f English
Anglicized form of Caitlín.
Kathryn f English
Contracted form of Katherine.
Kathy f English
Diminutive of Katherine.
Katie f English
Diminutive of Kate.
Katrina f Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Caitrìona.
Katy f English
Diminutive of Kate.
Kay 1 f English
Short form of Katherine and other names beginning with K.
Kaya 2 f English (Modern)
Possibly from the Scandinavian name Kaia, or simply an invented name based on the sounds found in other names such as Maya.
Kaycee f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of Casey.
Kayden m & f English (Modern)
Variant of Caden.
Kaye f English
Variant of Kay 1.
Kayla f English
Combination of the popular phonetic elements kay and la. Use of the name greatly increased after 1982 when the character Kayla Brady began appearing on the American soap opera Days of Our Lives.
Kaylee f English (Modern)
Combination of the popular phonetic elements kay and lee. This name, in various spellings, steadily rose in popularity starting in the 1980s. This particular spelling peaked in America in 2009, ranked 26th, and has since declined.
Kayleen f English (Modern)
Combination of the popular phonetic elements kay and lene.
Kayleigh f English (Modern)
Variant of Kaylee. This is also a common Anglicized form of the Gaelic word ceilidh, a traditional social gathering and dance.
Kaylyn f English (Modern)
Combination of the popular phonetic elements kay and lyn.
Kean m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, a variant of Kane.
Keane m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, a variant of Kane.
Keaton m English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "shed town" in Old English.
Keefe m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh, derived from the given name or byname Caomh.
Keegan m English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which was derived from the given name Aodhagán, a double diminutive of Aodh.
Keely f English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe, itself derived from the given name Caoladhe, from Irish caol "slender".
Kehlani f English (Modern)
Variant of Kailani or Kalani. This spelling was popularized by the American singer Kehlani Parrish (1995-), who is known simply as Kehlani.
Keighley f English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from an English place name, ultimately meaning "clearing belonging to Cyhha". The Old English given name Cyhha is of unknown meaning. This name also serves as a variant of Kaylee.
Keira f English (Modern)
Variant of Ciara 1. This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).
Keith m English, Scottish
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from the name of a place in East Lothian, itself possibly derived from the Celtic root *kayto- meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, becoming fairly common throughout the English-speaking world in the 20th century.
Keitha f English (Rare)
Feminine form of Keith.
Kelcey m & f English (Rare)
Variant of Kelsey.
Kelda f English (Rare)
Possibly derived from Old Norse kildr meaning "a spring".
Kelia f English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps an invented name.
Kellan m English (Modern)
Variant of Kellen. This particular spelling jumped in popularity after actor Kellan Lutz (1985-) appeared in the Twilight series of movies beginning 2008.
Kellen m English (Modern)
Possibly from a German surname, itself derived from Middle Low German kel "swampy area". This name began to be used in the United States in the early 1980s after the American football player Kellen Winslow (1957-) began his professional career.
Kelley f & m English
Variant of Kelly.
Kelli f English
Variant of Kelly.
Kellie f English
Variant of Kelly.
Kelly m & f Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name Ceallach or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).... [more]
Kelsey f & m English
From an English surname that is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
Kelvin m English
From the name of a Scottish river, perhaps meaning "narrow water". As a title it was borne by the Irish-Scottish physicist William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), who acquired his title from the river.
Kemp m English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, athlete, warrior".
Ken 1 m English
Short form of Kenneth.
Kendal m & f English (Modern)
From a surname that was a variant of Kendall.
Kendall m & f English
From an English surname that comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent". Originally mostly masculine, the name received a boost in popularity for girls in 1993 when the devious character Kendall Hart began appearing on the American soap opera All My Children.
Kendra f English
Feminine form of Ken 1 or Kendrick.
Kendrick m English
From a surname that has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of Henry".... [more]
Kenelm m English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
Kennard m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given names Cyneweard or Cyneheard.
Kennedy f & m English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Cinnéidigh, itself derived from the given name Cennétig. The name has sometimes been given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963). It was popularized as a name for girls by Lisa Kennedy Montgomery (1972-), known simply as Kennedy, the host of the television program Alternative Nation on MTV from 1992 to 1997.
Kenneth m Scottish, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Anglicized form of both Coinneach and Cináed. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his 1825 novel The Talisman. A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote The Wind in the Willows.
Kennith m English
Variant of Kenneth.
Kenny m Scottish, English
Diminutive of Kenneth.
Kent m English
From a surname that was originally derived from Kent, the name of a county in England, which may be derived from a Brythonic word meaning "coastal district".
Kenton m English
From a surname that was derived from an English place name meaning either "town on the River Kenn" or "royal town" in Old English.
Kenya f English, African American
From the name of the African country. The country is named for Mount Kenya, which in the Kikuyu language is called Kĩrĩnyaga meaning "the one having stripes". It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 1960s.
Kenyon m English
From a surname that was derived from an English place name, of uncertain meaning.
Kenzie m & f English
Short form of Mackenzie.
Keri f English
Feminine variant of Kerry.
Kermit m English
From a rare (Americanized) Manx surname, a variant of the Irish surname Mac Diarmada, itself derived from the given name Diarmaid. This was the name of a son of Theodore Roosevelt born in 1889. He was named after a relative of his mother, Robert Kermit. The name is now associated with Kermit the Frog, a Muppet created by puppeteer Jim Henson in 1955.
Kerri f English
Feminine variant of Kerry.
Kerrie f English
Feminine variant of Kerry.
Kerry m & f English
From the name of the Irish county, called Ciarraí in Irish Gaelic, which means "Ciar's people".
Kestrel f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
Kev m English
Short form of Kevin.
Kevan m English
Variant of Kevin.
Kevin m English, Irish, French (Modern), Spanish (Modern), German (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern), Danish (Modern)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín meaning "beloved birth", derived from Old Irish Cóemgein, composed of cóem "dear, beloved, gentle" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the middle of the 20th century, and elsewhere in Europe in the late 20th century.
Kevyn m & f English (Rare)
Variant or feminine form of Kevin.
Khloe f English (Modern)
Variant of Chloe. This particular variant was popularized by the television personality Khloé Kardashian (1984-) after she began appearing with her family on the reality show Keeping Up with the Kardashians in 2007.
Kiana 1 f Hawaiian, English
Hawaiian form of Diana. It was brought to wider attention in the late 1980s, likely by the Hawaiian fitness instructor Kiana Tom (1965-), who had a television show on ESPN beginning in 1988.
Kiara f English (Modern)
Variant of Ciara 1 or Chiara. This name was brought to public attention in 1988 after the singing duo Kiara released their song This Time. It was further popularized by a character in the animated movie The Lion King II (1998).
Kiaran m English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Kiefer m English (Modern)
From a German surname meaning either "pine tree" or "barrel maker".
Kiera f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Ciara 1.
Kieran m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Kieron m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Kierra f English (Modern)
Variant of Kiara influenced by the spelling of Sierra.
Kiki f English, German, Greek
Diminutive of names beginning with or containing the sound K.
Kiley f English
Variant of Kylie.
Kim 1 f & m English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of Kimberly, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel Kim (1901), though in this case it was short for Kimball. In her novel Show Boat (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.
Kimball m English
From a surname that was derived from either the Welsh given name Cynbel or the Old English given name Cynebald.
Kimberly f English
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord Kimberley (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.
Kimberlyn f English (Rare)
Elaboration of Kimberly using the popular name suffix lyn.
Kimmie f English
Diminutive of Kimberly or Kim 1.
Kimmy f English
Diminutive of Kimberly or Kim 1.
King m English
From the English vocabulary word king, ultimately derived from Old English cyning. This was also a surname, derived from the same source, a famous bearer being the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968).
Kingsley m English (Modern)
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's wood" in Old English. This name may have received a boost in popularity after the release of the 2007 movie Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, featuring the character Kingsley Shacklebolt.
Kingston m English (Modern)
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's town" in Old English. This name rose significantly on the popularity charts after musicians Gwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale used it for their son born 2006.
Kinley f English (Modern)
From a Scottish surname, an Anglicized form of Mac Fhionnlaigh, itself derived from the given name Fionnlagh.
Kinsey f English (Modern)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Cynesige. This name is borne by Kinsey Millhone, the heroine in a series of mystery novels by author Sue Grafton, beginning in 1982.
Kinsley f English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from an English place name, itself meaning "clearing belonging to Cyne". The Old English given name Cyne is a short form of longer names beginning with cyne meaning "royal".... [more]
Kip m English
From a nickname, probably from the English word kipper meaning "male salmon".
Kipling m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "Cyppel's people". The surname was borne by Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), a British novelist born in India who wrote The Jungle Book and other works.
Kira 2 f English
Variant of Ciara 1.
Kirby m & f English
From an English surname that was originally from a place name meaning "church settlement" in Old Norse. This name briefly spiked in popularity for American girls in 1982 after the character Kirby Anders Colby was introduced to the soap opera Dynasty.
Kirk m English
From an English and Scottish surname meaning "church" from Old Norse kirkja, ultimately from Greek κυριακόν (kyriakon). A famous bearer was American actor Kirk Douglas (1916-2020), whose birth name was Issur Danielovitch.
Kirsten f Danish, Norwegian, English
Danish and Norwegian form of Christina.
Kit m & f English
Diminutive of Christopher or Katherine. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
Kitty f English
Diminutive of Katherine.
Kizzie f English
Diminutive of Keziah.
Kizzy f English
Diminutive of Keziah. This particular spelling was repopularized in the late 1970s by a character in the book and miniseries Roots (1977).
Knox m English
From a Scots surname that was derived from various places named Knock, from Gaelic cnoc "round hill". It jumped in popularity after the actors Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt had a baby by this name in 2008.
Knute m English (American, Rare)
Variant of Knut. This spelling is most widespread in America.
Korey m English
Variant of Corey.
Kori f English
Feminine form of Corey.
Kory m English
Variant of Corey.
Kourtney f English (Modern)
Variant of Courtney. Like Courtney this name declined in popularity in the 1990s, but it was briefly revived after 2007 by the television personality Kourtney Kardashian (1979-) when she began appearing on the reality show Keeping Up with the Kardashians.
Kris m & f English, Flemish, Danish
Short form of Kristian, Kristoffer and other names beginning with Kris.
Kristal f English
Variant of Crystal.
Kristi f English, Estonian
Diminutive of Christina or Christine (English) or Kristiina (Estonian).
Kristie f English
Diminutive of Christina or Christine.
Kristina f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Russian, German, Slovene, Czech, Lithuanian, Serbian, Croatian, Faroese, English, Bulgarian
Form of Christina in several languages. It is also an English variant of Christina and a Bulgarian variant of Hristina.
Kristine f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Georgian, English, German
Scandinavian and Georgian form of Christina, as well as an English and German variant of Christine.
Kristy f English
Diminutive of Christina or Christine.
Krystal f English
Variant of Crystal.
Krystle f English (Modern)
Variant of Crystal. This particular spelling was popularized by the character Krystle Carrington from the American soap opera Dynasty (1981-1989).
Kurt m German, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
German contracted form of Conrad. A famous bearer was the American musician Kurt Cobain (1967-1994).
Kurtis m English
Variant of Curtis.
Kyla f English
Feminine form of Kyle, or a combination of the popular phonetic elements ky and la.
Kylan m English (Modern)
Invented name based on the sounds found in other names such as Kyle and Rylan.
Kyle m English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from various place names, themselves from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait". As a given name it was rare in the first half of the 20th century. It rose steadily in popularity throughout the English-speaking world, entering the top 50 in most places by the 1990s. It has since declined in all regions.
Kylee f English
Variant of Kylie.
Kyler m English (Modern)
Probably a blend of the sounds of Kyle and Tyler. It also coincides with the surname Kyler, an Anglicized form of Dutch Cuyler.
Kylie f English
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in the Australian Aboriginal language Nyungar. An early bearer was the author Kylie Tennant (1912-1988). It was among the most popular names in Australia in the 1970s and early 80s. It can also be considered a feminine form of Kyle, or a combination of the popular sounds ky and lee, and it is likely in those capacities that it began to be used in America in the late 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian pop singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).
Kym f English (Rare)
Variant of Kim 1.
Kynaston m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Cynefrið's town" in Old English.
Kyra f English
Variant of Kira 2, sometimes considered a feminine form of Cyrus.
Kyrie 2 f English (Modern)
From the name of a Christian prayer, also called the Kyrie eleison meaning "Lord, have mercy". It is ultimately from Greek κύριος (kyrios) meaning "lord".
Kyson m English (Modern)
An invented name, using the same sound found in names such as Bryson and Tyson.
Lacey f & m English
Variant of Lacy. This is currently the most popular spelling of this name.
Lachlan m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Lachlann, the Scottish Gaelic form of Lochlainn. In the English-speaking world, this name was especially popular in Australia towards the end of the 20th century.
Laci 2 f English (Modern)
Variant of Lacy. This name jumped in popularity in 2003 after the media coverage of the murder of Laci Peterson (1975-2002).
Lacy f & m English
From a surname that was derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name that was Latinized as Lascius. Formerly more common for boys in America, this name began to grow in popularity for girls in 1975.
Laird m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname meaning "landowner" in Scots.
Lake m & f English (Rare)
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.
Lalia f English (Rare)
Short form of Eulalia.
Lallie f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Lalage.
Lally f English (Rare)
Diminutive of Lalage.
Lamar m English, African American
From a French and English surname, originally from a place name in Normandy, which was derived from Old French la mare meaning "the pool". In the second half of the 20th century this name has been well-used in the African-American community, probably because of its popular phonetic components la and mar.
Lambert m German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements landa "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
Lamont m English, African American
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the medieval Gaelic given name Lagmann, itself from Old Norse lǫgmaðr meaning "law man". This name reached a peak in its American popularity in 1972, the same year that the sitcom Sanford and Son debuted, featuring the character Lamont Sanford (the titular son).
Lana f English, Russian, Croatian, Slovene, Georgian
Short form of Alana (English) or Svetlana (Russian). In the English-speaking world it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995), who was born Julia Jean Turner.
Lance m English
From the Germanic name Lanzo, originally a short form of names that began with the element landa meaning "land". During the Middle Ages it became associated with Old French lance "spear, lance". A famous bearer is American cyclist Lance Armstrong (1971-).
Landon m English
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).
Lane m English
From an English surname, meaning "lane, path", which originally belonged to a person who lived near a lane.
Laney f English
Diminutive of Elaine.
Lanford m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "long ford" in Old English.
Langdon m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of the surname Landon.
Lanny m English
Diminutive of Lance, Landon and other names beginning with Lan.
Lara 1 f Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of Larisa. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel Doctor Zhivago (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965). Between 1965 and 1969 it increased by almost 2,000 percent in the United States, however it is currently much more popular in the United Kingdom, Australia, Spain, Portugual, Italy, and Germany. Another famous fictional bearer is Lara Croft, first appearing in video games in 1996 and movies in 2001.
Laraine f English
Variant of Lorraine.
Larissa f English, German, Portuguese (Brazilian), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant of Larisa. It has been commonly used as an English given name only since the 20th century, as a borrowing from Russian. In 1991 this name was given to one of the moons of Neptune, in honour of the mythological character.
Lark f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of songbird.
Larrie m English
Diminutive of Laurence 1.
Larry m English
Diminutive of Laurence 1. A notable bearer is former basketball player Larry Bird (1956-).