English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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MEADE m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that indicated one who lived on a meadow (from Middle English mede) or one who sold or made mead (an alcoholic drink made from fermented honey; from Old English meodu).
MEADOW f English (Modern)
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.
MEAGAN f English
Variant of MEGAN.
MEAGHAN f English
Variant of MEGAN.
MEG f English
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET. It is now also used as a short form of the related name MEGAN.
MEGAN f Welsh, English
Welsh diminutive of MARGARET. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.
MEGHAN f English
Variant of MEGAN.
MEL m & f English
Short form of MELVIN, MELANIE, MELISSA, and other names beginning with Mel.
MELANIE f English, German, Dutch
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.... [more]
MELANTHA f English (Rare)
Probably a combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the suffix antha (from Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower"). John Dryden used this name in his play 'Marriage a la Mode' (1672).
MELBA f English
From the surname of the Australian opera singer Nellie Melba (1861-1931). This was a stage name that she got from the name of the city Melbourne, where she was born.
MELESINA f English (Rare)
Perhaps a form of MILLICENT. It was borne by the Irish writer and socialite Melesina Trench (1768-1827).
MELINA f English, Greek
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μελι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.
MELINDA f English, Hungarian
Combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the popular name suffix inda. It was created in the 18th century, and may have been inspired by the similar name Belinda. In Hungary, the name was popularized by the 1819 play 'Bánk Bán' by József Katona.
MELISSA f English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "bee" in Greek. This was the name of a nymph that cared for young Zeus in Greek mythology. It is also the name of the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina in Ludovico Ariosto's poem 'Orlando Furioso' (1516). As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
MELODY f English
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) "to sing".
MELVA f English
Perhaps a feminine form of MELVIN.
MELVILLE m English
From a Scottish surname that was originally from a Norman French place name meaning "bad town". A famous bearer of the surname was the American author Herman Melville (1819-1891), who wrote several novels including 'Moby-Dick'.
MELVIN m English
From a Scottish surname that probably originated as a variant of MELVILLE.
MELVYN m English
Variant of MELVIN.
MERCIA f English (Rare)
Latinate form of MERCY. This was also the name of an old Anglo-Saxon kingdom, though it has a different origin.
MERCY f English
From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
MEREDITH m & f Welsh, English
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MERILYN f English
Variant of MARILYN.
MERIT (1) m English (Rare)
Either a variant of MERRITT or else simply from the English word merit, ultimately from Latin meritus "deserving".
MERIWETHER m English (Rare)
From a surname meaning "happy weather" in Middle English, originally belonging to a cheery person. A notable bearer of the name was Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809), who, with William Clark, explored the west of North America.
MERLE f & m English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MERLETTA f English (Rare)
Diminutive of MERLE.
MERLIN m Arthurian Romance, English
Form of the Welsh name Myrddin (meaning "sea fortress") used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 12th-century Arthurian tales. Writing in Latin, he likely chose the form Merlinus over Merdinus in order to prevent associations with French merde "excrement".... [more]
MERLYN m & f English
Variant of MERLIN, sometimes used as a feminine form. It has perhaps been influenced by the Welsh word merlyn meaning "pony".
MERRICK m English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from the Welsh given name MEURIG.
MERRILL m English
From an English surname that was derived either from the given name MURIEL or from place names meaning "pleasant hill".
MERRITT m English
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "boundary gate" in Old English.
MERRY (1) f English
From the English word merry, ultimately from Old English myrige. This name appears in Charles Dickens' novel 'Martin Chuzzlewit' (1844), where it is a diminutive of MERCY.
MERTON m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "town on a lake" in Old English.
MERV m English
Short form of MERVYN.
MERVIN m Welsh, English
Variant of MERVYN.
MERVYN m Welsh, English
From the Welsh name Merfyn, which possibly meant "marrow famous". This was the name of a 9th-century Welsh king, Merfyn Frych.
MERYL f English
Variant of MURIEL, influenced by the spelling of the name CHERYL. A famous bearer is American actress Meryl Streep (1949-), whose real name is Mary Louise Streep.
MESSIAH m Theology, English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "saviour", ultimately from Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ (mashiyach) meaning "anointed". The word appears in the Old Testament referring to a future king of the Jewish people. In the New Testament it is translated as Christ and is used as a title of Jesus.
MIA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MICA f English
Short form of MICHAELA.
MICAH m Biblical, English
Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
MICHAEL m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHEAL m English
Variant of MICHAEL.
MICHELLE f French, English, Dutch
French feminine form of MICHEL. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century.
MICK m English, Dutch
Short form of MICHAEL. This name has become a slang term for an Irishman.
MICKEY m & f English
Diminutive or feminine form of MICHAEL. This was the name that Walt Disney gave to Ub Iwerks' cartoon character Mickey Mouse, who was originally named Mortimer Mouse. Another famous bearer was the American baseball player Mickey Mantle (1931-1995).
MICKY m English
Diminutive of MICHAEL.
MIKE m English
Short form of MICHAEL.
MIKEY m English
Diminutive of MICHAEL.
MIKHAILA f English (Rare)
Variant of MICHAELA, possibly influenced by the spelling of Mikhail.
MIKKI f English
Strictly feminine variant of MICKEY.
MILBURN m English
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "mill stream" in Old English.
MILDRED f English
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman Conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MILES m English
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".
MILEY f English (Modern)
In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled. Although it was not at all common before she brought it to public attention, there are some examples of its use before her time, most likely as a diminutive of MILES.
MILFORD m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from various place names all meaning "ford by a mill" in Old English.
MILLARD m English
From an occupational English surname meaning "guardian of the mill" in Old English.
MILLICENT f English
From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.
MILLIE f English
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MILLY f Swedish, Norwegian, English
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MILO m English, Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.
MILTON m English
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote 'Paradise Lost'.
MIMI f English, Italian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with M.
MINA (1) f English, Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel 'Dracula' (1897) by Bram Stoker.
MINDY f English
Diminutive of MELINDA.
MINERVA f Roman Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MINNIE f English
Diminutive of WILHELMINA.
MINTA f English
Short form of ARAMINTA.
MINTY f English (Rare)
Diminutive of ARAMINTA.
MIRABELLE f French (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MIRACLE f English (Modern)
From the English word miracle for an extraordinary event, ultimately deriving from Latin miraculum "wonder, marvel".
MIRANDA f English, Dutch
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
MIRIAM f Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
MISSIE f English
Diminutive of MELISSA.
MISSY f English
Diminutive of MELISSA. This is also a slang term meaning "young woman".
MISTI f English
Variant of MISTY.
MISTY f English
From the English word misty, ultimately derived from Old English. The jazz song 'Misty' (1954) by Erroll Garner may have helped popularize the name.
MITCH m English
Short form of MITCHELL.
MITCHELL m English
From a surname, itself derived from the given name MICHAEL or in some cases from Middle English michel meaning "big, large".
MO f & m English
Short form of MAUREEN, MAURICE, MORRIS, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
MODESTY f English (Rare)
From the English word modesty, ultimately from Latin modestus "moderate", a derivative of modus "measure".
MOE (1) m English
Short form of MAURICE or MORRIS, or sometimes of other names beginning with a similar sound.
MOIRA f Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
MOLLIE f English
Variant of MOLLY.
MOLLY f English
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
MONA (1) f Irish, English
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").
MONDAY f English (Rare)
From the English word for the day of the week, which was derived from Old English mona "moon" and dæg "day". This was formerly given to girls born on Monday.
MONICA f English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
MONIQUE f French, English, Dutch
French form of MONICA.
MONNA f English
Variant of MONA (1).
MONROE m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "from the mouth of the Roe". The Roe is a river in Ireland. Two famous bearers of the surname were American president James Monroe (1758-1831) and American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
MONTAGUE m English (Rare)
From a surname meaning "pointed mountain" in French. In Shakespeare's tragedy 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596) this is the surname of Romeo and his family.
MONTANA f & m English (Modern)
From the name of the American state, which is derived from Latin montanus "mountainous".
MONTE m English
Either a diminutive of MONTGOMERY or from the Spanish or Italian vocabulary word meaning "mountain".
MONTGOMERY m English
From an English surname meaning "GUMARICH's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
MONTY m English
Variant of MONTE.
MOREEN f Irish, English
Anglicized form of MÓIRÍN. It is sometimes used as a variant of MAUREEN.
MORGAN (1) m & f Welsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MORGANA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of MORGAN (1).
MORIAH f English (Modern)
From Hebrew מֹרִיָה (Moriyah) possibly meaning "seen by YAHWEH". This is a place name in the Old Testament, both the land where Abraham is to sacrifice Isaac and the mountain upon which Solomon builds the temple. They may be the same place. Since the 1980s it has occasionally been used as a feminine given name in America.
MORLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally from an Old English place name meaning "marsh clearing".
MORRIS m English, Medieval English
Usual medieval form of MAURICE.
MORT m English
Short form of MORTON or MORTIMER.
MORTIMER m English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "still water" in Old French.
MORTON m English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "moor town" in Old English.
MORTY m English
Diminutive of MORTON or MORTIMER.
MOSES m English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh), which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology (see Exodus 2:10). The biblical Moses was drawn out of the Nile by the pharaoh's daughter and adopted into the royal family, at a time when the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. With his brother Aaron he demanded the pharaoh release the Israelites, which was only done after God sent ten plagues upon Egypt. Moses led the people across the Red Sea and to Mount Sinai, where he received the Ten Commandments from God. After 40 years of wandering in the desert the people reached Canaan, the Promised Land, but Moses died just before entering it.... [more]
MOSS m English (Archaic), Jewish
Medieval form of MOSES.
MURIEL f English, French, Irish
Medieval English form of a Celtic name that was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel 'John Halifax, Gentleman' (1856).
MURPHY m & f Irish, English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of MURCHADH".
MURRAY m Scottish, English
From a surname, which is either Scottish or Irish in origin (see MURRAY (1) and MURRAY (2)).
MYLA f English (Modern)
Possibly a feminine form of MILES, influenced by similar-sounding names such as Kyla.
MYLES (1) m English
Variant of MILES.
MYRA f English
Created by the 17th-century poet Fulke Greville. He possibly based it on Latin myrra meaning "myrrh" (a fragrant resin obtained from a tree). Otherwise, he may have simply rearranged the letters from the name MARY. Although unrelated etymologically, this is also the name of an ancient city of Anatolia.
MYRON m English, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek μυρον (myron) meaning "sweet oil, perfume". Myron was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek sculptor. Saints bearing this name include a 3rd-century bishop of Crete and a 4th-century martyr from Cyzicus who was killed by a mob. These saints are more widely revered in the Eastern Church, and the name has generally been more common among Eastern Christians. As an English name, it has been used since the 19th century.
MYRTIE f English
Diminutive of MYRTLE.
MYRTLE f English
Simply from the English word myrtle for the evergreen shrub, ultimately from Greek μυρτος (myrtos). It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
NADIA (1) f French, Italian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).
NADINE f French, German, English
French elaborated form of NADIA (1).
NAN f English
Originally a diminutive of ANN. It may have originated with the affectionate phrase mine Ann, which was later reinterpreted as my Nan. It is now also used as a short form of NANCY.
NANCE f English
Short form of NANCY.
NANCY f English
Previously a medieval diminutive of ANNIS, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of ANN. It is now usually regarded as an independent name. During the 20th century it became very popular in the United States. A city in the Lorraine region of France bears this name, though it derives from a different source.
NANETTE f English
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
NANNIE f English
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
NANNY f English
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
NAOMI (1) f English, Hebrew, Biblical
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omi) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara (see Ruth 1:20).... [more]
NAPIER m English (Rare)
From an English and Scots surname meaning "linen keeper" in Middle English, from Old French nappe "table cloth".
NAPOLEON m History, English
From the old Italian name Napoleone, used most notably by the French emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was born on Corsica. The etymology is uncertain, but it is possibly derived from the Germanic Nibelungen meaning "sons of mist", a name used in Germanic mythology to refer to the keepers of a hoard of treasure (often identified with the Burgundians). Alternatively, it could be connected to the name of the Italian city of Napoli (Naples).
NARELLE f English (Australian)
Meaning unknown. It was borne by the wife of Umbarra, who was a 19th-century leader of the Yuin, an Aboriginal people.
NASH m English (Modern)
From a surname that was derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer of the surname was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015). The name was popularized in the 1990s by the television series 'Nash Bridges'.
NAT m & f English
Short form of NATHAN, NATHANIEL, NATALIE, or other names beginning with Nat.
NATALIE f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
NATASHA f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
NATE m English
Short form of NATHAN or NATHANIEL.
NATHAN m English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.... [more]
NATHANIEL m English, Biblical
Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.
NEAL m English
Variant of NEIL.
NED m English
Diminutive of EDWARD or EDMUND. It has been used since the 14th century, and may have had root in the medieval affectionate phrase mine Ed, which was later reinterpreted as my Ned.
NEELY m English
From a Scottish surname, an Anglicized form of Mac an Fhilidh meaning "son of the poet" in Gaelic.
NEIL m Irish, Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.... [more]
NELDA f English
Possibly an elaboration of NELL using the popular name suffix da.
NELL f English
Medieval diminutive of names beginning with El, such as ELEANOR, ELLEN (1) or HELEN. It may have arisen from the medieval affectionate phrase mine El, which was later reinterpreted as my Nel.
NELLE f English
Variant of NELL.
NELLIE f English
Diminutive of NELL.
NELLY f English
Diminutive of NELL.
NELSON m English
From an English surname meaning "son of NEIL". It was originally given in honour of the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). His most famous battle was the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he destroyed a combined French and Spanish fleet, but was himself killed. Another notable bearer was the South African statesman Nelson Mandela (1918-2013). Mandela's birth name was Rolihlahla; as a child he was given the English name Nelson by a teacher.
NENA f English
Variant of NINA (1).
NESS (2) f English
Short form of VANESSA.
NESSA (1) f English
Short form of VANESSA and other names ending in nessa.
NETTA (1) f English
Short form of names ending in netta.
NETTIE f English
Diminutive of names ending in nette, such as ANNETTE or JEANETTE.
NEVA f English
Short form of GENEVA.
NEVADA f English
From the name of the American state, which means "snow-capped" in Spanish.
NEVAEH f English (Modern)
The word heaven spelled backwards. It became popular after the musician Sonny Sandoval from the rock group P.O.D. gave it to his daughter in 2000.
NEVILLE m English (British)
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "new town" in Norman French. As a given name it is chiefly British and Australian.
NEWT m English
Short form of NEWTON.
NEWTON m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "new town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English physicist Isaac Newton (1643-1727).
NIA (3) f English, Georgian
Short form of ANTONIA, SIDONIA and other names ending in nia.
NIC m English
Short form of NICHOLAS, or sometimes DOMINIC.
NICHOLAS m English
From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.... [more]
NICHOLE f English
Variant of NICOLE.
NICK m English, Dutch
Short form of NICHOLAS.
NICKY m & f English
Diminutive of NICHOLAS or NICOLE.
NICOLA (2) f German, Czech, English
Latinate feminine form of NICHOLAS. In the English-speaking world this name is more common outside of America, where Nicole is more usual.
NICOLE f French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of NICHOLAS, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).
NIGEL m English
From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of NEIL. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Fortunes of Nigel' (1822).
NIGELLA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of NIGEL.
NIKI (2) f English
Diminutive of NICOLE.
NIKKI f English
Diminutive of NICOLE.
NIKOLAS m Greek, English
Variant of NIKOLAOS (Greek) or NICHOLAS (English).
NIKOLE f Basque, English
Basque form of NICOLE, as well as an English variant.
NILES m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name NEIL.
NINA (1) f Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also nearly coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NITA (1) f English
Short form of ANITA (1) and other names ending in nita.
NIXON m English (Modern)
From an English surname meaning "son of NICK". It was borne by the American president Richard Nixon (1913-1994).
NOAH (1) m English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name נֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, repose", derived from the root נוּחַ (nuach). According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the Great Flood. After the flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. He was the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.... [more]
NOBLE m English
From an English surname meaning "noble, notable". The name can also be given in direct reference to the English word noble.
NOEL m English
English form of NOËL.
NOELENE f English (Rare)
Feminine diminutive of NOEL.
NOELLE f English
English form of NOËLLE.
NOLA f English, Irish
Diminutive of MAGNOLIA, FINOLA and other names containing a similar sound.
NOLAN m Irish, English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
NOLENE f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of NOLA.
NONA (2) f English, Ancient Roman (Rare)
Feminine form of NONUS. It was also used in 19th-century England, derived directly from Latin nonus "ninth" and traditionally given to the ninth-born child.
NONIE f English
Diminutive of IONE or NORA (1).
NORA (1) f Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, German, Dutch, Italian
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).
NORBERT m German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord meaning "north" and beraht meaning "bright". This was the name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
NOREEN f Irish, English
Diminutive of NORA (1).
NORENE f Irish, English
Diminutive of NORA (1).
NORM m English
Short form of NORMAN.
NORMA f English, Italian, Literature
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera 'Norma' (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
NORMAN m English, Ancient Germanic
From an old Germanic byname meaning "northman", referring to a Viking. The Normans were Vikings who settled on the coast of France, in the region that became known as Normandy. In England the name Norman or Normant was used before the Norman Conquest, first as a nickname for Scandinavian settlers and later as a given name. After the Conquest it became more common, but died out around the 14th century. It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to a character by this name in C. M. Yonge's novel 'The Daisy Chain' (1856).
NORMAND m English
From a surname that was derived from the same source as the name NORMAN.
NORMINA f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of NORMA.
NORRIS m English
From an English surname, either NORRIS (1) or NORRIS (2).
NORTON m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "north town" in Old English.
NORWOOD m English
From a surname that was originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
NOVA f English
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
NOWELL m English (Rare)
From the surname Nowell (a variant of NOEL).
NYDIA f English (Rare), Spanish, Literature
Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel 'The Last Days of Pompeii' (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".
NYLA f English
Possibly a feminine form of NILES, influenced by similar-sounding names such as Kyla.
NYREE f English (New Zealand)
Anglicized form of NGAIRE. It was borne by New Zealand actress Nyree Dawn Porter (1936-2001).
OAKLEY m & f English
From an English surname that was from various place names meaning "oak clearing" in Old English.
OCEAN m & f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.
OCTAVIA f English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
ODELL m & f English
From a surname that was originally from an English place name, itself derived from Old English wad "woad" (a plant that produces a blue dye) and hyll "hill".
ODETTA f English (Rare)
Latinate form of ODETTE.
ODIN m Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe. However, Odin is best known from Norse mythology, as the highest of the gods, presiding over art, war, wisdom and death. He resided in Valhalla, where warriors went after they were slain.
OGDEN m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "oak valley" in Old English. A famous bearer was the humourous American poet Ogden Nash (1902-1971).
OLI m English
Short form of OLIVER.
OLIVE f English, French
From the English and French word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.
OLIVER m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVIA f English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
OLLIE m & f English
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
OLLY m English
Diminutive of OLIVER.
OMAR (1) m Arabic, English, Spanish, Italian
Alternate transcription of Arabic عمر (see UMAR). This is the usual English spelling of the 12th-century poet Umar Khayyam's name. In his honour it has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world, notably for the American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
ONEIDA f English
From the name of a Native American tribe, perhaps meaning "standing rock".
OPAL f English
From the English word opal for the iridescent gemstone, the birthstone of October. The word ultimately derives from Sanskrit उपल (upala) meaning "jewel".
OPALINE f English (Rare)
Elaborated form of OPAL.
OPHELIA f English, Literature
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
ORA (1) f & m English
Perhaps based on Latin oro "to pray". It was first used in America in the 19th century.
ORAL m English
Meaning uncertain. This name was borne by the influential American evangelist Oral Roberts (1918-2009), who was apparently named by his cousin.
ORALEE f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of AURÉLIE.
ORALIE f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of AURÉLIE.
ORINDA f English (Rare)
Probably an elaboration of Spanish oro "gold". This was the pseudonym of the English poet Katherine Philips (1631-1664).
ORMOND m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Ruaidh meaning "descendant of RUADH".
ORPHA f Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, English
Form of ORPAH used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
ORRELL m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "ore hill" in Old English.
ORSON m English
From a Norman nickname derived from a diminutive of Norman French ors "bear", ultimately from Latin ursus. American actor and director Orson Welles (1915-1985) was a famous bearer of this name.
ORVAL m English
Variant of ORVILLE.
ORVILLE m English
This name was invented by the 18th-century writer Fanny Burney, who perhaps intended it to mean "golden city" in French. Orville Wright (1871-1948), together with his brother Wilbur, invented the first successful airplane.
OSBERT m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright". After the Norman Conquest, this Old English name was merged with its Norman cognate. It was rare in the Middle Ages, and eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OSBORN m English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjǫrn used in England, and after the Norman Conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSBORNE m English
From a surname that was a variant of OSBORN.
OSBOURNE m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of OSBORN.
OSCAR m English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OSMOND m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans. Saint Osmund was an 11th-century Norman nobleman who became an English bishop. Though it eventually became rare, it was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSWALD m English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OSWIN m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman Conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OTIS m English
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Ode, a cognate of OTTO. In America it has been used in honour of the revolutionary James Otis (1725-1783).
OTTO m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
OTTOLINE f English (Rare)
Diminutive of OTTILIE. A famous bearer was the British socialite Lady Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938).
OWEN (1) m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of OWAIN.
OZ (1) m English
Short form of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZIE m English
Diminutive of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZY m English
Variant of OZZIE.
PACE m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the Middle English word pace meaning "peace".
PACEY m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the French place name Pacy, itself derived from Gaulish given name of unknown meaning.
PADEN m English (Rare)
An invented name, using the popular den suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. It is sometimes considered a derivative of the surname PADDON.
PAGE m English
From a surname that was a variant of PAIGE.
PAGET f English (Rare)
From a surname that meant "little page" (see PAIGE).
PAIGE f English
From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PAISLEY f English (Modern)
From a Scottish surname, originally from the name of a town, which may ultimately be derived from Latin basilica "church". This is also a word (derived from the name of that same town) for a type of pattern commonly found on fabrics.
PALMER m English
From an English surname meaning "pilgrim". It is ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PAM f English
Short form of PAMELA.
PAMELA f English
This name was invented in the late 16th century by the poet Sir Philip Sidney for use in his poem 'Arcadia'. He possibly intended it to mean "all sweetness" from Greek παν (pan) "all" and μελι (meli) "honey". It was later employed by author Samuel Richardson for the heroine in his novel 'Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded' (1740), after which time it became used as a given name. It did not become popular until the 20th century.
PAMELIA f English
Elaborated form of PAMELA.
PAMELLA f English
Variant of PAMELA.
PANCRAS m English (Archaic)
Medieval English form of PANCRATIUS. The relics of the 4th-century saint Pancratius were sent to England by Pope Gregory the Great, leading to the saint's veneration there.
PANSY f English
From the English word for a type of flower, ultimately deriving from Old French pensee "thought".
PARKER m & f English
From an English occupational surname that meant "keeper of the park".
PARNEL f English (Archaic)
Contracted form of PETRONEL. In the later Middle Ages it became a slang term for a promiscuous woman, and the name subsequently fell out of use.
PARRIS m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris (see PARIS (2)).
PAT m & f English
Short form of PATRICK or PATRICIA. A famous bearer of this name was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
PATIENCE f English
From the English word patience, ultimately from Latin patientia, a derivative of pati "to suffer". This was one of the virtue names coined by the Puritans in the 17th century.