English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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TABBY f English
Diminutive of TABITHA.
TABITHA f English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show 'Bewitched', in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.
TACEY f English (Archaic)
Derived from Latin tace meaning "be silent". It was in use from the 16th century, though it died out two centuries later.
TAD m English
Short form of THADDEUS.
TAEGAN f & m English (Rare)
Variant of TEAGAN.
TALBOT m English (Rare)
From a surname that was perhaps derived from a Germanic given name composed of the elements tal "to destroy" and bod "message".
TALIA (2) f English (Australian)
From the name of a town in South Australia, perhaps meaning "near water" in an Australian Aboriginal language.
TALLULAH f English (Rare)
Popularly claimed to mean "leaping waters" in the Choctaw language, it may actually mean "town" in the Creek language. This is the name of waterfalls in Georgia. It was borne by American actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968), who was named after her grandmother, who may have been named after the waterfalls.
TALON m English (Modern)
From the English meaning "talon, claw", ultimately derived (via Norman French) from Latin talus "anklebone".
TAMARA f Russian, Ukrainian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian
Russian form of TAMAR. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).
TAMEKA f English
Variant of TAMIKA.
TAMELA f English
Probably a blend of TAMARA and PAMELA. It first arose in the 1950s.
TAMERA f English
Variant of TAMARA.
TAMI f English
Variant of TAMMY.
TAMIA f English (Modern)
Elaborated form of the popular name syllable Tam, from names such as TAMARA or TAMIKA. It was popularized by Canadian singer Tamia Hill (1975-), who is known simply as Tamia.
TAMIKA f English
Variant of TAMIKO, inspired by the American jazz singer Tamiko Jones (1945-) or the American movie 'A Girl Named Tamiko' (1963).
TAMMI f English
Variant of TAMMY.
TAMMIE f English
Variant of TAMMY.
TAMMY f English
Short form of TAMARA and other names beginning with Tam.
TAMRA f English
Contracted form of TAMARA.
TAMSIN f English (British)
Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.
TANIA f English, Italian
Variant of TANYA.
TANNER m English
From an English surname meaning "one who tans hides".
TANSY f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Old French from Late Latin tanacita.
TANYA f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of TATIANA. It began to be used in the English-speaking world during the 1930s.
TARA (1) f English
Anglicized form of the Irish place name Teamhair, which possibly means "elevated place" in Gaelic. This was the name of the sacred hill near Dublin where the Irish high kings resided. It was popularized as a given name by the novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939), in which it is the name of the O'Hara plantation.
TARINA f English (Rare)
Perhaps an elaborated form of TARA (1).
TARYN f English
Probably a feminine form of TYRONE. Actors Tyrone Power and Linda Christian created it for their daughter Taryn Power (1953-).
TASHA f Russian, English
Short form of NATASHA.
TATE m English
From an English surname that was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.
TATIANA f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TATTON m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's town" in Old English.
TATUM f English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.
TAWNY f English (Modern)
From the English word, ultimately deriving from Old French tané, which means "light brown".
TAYLA f English (Modern)
Probably a feminine form of TAYLOR influenced by similar-sounding names such as KAYLA.
TAYLER f & m English (Modern)
Variant of TAYLOR.
TAYLOR m & f English
From an English surname that originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by the British-American author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TEAGAN m & f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.
TEAL f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of duck or the greenish-blue colour.
TED m English
Short form of EDWARD or THEODORE. A famous bearer was the American baseball player Ted Williams (1918-2002), who was born as Theodore.
TEDDY m English
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
TEMPERANCE f English (Archaic)
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
TEMPEST f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "storm". It appears in the title of William Shakespeare's play 'The Tempest' (1611).
TEMPLE m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that originally belonged to a person who was associated with the Knights Templar, a medieval religious military order.
TENNYSON m English (Rare)
From an English surname that meant "son of Tenney", Tenney being a medieval form of DENIS. A notable bearer of the surname was British poet Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892).
TERA f English
Variant of TARA (1).
TERANCE m English
Variant of TERENCE.
TERELL m English
Variant of TERRELL.
TERENCE m English
From the Roman family name Terentius, which is of unknown meaning. Famous bearers include Publius Terentius Afer, a Roman playwright, and Marcus Terentius Varro, a Roman scholar. It was also borne by several early saints. The name was used in Ireland as an Anglicized form of TOIRDHEALBHACH, but it was not in use as an English name until the late 19th century.
TERESA f Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Form of THERESA used in several languages. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse of Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
TERI f English
Either a feminine variant of TERRY (1) or a diminutive of THERESA.
TERRA f English
Variant of TARA (1), perhaps influenced by the Latin word terra meaning "land, earth".
TERRANCE m English
Variant of TERENCE.
TERRELL m English
From an English surname that was probably derived from the Norman French nickname tirel "to pull", referring to a stubborn person. It may sometimes be given in honour of civil rights activist Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954).
TERRENCE m English
Variant of TERENCE.
TERRI f English
Either a feminine variant of TERRY (1) or a diminutive of THERESA.
TERRIE f English
Either a feminine variant of TERRY (1) or a diminutive of THERESA.
TERRY (1) m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of THEODORIC.
TERRY (2) m & f English
Diminutive of TERENCE or THERESA. A famous bearer was Terry Fox (1958-1981), a young man with an artificial leg who attempted to run across Canada to raise money for cancer research. He died of the disease before crossing the country.
TESS f English, Dutch
Diminutive of THERESA. This is the name of the main character in Thomas Hardy's novel 'Tess of the D'Ubervilles' (1891).
TESSA f English
Diminutive of THERESA.
TESSIE f English
Diminutive of THERESA.
TEX m English
From a nickname denoting a person who came from the state of Texas. A famous bearer was the American animator Tex Avery (1908-1980), real name Frederick, who was born in Texas.
THAD m English
Short form of THADDEUS.
THADDEUS m English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From Θαδδαιος (Thaddaios), the Greek form of the Aramaic name Thaddai. It is possibly derived from a word meaning "heart", but it may in fact be an Aramaic form of a Greek name such as Θεοδωρος (see THEODORE). In the Gospel of Matthew, Thaddaeus is listed as one of the twelve apostles, though elsewhere in the New Testament his name is omitted and Jude's appears instead. It is likely that the two names refer to the same person.
THANE m English (Rare)
From the Scottish and English noble title, which was originally from Old English thegn.
THANKFUL f English (Archaic)
From the English word thankful. This was one of the many virtue names used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
THELMA f English
Meaning unknown. It was a rare name when British author Marie Corelli used it for the Norwegian heroine of her novel 'Thelma' (1887). The name became popular around the end of the 19th century after the novel was published. It is sometimes claimed to derive from Greek θελημα (thelema) meaning "will", though this seems unlikely.
THEO m English, Dutch
Short form of THEODORE, THEOBALD, and other names that begin with Theo.
THEOBALD m English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and bald "bold". The Normans brought the name to England, where it joined an existing Old English cognate. The medieval forms Tibald and Tebald were commonly Latinized as Theobaldus. It was rare by the 20th century.
THEODORA f English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THEODORE m English
From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". The name Dorothea is derived from the same roots in reverse order. This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.... [more]
THERESA f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Spanish and Portuguese name Teresa. It was first recorded as Therasia, being borne by the Spanish wife of Saint Paulinus of Nola in the 4th century. The meaning is uncertain, but it could be derived from Greek θερος (theros) "summer", from Greek θεριζω (therizo) "to harvest", or from the name of the Greek island of Therasia (the western island of Santorini).... [more]
THERESE f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German and Scandinavian variant of THERESA.
THOM m English
Short form of THOMAS.
THOMAS m English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') meaning "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.... [more]
THOMASINA f English
Medieval feminine form of THOMAS.
THORBURN m English (Rare)
From a Scottish and English surname that was derived from the Norse name Þórbjǫrn (see TORBJÖRN).
THORLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "thorn clearing" in Old English.
THORNTON m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
THURSTAN m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the Norse name Þórsteinn (see TORSTEN).
TIA f English
Short form of names ending with tia. It has been suggested that its use since the 1950s is the result of the brand name for the coffee liqueur Tia Maria. In the brand name, Tia is not a given name; rather, it means "aunt" in Spanish or Portuguese.
TIANA f English
Short form of TATIANA or CHRISTIANA.
TIARA f English (Modern)
From the English word for a semicircle crown, ultimately of Greek origin.
TIBBY f & m English
Diminutive of TABITHA or THEOBALD.
TIERNEY m & f Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNACH. In part, it is from a surname derived from the given name.
TIFFANI f English
Variant of TIFFANY.
TIFFANY f English
Medieval form of THEOPHANIA. This name was traditionally given to girls born on the Epiphany (January 6), the festival commemorating the visit of the Magi to the infant Jesus. The name died out after the Middle Ages, but it was revived by the movie 'Breakfast at Tiffany's' (1961), the title of which refers to the Tiffany's jewelry store in New York.
TIGER m English (Rare)
From the name of the large striped cat, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek τιγρις (tigris), ultimately of Iranian origin. A famous bearer is American golfer Tiger Woods (1975-).
TILDA f English, Swedish, Finnish
Short form of MATILDA.
TILLIE f English
Diminutive of MATILDA.
TILLY f English
Diminutive of MATILDA.
TIM m English, German, Dutch, Slovene, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of TIMOTHY or (in Germany) DIETMAR. It was borne by the fictional character Tiny Tim, the ill son of Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843).
TIMMY m English
Diminutive of TIMOTHY.
TIMOTHA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of TIMOTHY.
TIMOTHY m English, Biblical
English form of the Greek name Τιμοθεος (Timotheos) meaning "honouring God", derived from τιμαω (timao) "to honour" and θεος (theos) "god". Saint Timothy was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys and was the recipient of two of Paul's epistles that appear in the New Testament. He was of both Jewish and Greek ancestry. According to tradition, he was martyred at Ephesus after protesting the worship of Artemis. As an English name, Timothy was not used until after the Protestant Reformation.
TINA f English, Italian, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Short form of CHRISTINA, MARTINA, and other names ending in tina. In addition to these names, it is also used in Dutch as a diminutive of CATHARINA and in Croatian as a diminutive of KATARINA.
TITTY f English
Diminutive of LETITIA. This is now a slang word for the female breast, and the name has subsequently dropped out of common use.
TITUS m Ancient Roman, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to Latin titulus "title of honour". It is more likely of Oscan origin, since it was borne by the legendary Sabine king Titus Tatius.... [more]
TOBIAS m Biblical, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of TOBIAH. This is the name of the hero of the apocryphal Book of Tobit, which appears in many English versions of the Old Testament. It relates how Tobit's son Tobias, with the help of the angel Raphael, is able to drive away a demon who has plagued Sarah, who subsequently becomes his wife. This story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the name came into occasional use in parts of Europe at that time. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation.
TOBIN m English
From an English surname that was itself derived from the given name TOBIAS.
TOBY m & f English
Medieval form of TOBIAS. It was sometimes used as a feminine name in the 1930s and 40s due to the influence of American actress Toby Wing (1915-2001).
TOD m English
Variant of TODD.
TODD m English
From a surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde.
TOM (1) m English, Dutch, German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Short form of THOMAS. Tom Sawyer was the main character in several of Mark Twain's novels, first appearing in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876). Other famous bearers include American actors Tom Hanks (1956-) and Tom Cruise (1962-).
TOMMIE m & f English
Diminutive of THOMAS, sometimes used as a feminine form.
TOMMY m English
Diminutive of THOMAS.
TONI (2) f English
Short form of ANTONIA.
TONIA f English
Variant of TONYA.
TONY m English
Short form of ANTHONY.
TONYA f English, Russian
English diminutive of ANTONIA or a Russian diminutive of ANTONINA. In the English-speaking world its use has likely been positively influenced by the name TANYA.
TOPAZ f English (Rare)
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τοπαζος (topazos).
TOPHER m English
Short form of CHRISTOPHER.
TOPSY f English (Rare)
From a nickname that is of unknown meaning, perhaps deriving from the English word top. This is the name of a young slave in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852).
TORI f English
Diminutive of VICTORIA.
TORIA f English
Short form of VICTORIA.
TORY (2) f English
Variant of TORI.
TOTTIE f English
Diminutive of CHARLOTTE.
TOTTY f English
Diminutive of CHARLOTTE.
TRACE m English
Short form of TRACY.
TRACEE f English
Feminine variant of TRACY.
TRACEY f & m English
Variant of TRACY.
TRACI f English
Feminine variant of TRACY.
TRACIE f English
Feminine variant of TRACY.
TRACY f & m English
From an English surname that was taken from a Norman French place name meaning "domain belonging to THRACIUS". Charles Dickens used it for a male character in his novel 'The Pickwick Papers' (1837). It was later popularized as a feminine name by the main character Tracy Lord in the movie 'The Philadelphia Story' (1940). This name is also sometimes used as a diminutive of THERESA.
TRAFFORD m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "fish-trap ford" in Old English.
TRANTER m English (Rare)
From a surname meaning "wagoner" in Old English.
TRAVERS m English (Rare)
From the surname TRAVERS.
TRAVIS m English
From the English surname Travis (a variant of TRAVERS). It was used in America in honour of William Travis (1809-1836), the commander of the Texan forces at the Battle of the Alamo.
TREASURE f English (Modern)
From the English word, ultimately from Greek θησαυρος (thesauros) "treasure, collection".
TRENT m English
From a surname that originally denoted someone who lived by the River Trent in England. Trent is also a city in Italy, though the etymology is unrelated.
TRENTON m English
From the name of a New Jersey city established in the 17th century by William Trent. It means "TRENT's town".
TREV m Welsh, English
Short form of TREVOR.
TREVELYAN m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a Cornish place name meaning "homestead on the hill".
TREVOR m Welsh, English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "big village" from Welsh tref "village" and mawr "large".
TREY m English
From an English nickname meaning "three".
TRIA f English (Rare)
Perhaps a short form of DEMETRIA and other names ending in a similar sound.
TRICIA f English
Short form of PATRICIA.
TRINA f English
Short form of KATRINA.
TRINITY f English
From the English word Trinity, given in honour of the Christian belief that God has one essence, but three distinct expressions of being: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It has only been in use as a given name since the 20th century.
TRISH f English
Short form of PATRICIA.
TRISHA f English
Short form of PATRICIA.
TRISTA f English
Feminine form of TRISTAN.
TRISTAN m Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion that makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
TRISTEN m & f English (Modern)
Variant of TRISTAN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
TRISTIN m & f English (Modern)
Variant of TRISTAN, sometimes used as a feminine form.
TRISTRAM m English (British)
Medieval English form of TRISTAN.
TRIX f English
Short form of BEATRIX.
TRIXIE f English
Diminutive of BEATRIX.
TROY m English
From a surname that originally denoted a person from the city of Troyes in France. This was also the name of the ancient city that was besieged by the Greeks in Homer's 'Iliad'.
TRUDI f German, English
Diminutive of GERTRUDE and other Germanic names ending with the element thrud "strength".
TRUDIE f English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
TRUDY f English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
TRUEMAN m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of TRUMAN.
TRUMAN m English
From a surname that meant "trusty man" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It was also borne by American writer Truman Capote (1924-1984).
TUCKER m English (Modern)
From an occupational surname for a cloth fuller, derived from Old English tucian meaning "offend, torment". A fuller was a person who cleaned and thickened raw cloth by pounding it.
TWILA f English
Meaning unknown. Perhaps based on the English word twilight, or maybe from a Cajun pronunciation of French étoile "star". It came into use as an American given name in the late 19th century.
TWYLA f English
Variant of TWILA.
TY m English
Short form of TYLER, TYSON, TYRONE, and other names beginning with Ty.
TYE m English
From a surname meaning "pasture" in Middle English.
TYLER m English
From an English surname meaning "tiler of roofs". The surname was borne by American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
TYRELL m English (Modern)
From a surname that was a variant of TERRELL.
TYRON m English
Variant of TYRONE.
TYRONE m English
From the name of a county in Northern Ireland, which is derived from Irish Gaelic Tir Eoghain meaning "land of EOGHAN". This name was popularized by American actor Tyrone Power (1914-1958), who was named after his great-grandfather, an Irish actor.
TYRRELL m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of TERRELL.
TYSON m English
From an English surname that could be derived from a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French tison meaning "firebrand". Alternatively, it could be a variant of DYSON. A famous bearer of the surname was boxer Mike Tyson (1966-).
ULRIC m English (Rare)
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf power". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of ULRICH.
ULYSSA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of ULYSSES.
ULYSSES m Roman Mythology, English
Latin form of ODYSSEUS. It was borne by Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War, who went on to become an American president. Irish author James Joyce used it as the title of his book 'Ulysses' (1920), which loosely parallels Homer's epic the 'Odyssey'.
UNIQUE f English (Modern)
From the English word unique, ultimately derived from Latin unicus.
UNITY f English (Rare)
From the English word unity, which is ultimately derived from Latin unitas.
UPTON m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "upper town" in Old English. A famous bearer of this name was the American novelist Upton Sinclair (1878-1968).
URSULA f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
VAL m & f English
Short form of VALENTINE (1), VALERIE, and other names beginning with Val.
VALARIE f English
Variant of VALERIE.
VALE f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "wide river valley".
VALENTINE (1) m English
From the Roman cognomen Valentinus, which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.
VALERIE f English, German, Czech
English and German form of VALERIA and Czech variant of VALÉRIE.
VALORIE f English
Variant of VALERIE.
VAN m English
Short form of names containing van, such as VANCE or IVAN.
VANCE m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
VANESSA f English, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem 'Cadenus and Vanessa' (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
VAUGHN m Welsh, English
From a Welsh surname that was derived from Welsh bychan meaning "little".
VELDA f English
Meaning unknown, possibly a derivative of the Germanic element wald meaning "power, rule".
VELMA f English
Probably a variant of WILMA, the spelling with an e perhaps due to the influence of SELMA (1). This name has been in use since the 19th century.
VELVET f English
From the English word for the soft fabric. It became used as a given name after the main character in Enid Bagnold's book 'National Velvet' (1935) and the movie (1944) and television (1960) adaptations.
VENETIA f English
Originally this was probably a Latinized form of GWYNEDD or GWYNETH. It also coincides with the name of the city in Italy, called Venice in English. This name was borne by the celebrated beauty Venetia Stanley (1600-1633). Benjamin Disraeli used it in his novel entitled 'Venetia' (1837).
VERA (1) f Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Georgian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERE m English
From a Norman surname, which was from a French place name, which was itself derived from a Gaulish word meaning "alder".
VERGIL m English
Variant of VIRGIL.
VERITY f English
From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
VERN m English
Short form of VERNON.
VERNA f English
Feminine form of VERNON, sometimes associated with the Latin word vernus "spring". It has been in use since the 19th century.
VERNON m English
From a Norman surname, which was from a French place name, ultimately derived from the Gaulish word vern meaning "alder".
VERONICA f English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VEVA f English
Possibly a diminutive of GENEVIEVE.
VI f English
Short form of VIOLET.
VIANNE f English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps a combination of VI and ANNE (1) or a short form of VIVIANNE.
VIC m & f English
Short form of VICTOR or VICTORIA.
VICKI f English
Diminutive of VICTORIA.
VICKIE f English
Diminutive of VICTORIA.
VICKY f English
Diminutive of VICTORIA.
VICTOR m English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
VICTORIA f English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.... [more]
VIKKI f English
Diminutive of VICTORIA.
VIN m English
Short form of VINCENT.
VINAL m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "vine hall" in Middle English.
VINCE m English, Hungarian
English short form and Hungarian normal form of VINCENT.
VINCENT m English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VINNIE m & f English
Diminutive of VINCENT or other names containing vin.
VINNY m English
Diminutive of VINCENT.
VIOLA f English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
VIOLET f English
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
VIONA f English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of FIONA influenced by VIOLA.
VIRGEE f English
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
VIRGIE f English
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
VIRGIL m English, Romanian
From the Roman family name Vergilius, which is of unknown meaning. This name was borne by the 1st-century BC Roman poet Publius Vergilius Maro, commonly called Virgil, who was the writer of the 'Aeneid'. Due to him, Virgil has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
VIRGINIA f English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius, which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.... [more]
VIVIAN m & f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Latin name Vivianus, which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
VIVIETTE f English (Rare)
Diminutive of VIVIENNE. William John Locke used this name for the title character in his novel 'Viviette' (1910).
VONDA f English
Variant of WANDA, reflecting the Polish pronunciation.
WADE m English
From an English surname, either WADE (1) or WADE (2).
WALDO m English, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element wald meaning "rule". In the Middle Ages this name became the basis for a surname. Its present use in the English-speaking world is usually in honour of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism. He was (probably) named after the 12th-century Christian radical Peter Waldo, who was from Lyons in France. Though Waldo and his followers, called the Waldensians, were declared heretics at the time, they were later admired by Protestants.
WALKER m English
From an English surname that referred to the medieval occupational of a walker, also known as a fuller. Walkers would tread on wet, unprocessed wool in order to clean and thicken it. The word ultimately derives from Old English wealcan "to walk".
WALLACE m English, Scottish
From a Scottish and English surname that originally meant "Welsh" or "foreigner" in Norman French. It was first used as given name in honour of Sir William Wallace, a Scottish hero who led the fight against English invasion in the 13th century.
WALLIS m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of WALLACE. Wallis Simpson (1895-1986) was the divorced woman whom Edward VIII married, which forced him to abdicate the British throne.
WALLY m English
Diminutive of WALTER or WALLACE.
WALT m English
Short form of WALTER.
WALTER m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WALTON m English
From a surname that was originally taken from various Old English place names meaning "stream town", "wood town", or "wall town".
WANDA f Polish, English, German, French
Possibly from a Germanic name meaning "a Wend", referring to the Slavic people who inhabited eastern Germany. In Polish legends this was the name of the daughter of King Krak, the legendary founder of Krakow. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by the author Ouida, who used it for the heroine in her novel 'Wanda' (1883).
WARD m English
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
WARDELL m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "watch hill" in Old English.
WARNER m English
From a Norman surname that was derived from the given name WERNER.
WARREN m English
From an English surname that was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy. This name was borne by the American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
WARRICK m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of WARWICK.
WARWICK m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the name of a town in England, itself from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wíc "settlement".
WASHINGTON m English
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English town, itself meaning "settlement belonging to WASSA's people". The given name is usually given in honour of George Washington (1732-1799), commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and the first president of the United States.
WAT m English
Medieval short form of WALTER.
WAYLAND m English
From Weland, the Old English cognate of WIELAND.
WAYLON m English
Variant of WAYLAND. This name was popularized by country music singer Waylon Jennings (1937-2002), who was originally named Wayland.
WAYNE m English
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
WEBSTER m English
From an occupational surname meaning "weaver", derived from Old English webba.
WELDON m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "hill near a spring" in Old English.
WENDELL m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name WENDEL.
WENDI f English
Variant of WENDY.
WENDY f English
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play 'Peter Pan' (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name GWENDOLEN and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.
WES m English
Short form of WESLEY.
WESLEY m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WESTLEY m English
From a surname that was a variant of WESLEY.
WESTON m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west town" in Old English.
WHITAKER m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "white field" in Old English.
WHITNEY f & m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WIL m & f English, Dutch
Short form of WILLIAM and other names beginning with Wil.
WILBUR m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane. Wright was named after the Methodist minister Wilbur Fisk (1792-1839).
WILBURN m English
From a surname that was probably originally derived from an unknown place name. The second element corresponds with Old English burne "stream".
WILDA f English
Meaning unknown, perhaps from a German surname, or perhaps from the English word wild. It has been in use since the 19th century.
WILEY m English
From a surname that was derived from various English place names: towns named WILLEY or the River WYLYE.
WILF m English
Short form of WILFRED.
WILFORD m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow ford" in Old English.
WILFRED m English
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace". Saint Wilfrid was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
WILFREDA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of WILFRED.
WILFRID m English
Variant of WILFRED.
WILHELMINA f Dutch, German, English
Dutch and German feminine form of WILHELM. This name was borne by a queen of the Netherlands (1880-1962).
WILKIE m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILL m English
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WILLA f English
Feminine form of WILLIAM.
WILLARD m English
From an English surname that was derived from the Germanic given name WILLIHARD (or the Old English cognate Wilheard).
WILLIAM m English
From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.... [more]