English Names

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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PATRICIA f English, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK). In medieval England this spelling appears in Latin documents, but this form was probably not used as the actual name until the 18th century, in Scotland.
PATRICK m Irish, English, French, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.... [more]
PATSY f & m English, Irish
Variant of PATTY, also used as a diminutive of PATRICK.
PATTI f English
Variant of PATTY.
PATTIE f English
Variant of PATTY.
PATTON m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of PATRICK. A notable bearer of the surname was the American World War II general George S. Patton (1885-1945), who played an important part in the allied offensive in France.
PATTY f English
Originally a variant of Matty, a 17th-century diminutive of MARTHA. It is now commonly used as a diminutive of PATRICIA.
PAUL m English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
PAULA f German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
PAULETTA f English
Latinate feminine diminutive of PAUL.
PAULETTE f French, English
French feminine diminutive of PAUL.
PAULIE m English
Diminutive of PAUL.
PAULINE f French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAXTON m English (Modern)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "Pœcc's town". Pœcc is an Old English given name of unknown meaning.
PAYTON f & m English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEACE f English (Rare)
From the English word peace, ultimately derived from Latin pax.
PEARL f English
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PEARLE f English
Variant of PEARL.
PEARLIE f English
Diminutive of PEARL.
PEG f English
Short form of PEGGY.
PEGGIE f English
Variant of PEGGY.
PEGGY f English
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of MARGARET. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
PEN f English
Short form of PENELOPE.
PENE f English (Rare)
Short form of PENELOPE.
PENELOPE f Greek Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PENNY f English
Diminutive of PENELOPE.
PEONY f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower. It was originally believed to have healing qualities, so it was named after the Greek medical god Pæon.
PERCE m English
Short form of PERCY.
PERCIVAL m Arthurian Romance, English
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem 'Perceval, the Story of the Grail'. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail. The character (and probably the name) of Perceval was based on that of the Welsh hero PEREDUR. The spelling was perhaps altered under the influence of Old French percer val "to pierce the valley".
PERCY m English
From an English surname that was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name that was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias'. This name can also be used as a short form of PERCIVAL.
PEREGRINE m English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
PERLIE f English (Rare)
Diminutive of PEARL.
PERMELIA f English (Archaic)
Meaning unknown, possibly an early American alteration of PAMELA.
PERONEL f English (Archaic)
Contracted form of PETRONEL.
PERRY m English
From a surname that is either English or Welsh in origin. It can be derived from Middle English perrie meaning "pear tree", or else from Welsh ap Herry, meaning "son of HERRY". A famous bearer of the surname was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
PETA f English (Australian)
Feminine form of PETER.
PETE m English
Short form of PETER.
PETER m English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.... [more]
PETRA f German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
PETRINA f English (Rare)
Diminutive of PETRA.
PETRONEL f English (Archaic)
Medieval English form of PETRONILLA.
PETULA f English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, created in the 20th century. The name is borne by the British singer Petula Clark (1932-), whose name was invented by her father.
PETUNIA f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, derived ultimately from a Tupi (South American) word.
PEYTON m & f English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).
PHEBE f English, Biblical
Variant of PHOEBE used in some translations of the New Testament.
PHEOBE f English
Variant of PHOEBE.
PHIL m English
Short form of PHILIP and various other names beginning with Phil, often a Greek element meaning "friend, dear, beloved".
PHILADELPHIA f English (Rare)
From the name of a city in Asia Minor mentioned in Revelation in the New Testament. The name of the city meant "brotherly love" from Greek φιλεω (phileo) "to love" and αδελφος (adelphos) "brother". It is also the name of a city in the United States.
PHILANDER m English (Archaic), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Φιλανδρος (Philandros) meaning "friend of man" from Greek φιλος (philos) "friend" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). It was the name of a son of Apollo with the nymph Acalle. In the 18th century this was coined as a word meaning "to womanize", and the name subsequently dropped out of use.
PHILIP m English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Greek name Φιλιππος (Philippos) meaning "friend of horses", composed of the elements φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.... [more]
PHILIPA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of PHILIP.
PHILIPPA f English (British), German
Latinate feminine form of PHILIP.
PHILLIP m English
Variant of PHILIP, inspired by the usual spelling of the surname.
PHILLIPA f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of PHILIP.
PHILLIS f English
Variant of PHYLLIS.
PHILOMENA f English, German, Late Greek
From Greek φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and μενος (menos) "mind, strength, force". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in the 19th century after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομηνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
PHOEBE f English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHOENIX m & f English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird that appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
PHYLISS f English
Variant of PHYLLIS.
PHYLLIDA f English (Rare)
From Φυλλιδος (Phyllidos), the genitive form of PHYLLIS. This form was used in 17th-century pastoral poetry.
PHYLLIS f Greek Mythology, English, German
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
PIERCE m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name PIERS.
PIERS m English (British), Medieval French
Medieval form of PETER. This was the name of the main character in the 14th-century poem 'Piers Plowman' by William Langland.
PIETY f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "piety, devoutness". This was a rare virtue name used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
PIP m & f English
Diminutive of PHILIP or PHILIPPA. This was the name of the main character in 'Great Expectations' (1860) by Charles Dickens.
PIPER f English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.
PIPPA f English
Diminutive of PHILIPPA.
PLACID m English (Rare)
English form of Placidus (see PLACIDO).
PLEASANCE f English (Archaic)
From the medieval name Plaisance, which meant "pleasant" in Old French.
POLLIE f English
Variant of POLLY.
POLLY f English
Medieval variant of MOLLY. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
POPPY f English (British)
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
PORSCHE f English (Modern)
From the name of the German car company, which was founded by Ferdinand Porsche (1875-1951). His surname is derived from the given name BORIS.
PORTER m English
From an occupational English surname meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
PORTIA f English
Variant of Porcia, the feminine form of the Roman family name PORCIUS, used by William Shakespeare for the heroine of his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596). In the play Portia is a woman who disguises herself as a man in order to defend Antonio in court. It is also the name of a moon of Uranus, after the Shakespearean character.
POSIE f English
Variant of POSY.
POSY f English
Diminutive of JOSEPHINE. It can also be inspired by the English word posy for a bunch of flowers.
PRAISE f English (Rare)
From the English word praise, which is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Late Latin preciare, a derivative of Latin pretium "price, worth".
PRECIOUS f English (Modern)
From the English word precious, ultimately derived from Latin pretiosus, a derivative of Latin pretium "price, worth".
PRESLEY f & m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PRESTON m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest town" (Old English preost and tun).
PRIMROSE f English (Rare)
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".
PRIMULA f English (Rare)
From the name of a genus of several species of flowers, including the primrose. It is derived from the Latin word primulus meaning "very first".
PRINCE m English
From the English word prince, a royal title, which comes ultimately from Latin princeps. This name was borne by the American musician Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016), who is known simply as Prince.
PRINCESS f English (Modern)
Feminine equivalent of PRINCE.
PRIS f English
Short form of PRISCILLA.
PRISCILLA f English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).
PRISSY f English
Diminutive of PRISCILLA.
PROSPER m French, English
From the Latin name Prosperus, which meant "fortunate, successful". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a supporter of Saint Augustine. It has never been common as an English name, though the Puritans used it, partly because it is identical to the English word prosper.
PRU f English
Short form of PRUDENCE.
PRUDENCE f & m English, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
PRUE f English
Short form of PRUDENCE.
PRUNELLA f English (Rare)
From the English word for the type of flower, also called self-heal, ultimately a derivative of the Latin word pruna "plum".
PURDIE m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the Norman French expression pur die "by God". It was perhaps originally a nickname for a person who used the oath frequently.
QUEEN f English
From an old nickname that was derived from the English word queen, ultimately from Old English cwen meaning "woman, wife".
QUEENIE f English
Diminutive of QUEEN.
QUENTIN m French, English
French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England. In America it was brought to public attention by president Theodore Roosevelt's son Quentin Roosevelt (1897-1918), who was killed in World War I.
QUINCY m English
From a surname that was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the personal name QUINTIUS. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts.
QUINLAN m English (Rare)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Caoinlean meaning "descendant of Caoinlean". The name Caoinlean means "slender" in Gaelic.
QUINN m & f Irish, English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
QUINTELLA f English (Rare)
Feminine diminutive of QUINTUS.
QUINTEN m English, Dutch
Variant and Dutch form of QUENTIN.
QUINTIN m English
Variant of QUENTIN.
QUINTON m English
Variant of QUENTIN, also coinciding with an English surname meaning "queen's town" in Old English.
RACHAEL f English
Variant of RACHEL, the spelling probably influenced by that of Michael.
RACHEAL f English
Variant of RACHEL.
RACHEL f English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob. Jacob was tricked by her father Laban into marrying her older sister Leah first, though in exchange for seven years of work Laban allowed Jacob to marry Rachel too. Initially barren and facing her husband's anger, she offered her handmaid Bilhah to Jacob to bear him children. Eventually she was herself able to conceive, becoming the mother of Joseph and Benjamin.... [more]
RACHELLE f English
Variant of RACHEL influenced by the spelling of ROCHELLE.
RACQUEL f English
Variant of RAQUEL.
RADCLIFF m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "red cliff" in Old English.
RADCLYFFE m English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of RADCLIFF.
RAE f English
Short form of RACHEL. It can also be used as a feminine form of RAY.
RAEBURN m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "stream where does drink" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was Scottish portrait painter Sir Henry Raeburn (1756-1823).
RAELENE f English (Rare)
Combination of RAE and the popular name suffix lene.
RAELYN f English (Modern)
Combination of RAE and the popular name suffix lyn.
RAELYNN f English (Modern)
Combination of RAE and the popular name suffix lynn.
RAFE m English
Variant of RALPH. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
RAFFERTY m English
From an Irish surname that was an Anglicized form of Ó Rabhartaigh meaning "descendant of Rabhartach". The given name Rabhartach means "flood tide".
RAIN (1) f & m English (Rare)
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.
RAINBOW f English (Rare)
From the English word for the arc of multicoloured light that can appear in a misty sky.
RAINE f & m English (Rare)
Possibly based on the French word reine meaning "queen". A famous bearer is the British socialite Raine Spencer (1929-), the stepmother of Princess Diana. In modern times it can also be used as a variant of RAIN (1) or a short form of LORRAINE.
RALEIGH m English
From a surname that was from a place name meaning either "red clearing" or "roe deer clearing" in Old English.
RALPH m English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman Conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
RALPHIE m English
Diminutive of RALPH.
RAMONA f Spanish, Romanian, English
Feminine form of RAMÓN. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Helen Hunt Jackson's novel 'Ramona' (1884), as well as several subsequent movies based on the book.
RAMSEY m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "wild-garlic island" in Old English.
RANDAL m English
Variant of RANDALL.
RANDALL m English
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name RANDEL.
RANDELL m English
Variant of RANDALL.
RANDI (1) f English
Diminutive of MIRANDA.
RANDOLF m English
From the Germanic elements rand meaning "rim (of a shield)" and wulf meaning "wolf". The Normans brought this name to England, where there existed already an Old Norse cognate Randúlfr, which had been introduced by Scandinavian settlers. Randolf became rare after the Middle Ages, though it was revived in the 18th century (usually in the spelling Randolph).
RANDOLPH m English
Variant of RANDOLF. This spelling was adopted in the 18th century.
RANDY m & f English
Diminutive of RANDALL, RANDOLF or MIRANDA.
RAPHAEL m German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) meaning "God heals", from the roots רָפָא (rafa') meaning "to heal" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In Hebrew tradition Raphael is the name of an archangel. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.... [more]
RAQUEL f Spanish, Portuguese, English
Spanish and Portuguese form of RACHEL.
RASTUS m English (Rare)
Short form of ERASTUS.
RAVEN f & m English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
RAVENNA f English (Rare)
Either an elaboration of RAVEN, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.
RAY m English
Short form of RAYMOND, often used as an independent name. It coincides with an English word meaning "beam of light". Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) and musician Ray Charles (1930-2004) are two notable bearers of the name.
RAYLENE f English (Rare)
Combination of RAY and the popular name suffix lene.
RAYMOND m English, French
From the Germanic name Raginmund, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and mund "protector". The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Reimund. It was borne by several medieval (mostly Spanish) saints, including Saint Raymond Nonnatus, the patron of midwives and expectant mothers, and Saint Raymond of Peñafort, the patron of canonists.
RAYNARD m English
Variant of REYNARD.
RAYNER m English (Archaic)
From the Germanic name Raganhar, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hari "army". The Normans brought this name to England where it came into general use, though it was rare by the end of the Middle Ages.
READ m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of REED.
REAGAN f & m English (Modern), Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN". This surname was borne by American president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
REBA f English
Short form of REBECCA.
REBECCA f English, Italian, Swedish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name רִבְקָה (Rivqah) from an unattested root probably meaning "join, tie, snare". This is the name of the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob in the Old Testament. It came into use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular with the Puritans in the 17th century.
REBEKAH f Biblical, English
Form of REBECCA used in some versions of the Bible.
RED m English
From the English word, ultimately derived from Old English read. It was originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion.
REDD m English (Rare)
Variant of RED.
REED m English
From an English surname that is derived from Old English read meaning "red", originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion.
REENIE f English (Rare)
Either a variant of RENÉE or a diminutive of names ending in reen.
REESE m & f Welsh, English
Anglicized form of RHYS, also used as a feminine form.
REG m English
Short form of REGINALD.
REGAN f English
Meaning unknown, probably of Celtic origin. Shakespeare took the name from earlier British legends and used it in his tragedy 'King Lear' (1606) for a treacherous daughter of the king. In the modern era it has appeared in the horror movie 'The Exorcist' (1973) belonging to a girl possessed by the devil. This name can also be used as a variant of REAGAN.
REGANA f English (Rare)
Elaboration of REGAN, influenced by REGINA.
REGENA f English
Variant of REGINA.
REGGIE m English
Diminutive of REGINALD.
REGINA f English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
REGINALD m English
From Reginaldus, a Latinized form of REYNOLD.
REID m English
From a surname, a Scots variant of REED.
REILLY m & f English (Modern)
From an Irish surname that was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
REMINGTON m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from the name of the town of Rimington in Lancashire, itself meaning "settlement on the Riming stream". It may be given in honour of the American manufacturer Eliphalet Remington (1793-1861) or his sons, founders of the firearms company that bears their name.
RENA f English
Latinate feminine form of RENÉ.
RENAE f English
English variant of RENÉE.
RENE m & f English
English form of RENÉ or RENÉE.
RENEE f English
English form of RENÉE.
RENIE f English (Rare)
Possibly a diminutive of RENEE.
RENITA f English
Probably a feminine form of RENATUS. It came into use during the 1950s.
REUBEN m Biblical, Hebrew, English
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.
REX m English
From Latin rex "king". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
REXANNE f English (Rare)
Variant of ROXANE influenced by REX.
REYNARD m English (Rare)
From the Germanic name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England in the form Reinard, though it never became very common there. In medieval fables the name was borne by the sly hero Reynard the Fox (with the result that renard has become a French word meaning "fox").
REYNOLD m English
From the Germanic name Raginald, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and wald "rule". The Normans (who used forms like Reinald or Reinold) brought the name to Britain, where it reinforced rare Old English and Norse cognates already in existence. It was common during the Middle Ages, but became more rare after the 15th century.
RHETT m English
From a surname, an Anglicized form of the Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel". Margaret Mitchell used this name for the character Rhett Butler in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936).
RHETTA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of RHETT.
RHIANNA f English (Modern)
Probably a variant of RHIANNON.
RHIANNON f Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.... [more]
RHODA f Biblical, English
Derived from Greek ‘ροδον (rhodon) meaning "rose". In the New Testament this name was borne by a maid in the house of Mary the mother of John Mark. As an English given name, Rhoda came into use in the 17th century.
RHONDA f English
Probably intended to mean "good spear" from Welsh rhon "spear" and da "good", but possibly influenced by the name of the Rhondda Valley in South Wales, which means "noisy". It has been in use only since the 20th century. Its use may have been partially inspired by Margaret Mackworth, Viscountess Rhondda (1883-1956), a British feminist.
RHYS m Welsh, English
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name, including the 12th-century Rhys ap Gruffydd who fought against the invading Normans.
RIAN m English
Variant of RYAN.
RICA f English (Rare)
Short form of FREDERICA and other names ending in rica.
RICH m English
Short form of RICHARD.
RICHARD m English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
RICHARDINE f English (Rare)
Feminine form of RICHARD.
RICHELLE f English
Variant of RACHEL, probably influenced by MICHELLE.
RICHIE m English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICHMAL f English (Rare)
Meaning uncertain, possibly a combination of RICHARD and MARY. This name has been used since at least the late 18th century, mainly confined to the town of Bury in Lancashire.
RICK m English
Short form of RICHARD or names ending in rick.
RICKEY m English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKI m & f English
Masculine and feminine diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKIE m English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKY m English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RIDLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from various English place names meaning "reed clearing" or "channel clearing" in Old English.
RIGBY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "ridge farm" in Old Norse.
RIKKI f English (Modern)
Feminine form of RICKY.
RILEY m & f English
From a surname that comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
RILLA f English
Meaning unknown, perhaps a short form of names ending in rilla.
RIPLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname that originally came from a place name that meant "strip clearing" in Old English.
RITA f Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
RITCHIE m English
Variant of RICHIE.
RIVER m & f English (Modern)
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
ROB m English, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT.
ROBBIE m & f English
Diminutive of ROBERT or ROBERTA.
ROBBY m English
Diminutive of ROBERT.
ROBENA f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ROBIN.
ROBERT m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROBERTA f English, Italian, Spanish
Feminine form of ROBERT.
ROBIN m & f English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROBINA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of ROBIN. It originated in Scotland in the 17th century.
ROBYN f English
Feminine variant of ROBIN.
ROBYNNE f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ROBIN.
ROCHELLE f English
From the name of the French city La Rochelle, meaning "little rock". It first became commonly used as a given name in America in the 1930s, probably due to the fame of actress Rochelle Hudson (1914-1972) and because of the similarity to the name Rachel.
ROCKY m English
Diminutive of ROCCO and other names beginning with a similar sound, or else a nickname referring to a tough person. This is the name of a boxer played by Sylvester Stallone in the movie 'Rocky' (1976) and its five sequels.
ROD m English
Short form of RODERICK or RODNEY.
RODDY m English, Scottish
Diminutive of RODERICK or RODNEY.
RODERICK m English, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous power" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "power". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's poem 'The Vision of Don Roderick' (1811).
RODGE m English
Short form of RODGER.
RODGER m English
Variant of ROGER.
RODNEY m English
From a surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is a Germanic given name meaning "fame"). It was first used as a given name in honour of the British admiral Lord Rodney (1719-1792).
ROGER m English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
ROLAND m English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROLF m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
ROLLAND m English
Variant of ROLAND.
ROLLO m English
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of ROLF. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
ROLY m English
Diminutive of ROLAND.
ROMAINE f French, English
French feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMEY f English (Rare)
Diminutive of ROSEMARY.
ROMY f German, English
Diminutive of ROSEMARIE or ROSEMARY.
RON (1) m English
Short form of RONALD.
RONA (1) f English
Variant of RHONA.
RONALD m Scottish, English
Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
RONDA f English
Variant of RHONDA.
RONI (2) f English
Diminutive of VERONICA.
RONNETTE f English (Rare)
Feminine form of RONALD.
RONNIE m & f English
Diminutive of RONALD or VERONICA.
RONNY m English
Diminutive of RONALD.
ROOSEVELT m English
From a Dutch surname meaning "rose field". This name is often given in honour of American presidents Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) or Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
ROS f English
Short form of ROSALIND, ROSAMUND, and other names beginning with Ros.
ROSA (1) f Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSABEL f English (Rare)
Combination of ROSA (1) and the popular name suffix bel. It was created in the 18th century.
ROSALEEN f English (Rare)
Variant of ROSALINE. James Clarence Mangan used it as a translation for RÓISÍN in his poem 'Dark Rosaleen' (1846).
ROSALIE f French, German, Dutch, English
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.
ROSALIN f English (Rare)
Medieval variant of ROSALIND.
ROSALIND f English
Derived from the Germanic elements hros meaning "horse" and lind meaning "soft, tender, flexible". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy 'As You Like It' (1599).
ROSALINE f English
Medieval variant of ROSALIND. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's 'Love's Labour's Lost' (1594) and 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
ROSALYN f English
Variant of ROSALINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ROSAMOND f English
Variant of ROSAMUND, in use since the Middle Ages.
ROSAMUND f English (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.
ROSANNA f Italian, English
Combination of ROSA (1) and ANNA.
ROSANNE f English, Dutch
Combination of ROSE and ANNE (1).
ROSCOE m English
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, itself derived from Old Norse "roebuck" and skógr "wood, forest".
ROSE f English, French
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROSEANN f English
Variant of ROSANNE.
ROSEANNE f English
Variant of ROSANNE.
ROSELYN f English
Variant of ROSALYN.
ROSEMARY f English
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROSIE f English
Diminutive of ROSE.
ROSLYN f English
Variant of ROSALYN.
ROSS m Scottish, English
From a Scottish and English surname that originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir James Clark Ross (1800-1862), an Antarctic explorer.
ROSWELL m English
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "horse spring".
ROSY f English
Diminutive of ROSE.
ROWAN m & f Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROWANNE f English (Rare)
Feminine variant of ROWAN.
ROWENA f English
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wunn "joy, bliss". According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, this was the name of a daughter of the Saxon chief Hengist. Alternatively, Geoffrey may have based it on a Welsh name. It was popularized by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819).