Names with Relationship "newer form"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is newer form.
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GERONIMO   m   History
From Gerónimo, a Spanish form of JEROME. This is the better-known name of the Apache chief Goyathlay (1829-1909). It was given to him by the Mexicans, his enemies.
GIANNA   f   Italian, Greek
Italian short form of GIOVANNA and a modern Greek variant of IOANNA.
GIANNI   m   Italian, Greek
Italian short form of GIOVANNI and a modern Greek variant of IOANNIS.
GIANNIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek variant of Ioannes (see JOHN).
GIDEON   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
GID'ON   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of GIDEON.
GILAD   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of GILEAD.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILLES   m   French
French form of GILES.
GIORGOS   m   Greek
Modern Greek variant of Georgios (see GEORGE).
GLADYS   f   Welsh, English
From the old Welsh name Gwladus, possibly derived from gwlad "country". It has historically been used as a Welsh form of CLAUDIA. This name became popular outside of Wales after it was used in Ouida's novel 'Puck' (1870).
GÖRAN   m   Swedish
Medieval Swedish form of GEORGE.
GØRAN   m   Norwegian
Medieval Norwegian form of GEORGE.
GORONWY   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, he was the lover of Blodeuwedd. He attempted to murder her husband Lleu Llaw Gyffes but was himself killed.
GÖSTA   m   Swedish
Swedish variant of GUSTAV.
GRÁINNE   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Gaelic grán meaning "grain". This was the name of an ancient Irish grain goddess. The name also belonged to the fiancée of Fionn mac Cumhail and the lover of Diarmaid in later Irish legend, and it is often associated with gráidh "love".
GREGORIOS   m   Greek, Late Greek
Greek form of GREGORY.
GUDRUN   f   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
GUNNAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of GÜNTHER). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
GÜNTHER   m   German, Germanic Mythology
From the Germanic name Gundahar, derived from the elements gund "war" and hari "army, warrior". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century Burgundian king. He appears in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', which has him wooing the Icelandic queen Brünhild. He wins her hand in marriage with the help of the hero Siegfried. He ultimately betrays Siegfried, but Siegfried's widow Kriemhild (Günther's sister) takes her revenge upon him.
HADASSAH   f   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
From Hebrew הֲדַס (hadas) meaning "myrtle tree". In the Old Testament this is the Hebrew name of Queen Esther.
HAGEN (1)   m   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic element hagan meaning "enclosure". In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' he is the half-brother of Günther. He killed the hero Siegfried by luring him onto a hunting expedition and then stabbing him with a javelin in his one vulnerable spot.
HAGIT   f   Hebrew
Hebrew form of HAGGITH.
HAMILCAR   m   Ancient Near Eastern (Latinized), History
Means "brother of Melqart" from Phoenician ha "brother" combined with the name of the god MELQART. Hamilcar was a 3rd-century BC Carthaginian general, the father of Hannibal.
HAMMURABI   m   Ancient Near Eastern, History
From the Akkadian name Hammu-rapi, possibly derived from Amorite meaning "uncle is a healer". This was the name of an 18th-century BC king of Babylon who conquered Sumer and Akkad. He is also known for devising a written code of laws.
HANNIBAL   m   Ancient Near Eastern (Latinized), History
Means "grace of Ba'al" from Phoenician hann "grace" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hannibal was the Carthaginian general who threatened Rome during the Second Punic War in the 3rd century BC.
HARIS (2)   m & f   Greek
Modern Greek form of CHARES or CHARIS.
HARIWALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HAROLD.
HAROLD   m   English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HARTMUT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave mind", derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and muot "mind, spirit".
HARTWIG   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and wig "battle".
HARTWIN   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "brave friend" from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and win "friend".
HASDRUBAL   m   Ancient Near Eastern (Latinized), History
Means "Ba'al helps" from Phoenician azru "help" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hasdrubal was a Carthaginian general, the brother of Hannibal.
HECTOR   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.... [more]
HEIDRUN   f   Norse Mythology, German
Derived from Old Norse heiðr meaning "bright, clear" and rún meaning "secret". In Norse mythology this was the name of a goat that would eat the leaves from the tree of life and produce mead in her udder.
HEINRICH   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of HENRY. This was the name of several German kings.
HELENE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HERMAN   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by a 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church. Another famous bearer was Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of 'Moby-Dick'.
HERMES   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Probably from Greek ‘ερμα (herma) meaning "cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker". Hermes was a Greek god associated with speed and good luck, who served as a messenger to Zeus and the other gods. He was also the patron of travellers, writers, athletes, merchants, thieves and orators.... [more]
HERODIAS   f   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of HEROD. This was the name of a member of the Herodian ruling family of Judea, a sister of Herod Agrippa and the wife of Herod Antipas. She appears in the Old Testament, where she contrives to have her husband Antipas imprison and execute John the Baptist.
HERODION   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Diminutive of the Greek name Heroides (see HEROD). This name is mentioned briefly in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament.
HEVEL   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ABEL.
HIAWATHA   m   History, Native American, Iroquois
From the Iroquoian name Haio-went-ha meaning "he who combs". This was the name of a 16th-century Mohawk leader who founded the Iroquois Confederacy. He was later the subject of a fictionalized 1855 poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HILLEL   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew הלל (halal) meaning "praise". This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament as the father of the judge Abdon.
HIRAM   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Probably of Phoenician origin, though it could be from Hebrew meaning "exalted brother". This was the name of a king of Tyre in the Old Testament. As an English given name, Hiram came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where it gained some currency.
HUBERT   m   English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century.
HUMBERT   m   German, French, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
IDUN   f   Norse Mythology
Modern Scandinavian form of IÐUNN.
IEFAN   m   Welsh
Welsh form of JOHN.
IFAN   m   Welsh
Welsh form of JOHN.
IGNATIUS   m   Late Roman
From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.
IGRAINE   f   Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown, from Igerna, the Latinized form of Welsh Eigyr. In Arthurian legend she is the mother of King Arthur by Uther Pendragon and the mother of Morgan le Fay by Gorlois. The Welsh form Eigyr or Eigr was rendered into Latin as Igerna by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth.
ILIAS   m   Greek
Modern Greek transcription of ELIAS.
IMMANUEL   m   German, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Form of EMMANUEL used in most translations of the Old Testament. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher who held that duty was of highest importance.
IOACHIM   m   Judeo-Christian Legend
Latin form of IOAKEIM.
IOANNA   f   Greek, Biblical Greek
Greek form of JOANNA.
IOANNIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek transcription of Ioannes (see JOHN).
IOSEPHUS   m   Late Roman
Latin form of JOSEPH.
IOSIF   m   Russian, Romanian, Greek
Russian, Romanian and Greek form of JOSEPH.
IRA (1)   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "watchful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of King David's priest. As an English Christian given name, Ira began to be used after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where remained moderately common into the 20th century.
IRAKLIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of HERAKLES.
IRO   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of HERO (1).
ISABÈL   f   Occitan
Occitan form of ISABEL.
ISABELLE   f   French, English, German, Dutch
French form of ISABEL.
ISEULT   f   Arthurian Romance
Medieval variant of ISOLDE.
ISOLDE   f   English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".... [more]
ISRAEL   m   Jewish, English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name יִשְׂרָאֵל (Yisra'el) meaning "God contended". In the Old Testament Israel (who was formerly named Jacob; see Genesis 32:28) wrestles with an angel. The ancient and modern states of Israel took their names from him.
ITAI   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of ITHAI.
ITAMAR   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ITHAMAR.
IÐUNN   f   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Probably derived from Old Norse "again" and unna "to love". In Norse mythology Iðunn was the goddess of spring and immortality whose responsibility it was to guard the gods' apples of youth.
IUNIA   f   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Latin form of JUNIA.
IYOV   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of JOB.
JAM   m   Persian Mythology
Persian form of Avestan Yima meaning "twin" (related to Sanskrit Yama). This was the name of a mythological king, more commonly called Jamshid.
JAMSHID   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Yima Kshaeta, which meant "shining JAM". This was the name of a mythological king of Persia. He is known as either Jamshid or Jam, where Jamshid is a combination of his original name and an honourific.
JARED   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יָרֶד (Yared) or יֶרֶד (Yered) meaning "descent". This is the name of a close descendant of Adam in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popularized in the 1960s by the character Jarrod Barkley on the television series 'The Big Valley'.
JARL   m   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "chieftain, nobleman, earl" in Old Norse. In Norse legend Jarl was the son of the god Ríg and the founder of the race of warriors.
JAVIER   m   Spanish
Spanish form of XAVIER.
JEAN (1)   m   French
French form of Jehan, the Old French form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The French philosophers Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) and Jean Paul Sartre (1905-1980) were two well-known bearers of this name. It was also borne by the German-French Dadaist artist Jean Arp (1886-1966).
JEANNE   f   French, English
Modern French form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Joan of Arc is known as Jeanne d'Arc in France.
JEMIMA   f   Biblical, English
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.
JOACHIM   m   French, German, Polish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Contracted form of JEHOIACHIN or JEHOIAKIM. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
JOEL   m   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "YAHWEH is God". Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
JOFFREY   m   French
French variant form of GEOFFREY.
JOHANNE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Medieval French
French, Danish and Norwegian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
JONAH   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.... [more]
JOSIAH   m   Biblical, English
From the Hebrew name יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Yoshiyahu) meaning "YAHWEH supports". In the Old Testament this is the name of a king of Judah famous for his religious reforms. He was killed fighting the Egyptians at Megiddo in the 7th century BC. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
JOSSE   m   French (Rare), Medieval French
French form of Iudocus (see JOYCE).
JUDE (1)   m   English, Biblical
Variant of JUDAS. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
JUDITH   f   English, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "woman from Judea", Judea being an ancient region in Israel. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.... [more]
JÜRGEN   m   Low German
Low German form of GEORGE.
JUTTA   f   German
Probably a medieval Low German form of JUDITH. It might also derive from a Germanic name such as JUDDA.
KAAN   m   Turkish
Variant of KAĞAN.
KALLISTO   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek καλλιστος (kallistos) meaning "most beautiful", a derivative of καλος (kalos) "beautiful". In Greek mythology Kallisto was a nymph who was loved by Zeus. She was changed into a she-bear by Hera, and subsequently became the Great Bear constellation. This was also an ancient Greek personal name.
KAMBIZ   m   Persian
Modern Persian form of CAMBYSES.
KARPOS   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Original Greek form of CARPUS.
KAVEH   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Possibly means "royal" in Avestan. In Persian mythology Kaveh is a blacksmith who leads a rebellion against the evil ruler Zahhak.
KENELM   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
KHORDAD   f   Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of HAURVATAT. This is the name of the third month in the Iranian calendar.
KHURSHID   m & f   Persian, Urdu, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Hvare Khshaeta meaning "shining sun". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a Yazata (or angel) who was associated with the sun.
KINBOROUGH   f   Medieval English
Middle English form of CYNEBURG.
KORALIA   f   Greek, Late Greek
Derived from Ancient Greek κοραλλιον (korallion) meaning "coral" (in Modern Greek κοραλλι). This was the name of an obscure 4th-century saint and martyr from Thrace.
KORINA   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of CORINNA.
KRIEMHILD   f   German (Rare), Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements grim "mask" and hild "battle". Kriemhild was a beautiful heroine in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', where she is the sister of Günther and the wife of Siegfried. After her husband is killed by Hagen with the consent of Günther, Kriemhild tragically exacts her revenge.
KYLLIKKI   f   Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Possibly derived from an old Finnish word meaning "woman". This is the name of a character in the Finnish epic the 'Kalevala'.
KYRIAKOS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Greek form of CYRIACUS.
LAMBERT   m   German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements land "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
LAOGHAIRE   m   Irish
Modern Irish form of LÓEGAIRE.
LAOISE   f   Irish
Possibly a newer form of LUIGSECH. It is also used as an Irish form of Louise.
LEAH   f   English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's sister Rachel. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.
LEONARDO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, History
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is also known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the 'Mona Lisa'. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
LEONIDAS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion" combined with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). Leonidas was a Spartan king of the 5th century BC who sacrificed his life and his army defending the pass of Thermopylae from the Persians. This was also the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr, the father of Origen, from Alexandria.
LEVI   m   Hebrew, English, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. In the New Testament this is another name for the apostle Matthew. As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
LIGEIA   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λιγυς (ligys) meaning "clear-voiced, shrill, whistling". This was the name of one of the Sirens in Greek legend. It was also used by Edgar Allan Poe in his story 'Ligeia' (1838).
LINDA   f   English, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LINOS   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Greek form of LINUS.
LIUPOLD   m   Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LEOPOLD.
LÓEGAIRE   m   Irish Mythology, Ancient Irish
Means "calf herder", derived from Irish loagh "calf". In Irish mythology Lóegaire Búadach was an Ulster warrior. He saved the life of the poet Áed, but died in the process. This was also the name of several Irish high kings.
LOIS (1)   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly derived from Greek λωιων (loion) meaning "more desirable" or "better". Lois is mentioned in the New Testament as the mother of Eunice and the grandmother of Timothy. As an English name, it came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In fiction, this is the name of the girlfriend of the comic book hero Superman.
LOKE   m   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of LOKI.
LOTHAR   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Chlodochar meaning "famous army", derived from the elements hlud "famous" and hari "army". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish king, the son of Louis I, who ruled the region called Lorraine. It was also borne by medieval kings of France, Italy and the Holy Roman Empire.
  m   Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of LUGH.
LUDOLF   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hludwolf which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wolf "wolf".
LUGH   m   Irish Mythology
Probably an Irish form of LUGUS. In Irish mythology Lugh was a divine hero who led the Tuatha De Danann against the Fomorians who were led by his grandfather Balor. Lugh killed Balor by shooting a stone into his giant eye.
LUGHAIDH   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Derived from the name of the Irish god LUGH. This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including the king Lughaidh mac Con.
LUÍSEACH   f   Irish
Modern form of LUIGSECH.
LUITGARD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Leutgard which was derived from the elements leud "people" and gard "enclosure". This was the name of a 13th-century Flemish nun, the patron saint of easy deliveries.
LUNED   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Variant of ELUNED. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is a servant of the Lady of the Fountain who rescues the knight Owain.
LYDIA   f   English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
MABON   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh mab meaning "son". This was the name of an old Celtic god.
MADHAVA   m   Sanskrit, Hinduism
Means "vernal, of the springtime" in Sanskrit. This is an epithet of several Hindu gods. It was also the name of a 14th-century Hindu scholar.
MALACHI   m   Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhiy) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
MALCOLM   m   Scottish, English
From Scottish Máel Coluim which means "disciple of Saint COLUMBA". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Macbeth' (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.
MAOLSHEACHLANN   m   Irish
Modern Irish form of MÁEL SECHLAINN.
MARCUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was probably derived from the name of the Roman god MARS. This was among the most popular of the Roman praenomina. Famous bearers include Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARKOS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Greek form of Marcus (see MARK).
MARTHA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.... [more]
MATHÚIN   m   Irish
Modern Irish form of MATHGHAMHAIN.
MATTHIAS   m   Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
MATTITYAHU   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of MATTHEW.
MÉABH   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Variant of MEDB.
MEADHBH   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Variant of MEDB.
MEHMET   m   Turkish
Turkish form of MUHAMMAD. This name was borne sultans of the Ottoman Empire (with the older form Mehmed).
MEHR   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of MITHRA.
MEHRDAD   m   Persian
Modern Persian form of MITHRIDATES.
MEINRAD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "mighty, strong" and rad "counsel". Saint Meinrad was a 9th-century hermit who founded the Benedictine abbey at Einsiedeln in Switzerland.
MELECH   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "king" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Micah (not the prophet).
MÉLISANDE   f   French
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play 'Pelléas et Mélisande' (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).
MELISSA   f   English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "bee" in Greek. This was the name of a nymph that cared for young Zeus in Greek mythology. It is also the name of the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina in Ludovico Ariosto's poem 'Orlando Furioso' (1516). As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
MELPOMENI   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of MELPOMENE.
MENACHEM   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of MENAHEM.
MENASHE   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of MANASSEH.
MERAV   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of MERAB (1).
MEREDYDD   m   Welsh
Welsh form of MEREDITH.
MERLIN   m   Arthurian Romance, English
Form of the Welsh name Myrddin (meaning "sea fortress") used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 12th-century Arthurian tales. Writing in Latin, he likely chose the form Merlinus over Merdinus in order to prevent associations with French merde "excrement".... [more]
MERVYN   m   Welsh, English
From the Welsh name Merfyn, which possibly meant "marrow famous". This was the name of a 9th-century Welsh king, Merfyn Frych.
MESHULLAM   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means either "paid for" or "friend" in Hebrew. This was the name of many characters in the Old Testament.
MESUT   m   Turkish
Turkish form of MAS'UD.
MICAH   m   Biblical, English
Contracted form of MICAIAH. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
MICHAIL   m   Greek, Russian
Modern Greek form of MICHAEL. It is also a variant transcription of Russian MIKHAIL.
MICHAL (2)   f   Biblical, Hebrew
Possibly means "brook" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Saul. She was married to David, but after David fled from Saul he remarried her to someone else. Later, when David became king, he ordered her returned to him.
MICHALIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of MICHAEL.
MICHEL   m   French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MICHELANGELO   m   Italian, History
From Italian, meaning "MICHAEL angel", referring to the archangel Michael. The Renaissance painter and sculptor Michelangelo Buonarroti, from Florence, was the man who created such great works of art as the statue of David and the mural on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. This name was also borne by the Baroque artist Michelangelo Merisi, better known as Caravaggio.
MIKHA'EL   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of MICHAEL.
MILBURGA   f   History
Derived from the Old English elements milde "gentle" and burg "fortress". Saint Milburga, the sister of Saint Mildred, was a daughter of a 7th-century Mercian king. She was supposedly in possession of magical powers.
MILDRED   f   English
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MIRIAM   f   Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.
MNASON   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Possibly means "reminding" in Greek. In Acts in the New Testament Paul stays in Jerusalem with a man named Mnason, a Jew who was originally from Cyprus.
MORDAD   f   Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of AMORDAD. This is the name of the fifth month in the Iranian calendar.
MORDECAI   m   Biblical, Hebrew
Means "servant of MARDUK" in Persian. In the Old Testament Mordecai is the cousin and foster father of Esther. He thwarted a plot to kill the Persian king, though he made an enemy of the king's chief advisor Haman.
MORDECHAI   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of MORDECAI.
MORDIKAI   m   English (Rare)
Variant of MORDECAI.
MORGAINE   f   Arthurian Romance
Variant of MORGAN (2), from a French form.
MORGAN (2)   f   Arthurian Romance
Modern form of Morgen, which was used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century for the Arthurian sorceress Morgan le Fay, who was unnamed in earlier stories. Geoffrey probably did not derive it from the Welsh masculine name Morgan, which would have been spelled Morcant in his time. He may have based it on the Irish name MUIRGEN.
MORGEN   f   Arthurian Romance
Earlier form of MORGAN (2).
MORIAH   f   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English (Modern)
Possibly means "seen by YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This is a place name in the Old Testament, both the land where Abraham is to sacrifice Isaac and the mountain upon which Solomon builds the temple. They may be the same place. Since the 1980s it has occasionally been used as a feminine given name in America.
MORRIGAN   f   Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
MORRIS   m   English, Medieval English
Usual medieval form of MAURICE.
MOSES   m   English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh) which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology (see Exodus 2:10). The biblical Moses was drawn out of the Nile by the pharaoh's daughter and adopted into the royal family, at a time when the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. With his brother Aaron he demanded the pharaoh release the Israelites, which was only done after God sent ten plagues upon Egypt. Moses led the people across the Red Sea and to Mount Sinai, where he received the Ten Commandments from God. After 40 years of wandering in the desert the people reached Canaan, the Promised Land, but Moses died just before entering it.... [more]
MOSHE   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of MOSES.
MUIREADHACH   m   Irish, Scottish
Modern form of MUIREDACH.
MUIRENN   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Either derived from Gaelic muir "sea" and fionn "fair, white", or else a variant of MUIRNE.
MUIRGEN   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "born of the sea" in Gaelic. In Irish legend this was the name of a woman (originally named Líban) who was transformed into a mermaid. After 300 years she was brought to shore, baptized, and transformed back into a woman.
MUIRGHEAL   f   Irish
Modern form of MUIRGEL.
MUIRÍN   f   Irish
Modern form of MUIRGEN.
NAAMAH   f   Biblical, Hebrew
Means "pleasant" in Hebrew. This name is borne in the Old Testament by both a daughter of Lamech and a wife of Solomon. Some later Jewish texts give Naamah as the name of Noah's wife, even though she is not named in the Old Testament.
NACHUM   m   Biblical Hebrew, Hebrew
Hebrew form of NAHUM.
NADAV   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of NADAB.
NAHID   f   Persian
Modern Persian form of ANAHITA. This is also the Persian name for the planet Venus.
NAOISE   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown, presumably of Gaelic origin. In Irish legend he was the young man who eloped with Deirdre, the beloved of Conchobhar the king of Ulster. Conchobhar eventually succeeded in having Naoise murdered, which caused Deirdre to die of grief.
NAOMI (1)   f   English, Hebrew, Biblical
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara (see Ruth 1:20).... [more]
NARSEH   m   Ancient Persian
Persian form of NAIRYOSANGHA.
NATAN   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of NATHAN.
NATHAN   m   English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.... [more]
NATHANIEL   m   English, Biblical
Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.
NEASA   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Meaning uncertain. In Irish legend she was the mother of Conchobhar, king of Ulster. According to some versions of the legend she was originally named Assa meaning "gentle", but was renamed Ni-assa "not gentle" after she sought to avenge the murders of her foster fathers.
NEFELI   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of NEPHELE.
NEOFYTOS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of NEOPHYTOS.
NEREUS   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Derived from Greek νηρος (neros) meaning "water". In Greek myth this was the name of a god of the sea, the father of the Nereids. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament, belonging to a Christian in Rome. This was also the name of a Roman saint of the 1st century, a member of the army, who was martyred with his companion Achilleus because they refused to execute Christians.
NESSA (3)   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of NEASA.
NIAMH   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.
NIGEL   m   English
From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of NEIL. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Fortunes of Nigel' (1822).
NIKE   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "victory" in Greek. Nike was the Greek goddess of victory.
NIKODEMOS   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek form of NICODEMUS.
NIKOLAOS   m   Ancient Greek, Greek
Original Greek form of NICHOLAS.
NINIAN   m   Scottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic
Meaning unknown. It appears in a Latinized form Niniavus, which could be from the Welsh name NYNNIAW. This was the name of a 5th-century British saint who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He is known as the Apostle to the Picts.
NINO (2)   f   Ancient Near Eastern (Hellenized), Georgian
Meaning unknown, possibly related to the masculine name NINOS. Saint Nino (sometimes called Nina) was a woman from Asia Minor who introduced Christianity to Georgia in the 4th century.
NJORD   m   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Old Norse Njörðr, which was possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ner meaning "strong, vigourous". Njord was the Norse god of the sea, sailing, fishing and fertility. With his children Freyr and Freya he was a member of the Vanir.
NOA (1)   f   Hebrew, Biblical
Hebrew form of NOAH (2).
NOACH   m   Hebrew, Dutch, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew and Dutch form of NOAH (1).
NOAH (1)   m   English, Biblical
Derived from the Hebrew name נֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort". According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the great Flood. After the Flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. He was the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.... [more]
NOGAH   m & f   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "brightness" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of King David in the Old Testament. In modern times it is sometimes used as a feminine name.
NUNO   m   Portuguese, Medieval Portuguese
Medieval Portuguese and Spanish name, possibly from Latin nonus "ninth" or nunnus "grandfather". Saint Nuno was a 14th-century Portuguese general who defeated a Castilian invasion.
ODA   f   German, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Odo (see OTTO).
ODEN   m   Norse Mythology
Swedish form of ODIN.
ODIN   m   Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn which was derived from óðr "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. In Norse mythology Odin was the highest of the gods, presiding over art, war, wisdom and death. He resided in Valhalla, where warriors went after they were slain.
ODO   m   Ancient Germanic
Variant of Audo (see OTTO).
ODOACER   m   Ancient Germanic
Variant of ODOVACAR. The Gothic leader Odovacar is frequently called by this name.
ODOVACAR   m   Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audovacar meaning "wealthy and vigilant", derived from the elements aud "wealth" and wacar "vigilant". Odovacar, also called Odoacer, was a 5th-century Gothic leader who overthrew the last Western Roman emperor and became the first barbarian king of Italy.
ÓENGUS   m   Ancient Irish, Irish Mythology
Old Irish form of AONGHUS.
OFIR   m & f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of OPHIR. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name.
OFRA   m & f   Hebrew
Hebrew form of OPHRAH. Originally it was a masculine name, but it is now used for females too.
OISÍN   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "little deer", derived from Irish os "deer" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend Oisín was a warrior hero and a poet, the son of Fionn mac Cumhail.
OLIVIER   m   French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
OLYMPIA   f   Greek, Slovak
Feminine form of OLYMPOS.
OMIROS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of HOMER.
OMRI   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Possibly means "life" or "servant" in Hebrew (or a related Semitic language). This was the name of a 9th-century BC military commander who became king of Israel. He appears in the Old Testament, where he is denounced as being wicked.
ONESIMOS   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Original Greek form of ONESIMUS.
ONESIPHOROS   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Original Greek form of ONESIPHORUS.
ORMAZD   m   Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of AHURA MAZDA.
ORPHA   f   Biblical, English
Variant of ORPAH used in some translations of the Bible.
ORVAR   m   Swedish, Norse Mythology
Means "arrow" in Old Norse. Orvar Odd is a legendary Norse hero who is the subject of a 13th-century Icelandic saga.
OSBERT   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright". After the Norman conquest, this Old English name was merged with its Norman cognate. It was rare in the Middle Ages, and eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OSBORN   m   English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjörn used in England, and after the Norman conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OSMOND   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans. Saint Osmund was an 11th-century Norman nobleman who became an English bishop. Though it eventually became rare, it was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OSWIN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OTTO   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
OVADIA   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of OBADIAH.
OVED   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of OBED.
OWAIN   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though it might be derived from Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology. In Arthurian legend Owain (also called Yvain in French sources) was one of the Knights of the Round Table, the son of King Urien and husband of the Lady of the Fountain. His character was based on that of Owain ap Urien, a 6th-century Welsh prince who fought against the Angles. This name was also borne by Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century leader of Welsh resistance against English rule.
OWEN (1)   m   Welsh, English
Modern form of OWAIN.
PARASKEVAS   m   Greek, Late Greek
Masculine form of PARASKEVE.
PARASKEVI   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of PARASKEVE.
PAUL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
PAULUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Latin form of PAUL.
PAVLOS   m   Greek
Greek form of PAUL.
PELAGIA   f   Ancient Greek, Greek, Polish
Feminine form of PELAGIUS. This was the name of a few early saints, including a young 4th-century martyr who threw herself from a rooftop in Antioch rather than lose her virginity.
PELEG   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, Hebrew
Means "division, channel" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the son of Eber.
PÉPIN   m   History
Frankish name of unknown meaning. It possibly means "awe-inspiring" from Frankish bib- "to tremble". This was the name of three majordomos of Austrasia including Pépin III the Short, who became the first Carolingian king of the Franks. He was the father of Charlemagne.
PEREDUR   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Possibly means "hard spears" in Welsh. This was the name of several figures from Welsh mythology. It was later used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Arthurian tales. The character of Percival was probably based on him.
PERETZ   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of PEREZ.
PERIKLIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of PERICLES.
PERSEFONI   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of PERSEPHONE.
PETROS   m   Greek, Armenian, Biblical Greek
Greek and Armenian form of PETER.
PHARAMOND   m   Literature, French (Rare)
French form of FARAMUND used by Shakespeare in 'Henry V' (1599).
PHEBE   f   English, Biblical
Variant of PHOEBE used in some translations of the New Testament.
PHOEBE   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHOTIOS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek φως (phos) meaning "light" (genitive φωτος (photos)).
PIERRE   m   French, Swedish
French form of PETER. This name was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and by Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
PINCHAS   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of PHINEHAS.
PLATON   m   Ancient Greek, Greek, Russian
Greek form of PLATO.
POCAHONTAS   f   History, Native American, Algonquin
Means "she is playful" in Algonquin. This was the name of a young Algonquin woman, daughter of a powerful chief, who married a white colonist.
POLYXENI   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of POLYXENA.
PONTIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman family name. The family had Samnite roots so the name probably originated from the Oscan language, likely meaning "fifth" (a cognate of Latin Quintus). Alternatively, it could be derived from the name of the ancient province of Pontus in Asia Minor, itself probably from Greek ποντος (pontos) "sea". A notable bearer of this name was Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Judea who appears in the New Testament.
PREBEN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Modern Danish form of the name Pridbjørn, which was a medieval Scandinavian form of the Slavic (Wendish) name Pridbor, which was derived from Slavic prid "first" and borti "battle". It was imported into Danish via the medieval Putbus family, who were Slavic nobles from Rügen in Pomerania.
PRISCA   f   Biblical, Dutch, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Feminine form of Priscus, a Roman family name which meant "ancient" in Latin. This name appears in the epistles in the New Testament, referring to Priscilla the wife of Aquila.
PRISCILLA   f   English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).
PROKOPIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of PROKOPIOS.
PRYDERI   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "care" in Welsh. According to Welsh legend this was the name of the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon. A central character in the Mabinogion, he succeeds his father as king of Dyfed, but is ultimately killed in single combat with Gwydion.
QUIRINUS   m   Roman Mythology, Late Roman
Possibly derived from the Sabine word quiris meaning "spear". Quirinus was a Sabine and Roman god who was later identified with Mars. The name was also borne by several early saints.
RACHEL   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin. She was the younger sister of Jacob's first wife Leah.... [more]
RAFE   m   English
Variant of RALPH. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
RAIMUND   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYMOND.
RAINARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Variant of REYNARD.
RAINER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYNER.
RALPH   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
RASHN   m   Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Rashnu meaning "justice". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a Yazata who judged the souls of the dead.
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