Masculine Names

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VIOREL m Romanian
Derived from viorea, the Romanian word for the alpine squill flower (species Scilla bifolia) or the sweet violet flower (species Viola odorata). It is derived from Latin viola "violet".
VIPIN m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam
Means "forest" in Sanskrit.
VIPUL m Indian, Marathi, Gujarati, Hindi
Means "large, extensive, plenty" in Sanskrit.
VIRAJ m Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Modern form of VIRAJA.
VIRAJA m Hinduism
Means "ruling, sovereign" in Sanskrit. This is the name of an offspring of Brahma in Hindu belief.
VIRGIL m English, Romanian
From the Roman family name Vergilius, which is of unknown meaning. This name was borne by the 1st-century BC Roman poet Publius Vergilius Maro, commonly called Virgil, who was the writer of the Aeneid. Due to him, Virgil has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
VIRGILIJUS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of VIRGIL.
VIRGÍLIO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of VIRGIL.
VIRGILIO m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of VIRGIL.
VIRGILIU m Romanian
Romanian variant of VIRGIL.
VIRGILIUS m Late Roman
Medieval Latin form of VERGILIUS, altered by association with Latin virgo "maiden" or virga "wand".
VIRIATO m Portuguese
From the Latin name Viriathus or Viriatus, which was derived from viriae "bracelets" (of Celtic origin). Viriathus was a leader of the Lusitani (a tribe of Portugal) who rebelled against Roman rule in the 2nd century BC.
VIŠESLAV m Serbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV).
VISHAL m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Bengali
Means "wide, broad, spacious" in Sanskrit.
VISHNU m Hinduism, Indian, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Hindi, Marathi
Probably means "all-pervasive" in Sanskrit. The Hindu god Vishnu is the protector and preserver of the universe, usually depicted as four-armed and blue-skinned. By some Hindus he is regarded as the supreme god.
VISSARION m Russian (Archaic), Greek
Russian form and Modern Greek transcription of BESSARION.
VISSENTE m Sardinian
Sardinian form of VINCENT.
VISVALDAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of VISVALDIS.
VISVALDIS m Latvian
Latvian name derived from the Baltic elements vis "all" and vald "rule". It is thus a cognate of the Slavic VSEVOLOD.
VÍT m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of VITUS or WIDO.
VITAL m French, Belarusian
French and Belarusian form of Vitalis (see VITALE).
VITALE m Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Vitalis, which was derived from Latin vitalis meaning "of life, vital". Vitalis was the name of several early saints and martyrs.
VITALI m Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian Виталий or Ukrainian Віталій (see VITALIY).
VITĀLIJS m Latvian
Latvian form of Vitalis (see VITALE).
VITALIJUS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of Vitalis (see VITALE).
VITALIK m Russian, Ukrainian
Diminutive of VITALIY.
VITALIS m Late Roman
Latin form of VITALE.
VITALIY m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Vitalis (see VITALE).
VITALY m Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian Виталий or Ukrainian Віталій (see VITALIY).
VÍTEK m Czech
Diminutive of VÍT.
VÍTĚZSLAV m Czech
Possibly from the Slavic elements vit "master, lord" and slava "glory".
VÍÐARR m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of VIDAR.
VÍÐIR m Icelandic
Icelandic form of VIDE.
VITILSAV m Medieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of VÍTĚZSLAV.
VITO m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of VITUS.
VITOLD m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of WITOLD.
VITOMIR m Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vit "master, lord" and miru "peace, world".
VÍTOR m Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of VICTOR.
VITORINO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of VICTORINUS.
VITTORE m Italian
Italian form of VICTOR.
VITTORINO m Italian
Italian form of VICTORINUS.
VITTORIO m Italian
Italian form of VICTORIUS.
VITUS m Ancient Roman
Roman name that was derived from Latin vita "life". Saint Vitus was a child martyred in Sicily in the early 4th century. From an early date this name was confused with the Germanic name Wido.
VITYA m Russian
Diminutive of VIKTOR.
VIVEK m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Bengali
Means "wisdom, distinction, discrimination" in Sanskrit.
VIVIAN m & f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Latin name Vivianus, which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
VIVIANUS m Late Roman
Latin form of VIVIAN.
VIVIEN (1) m French
French form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN).
VJEKO m Croatian
Short form of VJEKOSLAV.
VJEKOSLAV m Croatian
Derived from the Slavic elements vyeku "age" and slava "glory".
VLAD m Romanian, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Old short form of VLADISLAV and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule". Vlad Dracula, a 15th-century prince of Wallachia, was Bram Stoker's inspiration for the name of his vampire, Count Dracula.
VLADAN m Serbian, Czech, Slovak
Short form of Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule".
VLADAS m Lithuanian
Short form of VLADIMIRAS.
VLADIK m Russian
Diminutive of VLADISLAV.
VLADILEN m Russian
Contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the name of the founder of the former Soviet state (see VLADIMIR and LENIN).
VLADIMER m Georgian
Georgian form of VLADIMIR.
VLADIMERU m Medieval Slavic
Church Slavic form of VLADIMIR.
VLADIMÍR m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of VLADIMIR.
VLADIMIR m Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
VLADIMIRAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of VLADIMIR.
VLADIMIRS m Latvian
Latvian form of VLADIMIR.
VLADISLAV m Russian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
VLADLEN m Russian
Contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the name of the founder of the former Soviet state (see VLADIMIR and LENIN).
VLADO m Croatian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Short form of VLADIMIR and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule".
VLADYSLAV m Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of VLADISLAV.
VLAHO m Croatian
Croatian form of Blasius (see BLAISE).
VLAS m Russian
Russian form of BLAISE.
VLASI m Russian (Rare)
Alternate transcription of Russian Власий (see VLASIY).
VLASIS m Greek
Greek form of BLAISE.
VLASIY m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of BLAISE.
VLASSIS m Greek
Greek form of BLAISE.
VLASTIMIL m Czech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti "rule, sovereignty" and milu "gracious, dear". In modern Czech vlast means "homeland" (a descendant word of vlasti).
VLASTIMIR m Serbian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti meaning "rule, sovereignty" and miru meaning "peace, world".
VLASTISLAV m Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti meaning "rule, sovereignty" and slava meaning "glory". In modern Czech vlast means "homeland" (a descendant word of vlasti).
VOHU MANAH m Persian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of BAHMAN.
VOISLAV m Medieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of VOJISLAV.
VOITSEKH m Medieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of WOJCIECH.
VOITTO m Finnish
Means "victory" in Finnish.
VOJISLAV m Serbian
Derived from the Slavic elements voji "warrior, soldier" and slava "glory, fame".
VOJTA m Czech
Diminutive of VOJTĚCH.
VOJTĚCH m Czech
Czech form of WOJCIECH.
VOJTECH m Slovak
Slovak form of WOJCIECH.
VOLDEMARAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian variant of WALDEMAR.
VOLDEMĀRS m Latvian
Latvian cognate of WALDEMAR.
VOLKAN m Turkish
Means "volcano" in Turkish.
VOLKER m German
Derived from the Germanic element fulc "people" combined with hari "army".
VOLODIMERU m Medieval Slavic
Old East Slavic form of VLADIMIR.
VOLODISLAVU m Medieval Slavic
Old East Slavic form of VLADISLAV.
VOLODYA m Russian
Diminutive of VLADIMIR.
VOLODYMYR m Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of VLADIMIR.
VOLOS m Slavic Mythology
Derived from Slavic volu meaning "ox". Volos was the Slavic god of cattle, also associated with the earth, wealth, the underworld, and poetry.
VÖLUND m Norse Mythology
Scandinavian form of WIELAND.
VÖLUNDR m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of WIELAND.
VOLYA m Russian (Rare)
Means "will, freedom" in Russian.
VORTIGERN m History
English form of GWRTHEYRN.
VOSGI f & m Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Ոսկի (see VOSKI).
VOSKI f & m Armenian
Means "gold" in Armenian.
VOVA m Russian
Diminutive of VLADIMIR.
VRAGI m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse byname possibly meaning "mooring post".
VRATISLAV m Czech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vratiti "to return" and slava "glory". This was the name of two dukes of Bohemia. The city of Wrocław in Poland is named after the first.
VSEVOLOD m Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements visi "all" and vladeti "rule". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev.
VUGAR m Azerbaijani
Alternate transcription of Azerbaijani VÜQAR.
VUK m Serbian
Means "wolf" in Serbian.
VUKAŠIN m Serbian
Derived from Serbian vuk meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian ruler.
VULCAN m Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Vulcanus, possibly related to fulgere meaning "to flash", but more likely of pre-Latin origin. In Roman mythology Vulcan was the god of fire. He was later equated with the Greek god Hephaestus.
VULFERAM m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WOLFRAM.
VULFGANG m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WOLFGANG.
VÜQAR m Azerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of WAQAR.
VURAL m Turkish
Possibly from Turkish vur meaning "strike, hit".
VÜSAL m Azerbaijani
Means "meeting, joining" in Azerbaijani.
VYACHESLAV m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of VÁCLAV.
VYGANTAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of WIGAND.
VYTAUTAS m Lithuanian
From the Baltic element vyti- "chase, drive away" or vyd- "see" combined with tauta "people, nation". This was the name of a 15th-century Grand Duke of Lithuania, revered as a national hero in that country.
WACŁAW m Polish
Polish form of VÁCLAV.
WADE m English
From an English surname, either WADE (1) or WADE (2).
WADUD m Arabic
Means "lover, affectionate" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الودود (al-Wadud) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
WAEL m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic وائل (see WAIL).
WAFAI m Arabic
Means "loyalty" in Arabic.
WAFI m Arabic
Means "trustworthy, reliable, loyal, perfect" in Arabic.
WAFULA m Eastern African, Luhya
Means "born during the rainy season", from Luhya ifula meaning "rainy season".
WAHEED m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic وحيد (see WAHID).
WAHID m Arabic
Means "peerless, unique" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الوحيد (al-Wahid) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
WAHUNSENACAWH m Indigenous American, Powhatan
Meaning unknown. This name was borne by a 17th-century chief of the Powhatan people. He was also known as Powhatan, as a result of confusion between his name and his birthplace.
WAHYU m Indonesian
Means "revelation" in Indonesian.
WAIL m Arabic
Possibly means "refuge, shelter" in Arabic.
WALAHFRID m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements walha "stranger" and frid "peace".
WALCHELIN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of VAUQUELIN.
WALDEK m Polish
Polish diminutive of WALDEMAR.
WALDEMAR m German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Germanic derivative of the Slavic name VLADIMIR (or perhaps a cognate composed of the Germanic elements wald "rule" and mari "famous"). It was introduced into Scandinavia by the 12th-century Danish king Waldemar (or Valdemar) who was named after a royal ancestor of his Ukrainian mother.
WALDHAR m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WALTER.
WALDO m English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element wald meaning "rule". In the Middle Ages this name became the basis for a surname. Its present use in the English-speaking world is usually in honour of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism. He was (probably) named after the 12th-century Christian radical Peter Waldo, who was from Lyons in France. Though Waldo and his followers, called the Waldensians, were declared heretics at the time, they were later admired by Protestants.
WALDOBERT m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements wald "rule" and beraht "bright". This was the name of a 7th-century French saint (called Valbert or Gaubert in French).
WALDOMAR m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WALDEMAR.
WALENTY m Polish
Polish form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
WALERIAN m Polish
Polish form of Valerianus (see VALERIAN).
WALERY m Polish
Polish form of VALERIUS.
WALHBERCT m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements walha "stranger" and beraht "bright".
WALHERICH m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of VALÉRY.
WALID m Arabic
Means "newborn", derived from Arabic ولد (walada) meaning "to give birth". This was the name of the Umayyad caliph who conquered Spain in the 8th century.
WALKER m English
From an English surname that referred to the medieval occupational of a walker, also known as a fuller. Walkers would tread on wet, unprocessed wool in order to clean and thicken it. The word ultimately derives from Old English wealcan "to walk".
WALLACE m English, Scottish
From a Scottish and English surname that originally meant "Welsh" or "foreigner" in Norman French. It was first used as a given name in honour of Sir William Wallace, a Scottish hero who led the fight against English invasion in the 13th century.
WALLIS m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of WALLACE. Wallis Simpson (1895-1986) was the divorced woman whom Edward VIII married, which forced him to abdicate the British throne.
WALLY m English
Diminutive of WALTER or WALLACE.
WALT m English
Short form of WALTER. A famous bearer was the American animator and filmmaker Walt Disney (1901-1966).
WÁLTER m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese variant form of WALTER, more common in South America than Europe. It is often written without the diacritic.
WALTER m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618). It was also borne by Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote Ivanhoe and other notable works.
WALTHER m German, Ancient Germanic
German variant of WALTER. This name was borne by the 13th-century German poet Walther von der Vogelweide.
WALTON m English
From a surname that was originally taken from various Old English place names meaning "stream town", "wood town", or "wall town".
WAMALWA m Eastern African, Luhya
Means "born during the brewing season" in Luhya.
WAMAN m Indigenous American, Quechua
Means "eagle, falcon" in Quechua.
WANANGWA m & f Southern African, Tumbuka
Means "freedom" in Tumbuka.
WANDAL m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WENDEL.
WANDALIN m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WENDELIN.
WANGCHUK m & f Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "mighty" in Tibetan, from དབང (dbang) meaning "power" and ཕྱུག (phyug) meaning "wealthy, possessing". This is the Tibetan name for the god Shiva.
WANJALA m Eastern African, Luhya
Means "born during famine", from Luhya injala meaning "hunger, famine".
WANYONYI m Eastern African, Luhya
Means "born during the weeding season", from Luhya enyonyi meaning "weeds".
WAPASHA m Indigenous American, Sioux
Means "red leaf" in Dakota. This was the name of several Dakota chiefs.
WAQAR m Arabic
Means "majesty, dignity" in Arabic.
WARAMUNT m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of VEREMUND.
WARCISŁAW m Polish (Archaic)
Polish form of VRATISLAV. This was the name of several dukes of Pomerania.
WARD (1) m English
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
WARD (2) m Dutch
Short form of EDUARD.
WARDELL m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "watch hill" in Old English.
WARIN m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element warin meaning "guard, protect".
WARINHARI m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WERNER.
WARNER m English
From a Norman surname that was derived from the given name WERNER.
WARREN m English
From an English surname that was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy. This name was borne by the American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
WARRICK m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of WARWICK.
WARWICK m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from the name of a town in England, itself from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wíc "settlement".
WASHINGTON m English
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English town, itself meaning "settlement belonging to WASSA's people". The given name is usually given in honour of George Washington (1732-1799), commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and the first president of the United States.
WASI m Arabic
Means "broad-minded, liberal, learned" in Arabic.
WASIM m Arabic
Means "handsome" in Arabic.
WASSILY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see VASILIY).
WASSIM m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic وسيم (see WASIM).
WASSWA m Eastern African, Ganda
Means "first of twins" in Luganda.
WASYL m Ukrainian (Polonized)
Polonized form of VASYL.
WAT m English
Medieval short form of WALTER.
WATE m Frisian
Possibly a Frisian short form of WALTER.
WATSE m Frisian
Diminutive of WATE.
WATSON m English
From an English surname meaning "son of WAT". A famous fictional bearer of the surname was Dr. Watson, the assistant to Sherlock Holmes in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887.
WATTANA f & m Thai
Means "development" in Thai.
WAWATAM m Indigenous American, Ojibwe
Means "little goose" in Ojibwe. This was the name of an 18th-century chief of the Ottawa people.
WAWRZYNIEC m Polish
Polish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
WAYAN m & f Balinese
From Balinese wayah meaning "old, mature", ultimately from Sanskrit वयस् (vayas) meaning "energy, strength, age". This name is traditionally given to the first-born child.
WAYLAND m English
From Weland, the Old English cognate of WIELAND.
WAYLON m English
Variant of WAYLAND. This name was popularized by country music singer Waylon Jennings (1937-2002), who was originally named Wayland.
WAYNA m Indigenous American, Quechua
Means "young" in Quechua.
WAYNE m English
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
WAYRA m Indigenous American, Quechua
Means "wind" in Quechua.
WAZO m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element wad meaning "to go" or warin meaning "guard, protect".
WEALDMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
WEALHMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wealh "foreigner, Celt" and mær "famous".
WEBSTER m English
From an occupational surname meaning "weaver", derived from Old English webba.
WEI m & f Chinese
From Chinese (wēi) meaning "power, pomp", (wēi) meaning "high, lofty, towering" or (wěi) meaning "great, robust, extraordinary". As a feminine name it can come from (wēi) meaning "small" or (wēi) meaning "fern". This name can be formed by other Chinese characters besides those shown here.
WEKESA m Eastern African, Luhya
Means "born during harvest" in Luhya.
WELDON m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "hill near a spring" in Old English.
WEMBA m Anglo-Saxon (Rare)
Byname derived from Old English wamb meaning "belly".
WEN m & f Chinese
From Chinese (wén) meaning "literature, culture, writing", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
WENCESLAS m History
Variant of WENCESLAUS. This is the usual spelling of Saint Václav's name in English.
WENCESLAUS m Medieval Czech (Latinized), History
Medieval Latinized form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV). The spelling may have been influenced by the Czech word věnec meaning "wreath, crown".
WENDEL m Dutch (Rare), German (Rare)
Old short form of Germanic names beginning with the element wandal meaning "a Vandal". The Vandals were a Germanic tribe who invaded Spain and North Africa in the 5th century. Their tribal name, which may mean "wanderer", was later applied to other groups such as the Wends, a Slavic people living between the Elbe and the Oder.
WENDELIN m German, Ancient Germanic
Old diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element wandal (see WENDEL). Saint Wendelin was a 6th-century hermit of Trier in Germany.
WENDELL m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name WENDEL.
WENZEL m German
Medieval German form of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Wenceslaus.
WENZESLAUS m German (Archaic)
German form of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Wenceslaus.
WERDHERI m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WERTHER.
WERNER m German, Dutch
From a Germanic name derived from warin "guard" combined with hari "army". A famous bearer was the German physicist Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976).
WERTHER m German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements wert "worthy" and hari "army". Goethe used this name in his novel The Sorrows of Young Werther (1774).
WES m English
Short form of WESLEY.
WESLEY m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WESSEL m Frisian, Dutch
Diminutive of WERNER.
WESTLEY m English
From a surname that was a variant of WESLEY.
WESTON m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west town" in Old English.
WETZEL m German (Rare)
Diminutive of WERNER.
WHITAKER m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "white field" in Old English.
WHITNEY f & m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WIBAWA m Indonesian
Means "authority, power" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit विभव (vibhava).
WIBO m Frisian, Dutch
Diminutive of WIEBE.
WIBOWO m Javanese
Javanese form of WIBAWA.
WICKANINNISH m Indigenous American, Nuu-chah-nulth
Possibly means "having no one in front of him in the canoe" in the Nuu-chah-nulth (or Nootka) language. This was the name of a chief of the Clayoquot in the late 18th century, at the time of European contact.
WIDALD m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and wald "power, rule".
WIDE m Frisian
Frisian form of WIDO.
WIDO m Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element witu "wood" or wit "wide". From early times this name has been confused with the Latin name Vitus.
WIDOGAST m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and gast "stranger, guest".
WIDUKIND m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and chind "child". This was the name of an 8th-century Saxon leader who fought against the Franks.
WIEBE m Frisian, Dutch
Medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element wig meaning "war".
WIĘCESŁAW m Polish (Archaic)
Older Polish form of VÁCLAV.
WIEGAND m German (Rare)
Modern German form of WIGAND.
WIELAND m German, Germanic Mythology
Meaning uncertain, perhaps a derivative of Germanic wela meaning "skilled, artful". In Germanic mythology Wieland (called Völundr in Old Norse) was an unequaled smith and craftsman.
WIELISŁAW m Polish (Rare)
From an old Slavic name meaning "great glory".
WIESŁAW m Polish
Short form of WIELISŁAW.
WIGAND m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element wig meaning "war".
WIGBERHT m Anglo-Saxon, Ancient Germanic
Old English form of WYBERT. This is also a continental Germanic cognate.
WIGBRAND m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and brand "sword".
WIGHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYOT.
WIGMAR m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form (possibly) of GUIOMAR.
WIGMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYMOND.
WIGSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYSTAN.
WIKTOR m Polish
Polish form of VICTOR.
WIL m & f English, Dutch
Short form of WILLIAM and other names beginning with Wil.
WILBERT m Dutch
Means "bright will", derived from the Germanic elements wil "will, desire" and beraht "bright".
WILBUR m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane. Wright was named after the Methodist minister Wilbur Fisk (1792-1839).
WILBURN m English
From a surname that was probably originally derived from an unknown place name. The second element corresponds with Old English burne "stream".
WILEY m English
From a surname that was derived from various English place names: towns named WILLEY or the River WYLYE.
WILF m English
Short form of WILFRED.
WILFORD m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow ford" in Old English.
WILFRED m English
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace". Saint Wilfrid was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
WILFREDO m Spanish
Spanish form of WILFRED.
WILFRID m English
Variant of WILFRED.
WILFRIED m German
German cognate of WILFRED.
WILFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WILFRED.
WILHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLIHARD.
WILHELM m German, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of WILLIAM. This was the name of two German emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
WILHELMUS m Dutch
Latinized form of WILHELM. This is also the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.
WILKIE m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILKIN m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILKY m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILL m English
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WILLABERT m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WILBERT.
WILLAHELM m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of WILLIAM.
WILLAMAR m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and mari "famous".
WILLARD m English
From an English surname that was derived from the Germanic given name WILLIHARD (or the Old English cognate Wilheard).
WILLEM m Dutch
Dutch form of WILLIAM. Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, was the leader of the Dutch revolt against Spain that brought about the independence of the Netherlands. He is considered the founder of the Dutch royal family. In English he is commonly called William of Orange.
WILLI m German
Diminutive of WILHELM.
WILLIAM m English
From the Germanic name Willahelm meaning "will helmet", composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. From then until the modern era it has been among the most common of English names (with John, Thomas and Robert).... [more]
WILLIBALD m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wil "will, desire" and bald "bold". Saint Willibald was an 8th-century bishop of Eichstätt, Bavaria.
WILLIE m & f English
Masculine or feminine diminutive of WILLIAM. A notable bearer is the retired American baseball player Willie Mays (1931-).
WILLIFRID m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic cognate of WILFRED.
WILLIHAD m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and hadu "battle, combat". This was the name of an 8th-century saint active in Frisia and Saxony.
WILLIHARD m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and hard "brave, hardy".
WILLIRIC m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements wil "will, desire" and ric "ruler, mighty".
WILLIS m English
From an English surname that was derived from Will, a diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILLKA m Indigenous American, Aymara
Means "sun" in Aymara.
WILLOUGHBY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow town" in Old English.
WILLY m & f English, German, Dutch
Diminutive of WILLIAM, WILHELM or WILLEM. It is both masculine and feminine in Dutch.
WILMǢR m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLAMAR.
WILMER m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name WILMǢR.
WILMOT m & f Medieval English
Medieval diminutive and feminine form of WILLIAM.
WILSON m English
From an English surname meaning "son of WILLIAM". The surname was borne by Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), the American president during World War I.
WILT m English
Short form of WILTON. This name was borne by basketball player Wilt Chamberlain (1936-1999).
WILTON m English
From a surname that was derived from the names of several English towns. The town names mean variously "willow town", "well town" or "town on the River Wylye" in Old English. The river name is itself of Celtic origin, possibly meaning "tricky".
WIM m Dutch
Dutch short form of WILLEM.
WINCENTY m Polish
Polish form of VINCENT.
WINDSOR m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "riverbank with a windlass" in Old English (a windlass is a lifting apparatus). This has been the surname of the royal family of the United Kingdom since 1917.
WINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English wine "friend".
WINFIELD m English
From a surname that originated from various English place names, themselves derived from Old English winn "meadow, pasture" and feld "field".
WINFRED m English
Means "friend of peace" from the Old English elements wine "friend" and friþ "peace". This was the birth name of the 8th-century missionary Saint Boniface. It became rare after the Norman Conquest, though it was revived in the 19th century.
WINFRIED m German
German form of WINFRED.
WINFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WINFRED.
WINIFRID m Ancient Germanic
Germanic cognate of WINFRIÐ.
WINOC m Breton, French
Variant of GWENNEG.
WINSLOW m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE". A famous bearer of this name was American painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910).
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