Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the description contains the keywords myth or mythology.
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ADONISmGreek Mythology
From Phoenician Adonai which means "lord". In Greek myth Adonis was a handsome young shepherd killed while hunting a wild boar. The anemone flower is said to have sprung from his blood. Because he was loved by Aphrodite, Zeus allowed him to be restored to life for part of each year. The Greeks borrowed this character from Semitic traditions, originally Sumerian (see Dumuzi).
ADRASTEIAfGreek Mythology
Feminine form of ADRASTOS. In Greek mythology this name was borne by a nymph who fostered the infant Zeus. This was also another name of the goddess Nemesis.
AEGLEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Αιγλη (Aigle) which meant "light, radiance, glory". This was the name of several characters in Greek myth, including one of the Heliades and one of the Hesperides.
AELLAfGreek Mythology
Means "whirlwind" in Greek. In Greek myth this was the name of an Amazon warrior killed by Herakles during his quest for Hippolyta's girdle.
AERON (2)f & mWelsh Mythology
Welsh form of AGRONA. In Welsh mythology Aeron was often portrayed as a masculine deity.
AESONmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αισων (Aison), which is of unknown meaning. Aeson was the father of Jason in Greek mythology.
AGAMEMNONmGreek Mythology
Possibly meaning "very steadfast" in Greek. In Greek mythology he was the brother of Menelaus. He led the Greek expedition to Troy to recover his brother's wife Helen. After the Trojan War Agamemnon was killed by his wife Clytemnestra.
AGAUEfGreek Mythology
Means "illustrious, noble" in Greek. This was the mother of Pentheus in Greek myth.
AGLAIAfGreek Mythology, Greek
Means "splendour, beauty" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites). This name was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Rome.
AHURA MAZDAmPersian Mythology
Means "lord of wisdom" in Avestan. In Persian mythology Ahura Mazda was the supreme creator, and the god of light, truth, and goodness.
ÁINEfIrish
Means "radiance" in Gaelic. This was the name of the queen of the fairies in Celtic mythology. It is also taken as an Irish form of Anne.
AJAXmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αιας (Aias), perhaps deriving from Greek αιαστης (aiastes) "mourner" or αια (aia) "earth, land". In Greek mythology this was the name of two of the heroes who fought for the Greeks in the Trojan War, the son of Telamon and the son of Oileus. When the armour of the slain hero Achilles was not given to Ajax Telamonian, he became mad with jealousy and killed himself.
ALBERICHmAncient Germanic, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements alf "elf" and ric "power". Alberich was the name of the sorcerer king of the dwarfs in Germanic mythology. He also appears in the 'Nibelungenlied' as a dwarf who guards the treasure of the Nibelungen.
ALCIPPEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκιππη (Alkippe), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of a daughter of Ares in Greek myth. Her father killed Halirrhotis, a son of Poseidon, when he attempted to rape her, leading to a murder trial in which Ares was quickly acquitted.
ALCMENEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκμηνη (Alkmene), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and μηνη (mene) "moon". In Greek mythology Alcmene was the wife of Amphitryon. She was the mother of Herakles by Zeus, who bedded her by disguising himself as her absent husband.
ALCYONEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αλκυονη (Alkyone), derived from the word αλκυων (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
ALECTOfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αληκτω (Alekto) which was derived from αληκτος (alektos) "unceasing". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology.
ALEXANDERmEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALEXANDRAfEnglish, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALTHEAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αλθαια (Althaia), perhaps related to Greek αλθος (althos) "healing". In Greek myth she was the mother of Meleager. Soon after her son was born she was told that he would die as soon as a piece of wood that was burning on her fire was fully consumed. She immediately extinguished the piece of wood and sealed it in a chest, but in a fit of rage many years later she took it out and set it alight, thereby killing her son.
ALUNmWelsh
Welsh form of ALAN. This name appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
ALVISmNorse Mythology
Means "all wise" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology this was the name of a dwarf who was to marry Thor's daughter Thrud. Thor was not pleased with this so he tricked Alvis by asking him questions until the sun rose, at which time the dwarf was turned into stone.
AMALTHEAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αμαλθεια (Amaltheia), derived from μαλθασσω (malthasso) meaning "to soften, to soothe". In Greek myth she was a goat who nursed the infant Zeus.
AMIRANImGeorgian Mythology
Meaning unknown, probably of Proto-Kartvelian origin. This is the name of a hero from Georgian mythology whose story is similar to that of Prometheus from Greek mythology.
AMONmEgyptian Mythology (Anglicized)
From Αμμων (Ammon), the Greek form of Egyptian Ymn (reconstructed as Yamanu) which meant "the hidden one". In early Egyptian mythology he was a god of the air, creativity and fertility, who was particularly revered in Thebes. Later, during the Middle Kingdom, his attributes were combined with those of the god Ra and he was worshipped as the supreme solar deity Amon-Ra.
AMULIUSmRoman Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Roman mythology Amulius overthrew his brother Numitor, king of Alba Longa, but was eventually deposed by Numitor's grandsons Romulus and Remus.
ANDROMEDAfGreek Mythology
Means "to be mindful of a man" from the Greek element ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος) combined with μεδομαι (medomai) "to be mindful of". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
ANGHARADfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "more love" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, Angharad Golden-hand is the lover of Peredur.
ANGRA MAINYUmPersian Mythology
Means "evil spirit" in Avestan. In Persian mythology Angra Mainyu was the god of darkness, death and destruction, the enemy of Ahura Mazda.
ANTIOPEfGreek Mythology
Derived from the Greek elements αντι (anti) "against, compared to, like" and οψ (ops) "voice". This was the name of several figures in Greek mythology, including a daughter of Ares who was one of the queens of the Amazons. She was kidnapped and married by Theseus.
AODHmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings. It has been traditionally Anglicized as Hugh.
AODHÁNmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (see AODH). This was the name of an Irish monk and saint of the 7th century. It was also borne by several characters in Irish mythology.
AOIDEfGreek Mythology
Means "song" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the original three muses, the muse of song.
APOLLOmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Απολλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb απολλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.
ARACHNEfGreek Mythology
Means "spider" in Greek. In Greek myth Arachne was a mortal woman who defeated Athena in a weaving contest. After this Arachne hanged herself, but Athena brought her back to life in the form of a spider.
ARAMAZDmArmenian Mythology
From a combination of the mythological figures ARA and AHURA MAZDA. This was the name of the supreme creator god in pre-Christian Armenian mythology.
ARAWNmWelsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the god of the underworld, called Annwfn, in Welsh mythology.
ARESmGreek Mythology
Perhaps from either Greek αρη (are) "bane, ruin" or αρσην (arsen) "male". The name first appears as a-re in Mycenaean Greek writing. Ares was the blood-thirsty god of war in Greek mythology, a son of Zeus and Hera.
ARETHUSAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αρεθουσα (Arethousa), which is possibly derived from αρδω (ardo) "water" and θοος (thoos) "quick, nimble". This was the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who was transformed into a fountain.
ARGUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αργος (Argos), derived from αργος (argos) meaning "glistening, shining". In Greek myth this name belonged to both the man who built the Argo and a man with a hundred eyes.
ARIADNEfGreek Mythology
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) "most" and αδνος (adnos) "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ARIANRHODfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Possibly means "silver wheel" or "round wheel" in Welsh. In Welsh myth Arianrhod was the mother of the brothers Dylan and Lleu Llaw Gyffes. In earlier myths she was a goddess of the moon.
ARMAZImGeorgian Mythology
Possibly related to the name of the Armenian god ARAMAZD or the Zoroastrian god AHURA MAZDA. In pre-Christian Georgian mythology Armazi was the supreme god.
ARUSHIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "hitting, killing" in Sanskrit. In Hindu mythology this is the name of a daughter of Manu.
ASKmNorse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse askr "ash tree". In Norse mythology Ask and his wife Embla were the first humans created by the gods.
ASKLEPIOSmGreek Mythology
Possibly means "cut up" in Greek. Asklepios (Aesculapius to the Romans) was the god of healing and medicine in Greek mythology.
ATLASmGreek Mythology
Possibly means "enduring" from Greek τλαω (tlao) meaning "to endure". In Greek mythology he was a Titan punished by Zeus by being forced to support the heavens on his shoulders.
ATROPOSfGreek Mythology
Means "inevitable, inflexible" in Greek, derived from the negative prefix α (a) combined with τροπος (tropos) "direction, manner, fashion". Atropos was one of the three Fates or Μοιραι (Moirai) in Greek mythology. When her sister Lachesis decided that a person's life was at an end, Atropos would choose the manner of death and cut the person's life thread.
BALDERmNorse Mythology
Means "prince" from Old Norse. In Norse mythology Balder was the son of Odin and Frigg. Because of the disturbing dreams he had when he was young, his mother extracted an oath from every thing in the world that it would not harm him. However the evil fire god Loki learned that she had overlooked mistletoe. Being jealous, he tricked the blind god Hoder into throwing a branch of mistletoe at Balder, which killed him.
BASTfEgyptian Mythology
Possibly means "fire, heat" or "ointment jar" in Egyptian. In Egyptian mythology Bast was a goddess of cats, fertility and the sun who was considered a protector of Lower Egypt. She was often depicted with the head of a lioness or a house cat. As her role in the Egyptian pantheon diminished, she was called Bastet.
BATRAZmOssetian, Caucasian Mythology
Possibly from Turkic bagatur meaning "hero, warrior, brave". This is the name of the leader of the superhuman Narts in Caucasian mythology.
BÉBINNfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "fair lady" in Irish Gaelic. This name was borne by several characters in Irish mythology, including a goddess of childbirth.
BILEmIrish Mythology
Possibly an Irish form of BELENUS, though it may derive from an Irish word meaning "hero". In Irish mythology this was the name of one of the Milesians who was drowned while invading Ireland.
BORGHILDfNorwegian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old Norse elements borg "fortification" and hildr "battle". In Norse mythology she was the wife of Sigmund.
BRANWENfWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRIDGETfIrish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BRISEISfGreek Mythology
Patronymic derived from Βρισευς (Briseus), a Greek name of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology Briseis (real name Hippodameia) was the daughter of Briseus. She was captured during the Trojan War by Achilles. After Agamemnon took her away from him, Achilles refused to fight in the war.
BRONTESmGreek Mythology
Means "thunderer" in Greek. In Greek mythology (according to Hesiod), this was the name of one of the three Cyclopes, who were the sons of Uranus and Gaia.
CADMUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Καδμος (Kadmos), of uncertain meaning. In Greek mythology Cadmus was the son of the Phoenician king Agenor. He was sent by his father to rescue his sister Europa, who had been abducted by Zeus, although he did not succeed in retrieving her. According to legend, Cadmus founded the city of Thebes and introduced the alphabet to Greece.
CADWGANmWelsh
Means "glory in battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwogawn "glory, honour". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, this name is briefly mentioned as the son of Iddon.
CALYPSOfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Καλυψω (Kalypso) which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλυπτω (kalypto) "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.
CASSANDRAfEnglish, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CASSIOPEIAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιοπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιεπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
CASTORmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Καστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κεκαστο). In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
CERBERUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κερβερος (Kerberos), which possibly meant "spotted". In Greek myth this was the name of the three-headed dog that guarded the entrance to Hades.
CERESfRoman Mythology
Derived from the Indo-European root *ker meaning "to grow". In Roman mythology Ceres was the goddess of agriculture, equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter.
CHARONmGreek Mythology
Possibly means "fierce brightness" in Greek. In Greek mythology Charon was the operator of the ferry that brought the newly dead over the River Acheron into Hades.
CHLORISfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek χλωρος (chloros) meaning "pale green". Chloris, in Greek mythology, was a minor goddess of vegetation.
CHRYSESmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) meaning "golden". In Greek mythology Chryses was the father of Chryseis, a woman captured by Agamemnon during the Trojan War.
CHUKWUmMythology
Derived from Igbo chi "god, spirtual being" and ukwu "great". In Igbo mythology Chukwu is the supreme god who created the universe. Christian Igbo people use this name for the Christian god.
CIRCEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κιρκη (Kirke), which possibly meant "bird". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs but was forced by him to change them back.
CULHWCHmWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "hiding place of the pig" in Welsh. In Welsh legend he was the lover of Olwen the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Before the giant would allow Culhwch to marry his daughter, he insisted that Culhwch complete a series of extremely difficult tasks. Culhwch managed to complete them, and he returned to marry Olwen and kill the giant. This tale appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
DAEDALUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Δαιδαλος (Daidalos) which was derived from δαιδαλλω (daidallo) meaning "to work cunningly". In Greek myth Daedalus was an Athenian inventor who was banished to Crete. There he designed the Labyrinth for King Minos, but he and his son Icarus were eventually imprisoned inside it because he had aided Theseus in his quest against the Minotaur. Daelalus and Icarus escaped using wings fashioned from wax, but Icarus fell from the sky to his death.
DAGDAmIrish Mythology
Means "good god" in Celtic. In Irish myth Dagda (called also The Dagda) was the powerful god of the earth, knowledge, magic, abundance and treaties, a leader of the Tuatha De Danann. He was skilled in combat and healing and possessed a huge club, the handle of which could revive the dead.
DANAËfGreek Mythology
From Δαναοι (Danaoi), a word used by Homer to designate the Greeks. In Greek mythology Danaë was the daughter of the Argive king Acrisius. It had been prophesized to her father that he would one day be killed by Danaë's son, so he attempted to keep his daughter childless. However, Zeus came to her in the form of a shower of gold, and she became the mother of Perseus. Eventually the prophecy was fulfilled and Perseus killed Acrisius, albeit accidentally.
DAPHNEfGreek Mythology, English, Dutch
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.
DARDANOSmGreek Mythology
Possibly from Greek δαρδαπτω (dardapto) "to devour". In Greek mythology Dardanos was a son of Zeus and Electra. He was the founder of the city of Dardania in Asia Minor.
DEMETER (1)fGreek Mythology
Possibly means "earth mother", derived from Greek δα (da) "earth" and μητηρ (meter) "mother". In Greek mythology Demeter was the goddess of agriculture, the daughter of Cronus, the sister of Zeus, and the mother of Persephone. She was an important figure in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites performed at Eleusis near Athens.
DESPOINAfGreek Mythology, Greek
Means "mistress, lady" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of the daughter of Demeter and Poseidon. She was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at Eleusis near Athens.
DIARMAIDmIrish, Irish Mythology
Perhaps means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne. It was also the name of several ancient Irish kings.
DIKEfGreek Mythology
Means "justice" in Greek. In Greek mythology Dike was the goddess of justice, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai).
DIONYSOSmGreek Mythology
From Greek Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" combined with NYSA, the name of the region where young Dionysos was said to have been raised. In Greek mythology Dionysos was the god of wine, revelry, fertility and dance. He was the son of Zeus and Semele.
DORISfEnglish, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-).
DYLANmWelsh, English, Welsh Mythology
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.... [more]
ECHOfGreek Mythology
Means "echo" from the word for the repeating reflected sound, which derives from Greek ηχη (eche) "sound". In Greek mythology Echo was a nymph given a speech impediment by Hera, so that she could only repeat what others said. She fell in love with Narcissus, but her love was not returned, and she pined away until nothing remained of her except her voice.
ELECTRAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ηλεκτρα (Elektra), derived from ηλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.
ELENfWelsh
Welsh form of HELEN. This was the name of a 4th-century Welsh saint. It also appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, belonging to a woman who built the roads in Wales.
ELPISfAncient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "hope" in Greek. In Greek mythology Elpis was the personification of hope. She was the last spirit to remain in the jar after Pandora unleashed the evils that were in it.
ELYSIAfVarious
From Elysium, the name of the realm of the dead in Greek and Roman mythology, which means "blissful".
EMBLAfNorse Mythology, Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Old Norse almr "elm". In Norse mythology Embla and her husband Ask were the first humans. They were created by three of the gods from two trees.
ENDYMIONmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ενδυειν (endyein) meaning "to dive into, to enter". In Greek mythology he was an Aeolian mortal loved by the moon goddess Selene, who asked Zeus to grant him eternal life. Zeus complied by putting him into an eternal sleep in a cave on Mount Latmos.
EPIMETHEUSmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek επιμηθεια (epimetheia) meaning "hindsight, hindthought". In Greek mythology he was a Titan, the brother of the god of forethought Prometheus.
ERATOfGreek Mythology
Means "lovely" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, the muse of lyric poetry.
EREBUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ερεβος (Erebos) which means "nether darkness". Erebus was the personification of the primordial darkness in Greek mythology.
ERESHKIGALfSumerian Mythology
Means "lady of the great earth", from Sumerian 𒊩𒌆 (ereš) meaning "lady, queen" combined with 𒆠 (ki) meaning "earth" and 𒃲 (gal) meaning "great, big". In Sumerian mythology she was the goddess of death and the underworld.
ERISfGreek Mythology
Means "strife" in Greek. In Greek mythology Eris was the goddess of discord. She was the sister and companion of Ares.
EROSmGreek Mythology
Means "love" in Greek. In Greek mythology he was a young god, the son of Aphrodite, who was armed with arrows that caused the victim to fall in love.
ÉTAÍNfIrish, Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Irish ét "jealousy". In Irish mythology she was a sun and horse goddess who was the lover of Midir.
EUANTHEfAncient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ευανθης (euanthes) meaning "blooming, flowery", a derivative of ευ (eu) "good" and ανθος (anthos) "flower". According to some sources, this was the name of the mother of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
EUDORAfGreek Mythology
Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements ευ (eu) "good" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.
EUPHROSYNEfGreek Mythology
Means "mirth, merriment" in Greek. She was one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
EUROPAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ευρωπη (Europe), which meant "wide face" from ευρυς (eurys) "wide" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Greek mythology Europa was a Phoenician princess who was abducted and taken to Crete by Zeus in the guise of a bull. She became the first queen of Crete, and later fathered Minos by Zeus. The continent of Europe is named for her. This is also the name of a moon of Jupiter.
EURYDICEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ευρυδικη (Eurydike) which meant "wide justice", derived from ευρυς (eurys) "wide" and δικη (dike) "justice". In Greek myth she was the wife of Orpheus. Her husband tried to rescue her from Hades, but he failed when he disobeyed the condition that he not look back upon her on their way out.
EUTERPEfGreek Mythology
Means "delight" in Greek, ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and τερπω (terpo) "to satisfy, to cheer". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, the muse of music and joy. She was said to have invented the double flute.
EVANDER (1)mGreek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros), derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.
EVRENm & fTurkish
Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish. In Turkic mythology the Evren is a gigantic snake-like dragon.
FELICITASfGerman, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Latin name which meant "good luck, fortune". In Roman mythology the goddess Felicitas was the personification of good luck. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a slave martyred with her master Perpetua in Carthage.
FREYAfNorse Mythology, English (British, Modern), German
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.... [more]
FRIGGfNorse Mythology
Means "beloved" in Old Norse, ultimately derived from Indo-European *pri "to love". In Norse mythology she was the goddess of the earth, air and fertility, and the wife of Odin. Some scholars believe that she and the goddess Freya share a common origin.
GABIJAfLithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Probably from Lithuanian gaubti meaning "to cover". In Lithuanian mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire and the home.
GAIAfGreek Mythology, Italian
From the Greek word γαια (gaia), a parallel form of γη (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GANYMEDEmGreek Mythology (Anglicized)
From Greek Γανυμηδης (Ganymedes), which was possibly derived from γανυμαι (ganymai) "to be glad" and μηδομαι (medomai) "to think, to plan". In Greek mythology this was the name of a beautiful boy who was abducted by Zeus to become the cupbearer to the gods, the successor of Hebe. A moon of Jupiter is named after him.
GERD (2)fSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse garðr meaning "enclosure". In Norse myth Gerd was a fertility goddess, a frost giantess who was the wife of Freyr.
GORONWYmWelsh, Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, he was the lover of Blodeuwedd. He attempted to murder her husband Lleu Llaw Gyffes but was himself killed.
GRIDfNorse Mythology
Means "peace" in Old Norse. In Norse myth she was a frost giantess, the mother of Víðarr by Odin. She also aided Thor in his fight against the giant Geirrod.
GRÓAfNorse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse gróa "to grow". This is the name of a seeress in Norse mythology.
HADESmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek ‘Αιδης (Haides), derived from αιδης (aides) meaning "unseen". In Greek mythology Hades was the dark god of the underworld, which was also called Hades. His brother was Zeus and his wife was Persephone.
HATHORfEgyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Het-Heru which means "the house of Horus", derived from Egyptian hwt "house" combined with Hr the god HORUS. In Egyptian mythology she was the goddess of love, often depicted with the head of a cow.
HEBEfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ‘ηβη (hebe) meaning "youth". In Greek mythology Hebe was the daughter of Zeus and Hera. She was a goddess of youth who acted as the cupbearer to the gods.
HECATEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek ‘Εκατη (Hekate), possibly derived from ‘εκας (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
HECUBAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκαβη (Hekabe), which is of uncertain meaning. In Greek mythology this is the name of the wife of Priam of Troy.
HEIDRUNfNorse Mythology, German
Derived from Old Norse heiðr meaning "bright, clear" and rún meaning "secret". In Norse mythology this was the name of a goat that would eat the leaves from the tree of life and produce mead in her udder.
HELfNorse Mythology
In Norse mythology this was the name of the daughter of Loki. She got her name from the underworld, also called Hel, where she ruled, which meant "to conceal, to cover" in Old Norse (related to the English word hell).
HELENfEnglish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HELLE (2)fGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Helle was the daughter of Athamus and Nephele. She and her brother Phrixus escaped sacrifice by fleeing on the back of a golden ram, but during their flight she fell off and drowned in the strait that connects the Aegean Sea with the Sea of Marmara, which was thereafter called the Hellespont ("the sea of Helle").
HEPHAESTUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Ηφαιστος (Hephaistos), meaning unknown. It probably shares its origin with the Minoan city of Φαιστος (Phaistos), which is of Pre-Greek origin. In Greek mythology Hephaestus was the god of fire and forging, the husband of the unfaithful Aphrodite. It was said that when he was born Hera, his mother, was so displeased with his physical deformities that she hurled him off the top of Mount Olympus.
HERAfGreek Mythology
Uncertain meaning, possibly from either Greek ‘ηρως (heros) "hero, warrior"; ‘ωρα (hora) "period of time"; or ‘αιρεω (haireo) "to be chosen". In Greek mythology Hera was the queen of the gods, the sister and wife of Zeus. She presided over marriage and childbirth.
HERAKLESmGreek Mythology
Means "glory of Hera" from the name of the goddess HERA combined with Greek κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of a hero in Greek and Roman mythology, the son of Zeus and the mortal woman Alcmene. After being driven insane by Hera and killing his own children, Herakles completed twelve labours in order to atone for his crime and become immortal.
HERMIONEfGreek Mythology
Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
HESPEROSmAncient Greek
Means "evening" in Greek. This was the name of the personification of the Evening Star (the planet Venus) in Greek mythology.
HESTIAfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ‘εστια (hestia) "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.
HORUSmEgyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of ‘Ωρος (Horos), the Greek form of Egyptian Hrw (reconstructed as Heru) possibly meaning "falcon" or "high". In Egyptian mythology Horus was the god of light, often depicted as a man with the head of a falcon. The son Osiris and Isis, he avenged his father's murder by killing Seth.
HUITZILOPOCHTLImAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "southern hummingbird" or "left-handed hummingbird" in Nahuatl. In Aztec mythology he was the god of the sun and war. He was a patron deity of the city of Tenochtitlan (at the site of modern Mexico City).
HULDA (1)fIcelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "sweet, lovable".
HYPERIONmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ‘υπερ (hyper) "over". In Greek myth this was the name of a Titan who presided over the sun and light. By Theia he was the father of the sun god Helios, the moon goddess Selene, and the dawn goddess Eos.
IAHmEgyptian Mythology
Means "moon" in Egyptian. In Egyptian mythology this was the name of a god of the moon, later identified with Thoth.
IANTHEfGreek Mythology
Means "violet flower", derived from Greek ιον (ion) "violet" and ανθος (anthos) "flower". This was the name of an ocean nymph in Greek mythology.
IAPETOSmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ιαπτω (iapto) "to wound, to pierce". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan, the father of Atlas, Prometheus and Epimetheus.
ICARUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ικαρος (Ikaros), of unknown meaning. In Greek myth Icarus was the son of Daedalus, locked with his father inside the Labyrinth by Minos. They escaped from the maze using wings devised from wax, but Icarus flew too close to the sun and the wax melted, plunging him to his death.
IDAfEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'The Princess' (1847), which was later adapted into the play 'Princess Ida' (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
ILMARINENmFinnish Mythology
Derived from Finnish ilma "air". Ilmarinen is an immortal smith in Finnish mythology, the creator of the sky and the magic mill known as the Sampo. He is one of the main characters in the Finnish epic the 'Kalevala'.
ILMATARfFinnish Mythology
Derived from Finnish ilma "air". In Finnish mythology Ilmatar was a semi-androgynous goddess of the heavens. She was the mother of Ilmarinen, Väinämöinen and Lemminkäinen.
IOfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.
IOLEfGreek Mythology
Means "violet" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a woman beloved by Herakles.
ION (2)mGreek Mythology
Of unknown etymology, possibly pre-Greek. According to Greek mythology he was a son of Creusa and Xuthus (or alternatively the god Apollo). He was said to be the ancestor of the Greek tribe of the Ionians.
IONEfGreek Mythology, English
From Greek ιον (ion) meaning "violet flower". This was the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, though perhaps based on the Greek place name Ionia, a region on the west coast of Asia Minor.
IORWERTHmWelsh
Means "handsome lord" from Welsh ior "lord" and berth "handsome". This name is used in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, where it belongs to a son of Maredudd. This name is sometimes used as a Welsh form of EDWARD.
IPHIGENEIAfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ιφιος (iphios) "strong, stout" and γενης (genes) "born". In Greek myth Iphigenia was the daughter of King Agamemnon. When her father offended Artemis it was divined that the only way to appease the goddess was to sacrifice Iphigenia. Just as Agamemnon was about to sacrifice his daughter she was magically transported to the city of Taurus.... [more]
ISISfEgyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Ist (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), which possibly meant "the throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.
IÐUNNfNorse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Probably derived from Old Norse "again" and unna "to love". In Norse mythology Iðunn was the goddess of spring and immortality whose responsibility it was to guard the gods' apples of youth.
IZANAGImFar Eastern Mythology
Means "male who invites" in Japanese. In Japanese mythology the god Izanagi was the husband of Izanami. When she died he unsuccessfully journeyed to the underworld to retrieve her. In the purifying rites that followed his return the gods of the sun, moon and wind were created.
IZANAMIfFar Eastern Mythology
Means "female who invites" in Japanese. In Japanese mythology she was a creator goddess, the wife of Izanagi. She died giving birth to Kagututi, the god of fire.
JASONmEnglish, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical
From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father Aeson as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.... [more]
JAYANTAmHinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese
Derived from Sanskrit जयन्त (jayanta) meaning "victorious". This is the name of a son of the Hindu god Indra, as well as other figures in Hindu mythology.
JOCASTAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ιοκαστη (Iokaste), which is of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology she was the mother Oedipus by the Theban king Laius. In a case of tragic mistaken identity, she married her own son.
JUNOfRoman Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "youth", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.
JUPITERmRoman Mythology (Anglicized)
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, composed of the elements Dyeus (see ZEUS) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
KALEV (1)mEstonian
Estonian form of KALEVA. This was the name of a hero in Estonian mythology.
KALLIOPEfGreek Mythology
Means "beautiful voice" from Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty" and οψ (ops) meaning "voice". In Greek mythology she was a goddess of epic poetry and eloquence, one of the nine Muses.
KALLISTOfGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek καλλιστος (kallistos) meaning "most beautiful", a derivative of καλος (kalos) meaning "beautiful". In Greek mythology Kallisto was a nymph who was loved by Zeus. She was changed into a she-bear by Hera, and subsequently became the Great Bear constellation. This was also an ancient Greek personal name.
KAVEHmPersian, Persian Mythology
Possibly means "royal" in Avestan. In Persian mythology Kaveh is a blacksmith who leads a rebellion against the evil ruler Zahhak.
KLEIOfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of history and heroic poetry, one of the nine Muses. She was said to have introduced the alphabet to Greece.
KLOTHOfGreek Mythology
Means "spinner" in Greek. In Greek mythology Klotho was one of the three Fates or Μοιραι (Moirai). She was responsible for spinning the thread of life.
KLYTIËfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek κλυτος (klytos) meaning "famous, noble". In Greek myth Klytië was an ocean nymph who loved the sun god Helios. Her love was not returned, and she pined away staring at him until she was transformed into a heliotrope flower, whose head moves to follow the sun.
KOIOSmGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek κοιος (koios), also spelled ποιος (poios), a questioning word meaning approximately "of what kind?". This was the name of a Titan god of intelligence in Greek mythology.
KREIOSmGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from either Greek κρειων (kreion) "lord, master" or κριος (krios) "ram, male sheep". This was the name of a Titan in Greek mythology.
KUKULKANmMayan Mythology
Means "feathered serpent" in Mayan. This is the name of snake god in Maya legend, roughly equivalent to Quetzalcoatl in Aztec mythology.
LACHESISfGreek Mythology
Means "apportioner" in Greek. She was one of the three Fates or Μοιραι (Moirai) in Greek mythology. She was responsible for deciding how long each person had to live.
LAIUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Λαιος (Laios), which is of unknown meaning. This was the name of a king of Thebes in Greek mythology, the husband of Jocasta. Due to a prophecy that he would be killed by his son, Laius left his infant Oedipus for dead. The boy survived but was ignorant of his true parentage. Years later he unwittingly killed Laius in a quarrel on the road.
LAMIA (2)fGreek Mythology
Possibly from Greek λαιμος (laimos) "throat". In Greek mythology this is the name of a queen of Libya who was a mistress of Zeus. Hera, being jealous, kills Lamia's children, causing her to go mad and transform into a monster that hunts the children of others.
LARUNDAfRoman Mythology
Possibly connected to Greek λαλεω (laleo) "to talk, to chatter", or the Latin term Lares referring to minor guardian gods. In Roman mythology Larunda or Lara was a water nymph who was overly talkative. She revealed to Juno that her husband Jupiter was having an affair with Juturna, so Jupiter had Larunda's tongue removed. By the god Mercury she had two children, who were Lares.
LAUMAfLatvian, Baltic Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Latvian mythology this is the name of a forest spirit sometimes associated with childbirth and weaving.
LEDAfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek myth she was the mother of Castor, Pollux, Helen and Clytemnestra by the god Zeus, who came upon her in the form of a swan.
LETOfGreek Mythology
Possibly from Lycian lada meaning "wife". Other theories connect it to Greek ληθω (letho) meaning "hidden, forgotten". In Greek mythology she was the mother of Apollo and Artemis by Zeus.
LÓEGAIREmIrish Mythology, Ancient Irish
Means "calf herder", derived from Irish loagh "calf". In Irish mythology Lóegaire Búadach was an Ulster warrior. He saved the life of the poet Áed, but died in the process. This was also the name of several Irish high kings.
LOTUSfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the lotus flower (species Nelumbo nucifera) or the mythological lotus tree. They are ultimately derived from Greek λωτος (lotos). In Greek and Roman mythology the lotus tree was said to produce a fruit causing sleepiness and forgetfulness.
LOUHIfFinnish Mythology
Variant of LOVIATAR. In Finnish mythology Louhi was another name of the death goddess Loviatar. She appears in the Finnish epic the 'Kalevala' as a witch ruling the northern area known as Pohjola. She is the primary antagonist to the hero Väinämöinen.
LOVIATARfFinnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Finnish mythology Loviatar, also known as Louhi, was a goddess of death and plague.
LUGALBANDAmSumerian Mythology
From Sumerian lugal "king" and banda "young, wild, fierce". This was the name of a legendary king of Uruk who was said to be the father of Gilgamesh in Sumerian mythology.
LUGHmIrish Mythology
Probably an Irish form of LUGUS. In Irish mythology Lugh was a divine hero who led the Tuatha De Danann against the Fomorians who were led by his grandfather Balor. Lugh killed Balor by shooting a stone into his giant eye.
LUNEDfWelsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Variant of ELUNED. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is a servant of the Lady of the Fountain who rescues the knight Owain.
LYCUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυκος (Lykos) meaning "wolf". This name was borne by several characters in Greek mythology including a legendary ruler of Thebes.
LYSSA (2)fGreek Mythology
Means "rage, fury, anger" in Greek. In Greek mythology Lyssa is a goddess associated with uncontrolled rage.
MACSENmWelsh
Welsh form of MAXIMUS. Magnus Maximus (known as Macsen in Welsh) was a 4th-century co-ruler of the Western Roman Empire. In Wales he was regarded as the founder of several royal lineages. He appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth.
MAGNImAncient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old Norse element magn meaning "mighty, strong". In Norse mythology this name is borne by a son of Thor and the giant Járnsaxa.
MAIA (1)fGreek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Portuguese, Georgian
Meaning unknown. In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.
MARAMAfPolynesian Mythology
Means "moon" in Maori. In Maori and other Polynesian mythology she was the goddess of the moon and death.
MARI (3)fMythology
Possibly from Basque emari "donation" or amari "mother". This was the name of a goddess of the weather and fertility in Basque mythology.
MARSmRoman Mythology
Possibly related to Latin mas "male" (genitive maris). In Roman mythology Mars was the god of war, often equated with the Greek god Ares. This is also the name of the fourth planet in the solar system.
MAUIm & fHawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Hawaiian mythology Māui was a trickster who created the Hawaiian Islands by having his brothers fish them out of the sea. He was also responsible for binding the sun and slowing its movement.
MEDEAfGreek Mythology (Latinized), Georgian
From Greek Μηδεια (Medeia), possibly derived from μηδομαι (medomai) "to think, to plan". In Greek mythology Medea was a sorceress from Colchis (modern Georgia) who helped Jason gain the Golden Fleece. They were married, but eventually Jason left her for another woman. For revenge Medea slew Jason's new lover and also had her own children by Jason killed.
MEDUSAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Μεδουσα (Medousa), which was derived from μεδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over". In Greek myth this was the name of one of the three Gorgons, ugly women who had snakes for hair. She was so hideous that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone, so the hero Perseus had to look using the reflection in his shield in order to slay her.
MEGAERAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Μεγαιρα (Megaira) which was derived from μεγαιρω (megairo) "to grudge". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. The name is used as a word in several European languages to denote a shrewish, ill-tempered woman (for example, French mégère and Italian megera).
MELAINAfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a nymph in Greek mythology.
MELETEfGreek Mythology
Means "practice, exercise" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the original three muses, the muse of meditation.
MELIAfGreek Mythology
Means "ash tree" in Greek, a derivative of μελι (meli) "honey". This was the name of a nymph in Greek myth, the daughter of the Greek god Okeanos.
MELISSAfEnglish, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "bee" in Greek. This was the name of a nymph that cared for young Zeus in Greek mythology. It is also the name of the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina in Ludovico Ariosto's poem 'Orlando Furioso' (1516). As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
MELPOMENEfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek μελπω (melpo) meaning "to sing, to celebrate with song". This was the name of one of the nine Muses in Greek mythology, the muse of tragedy.
METISfGreek Mythology
Means "wisdom, skill, cunning" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a Titan. Because it was prophesized that her children would be wiser than Zeus, he swallowed her after he had impregnated her. However, their daughter Athena eventually burst from his head fully grown.
MICTLANTECUHTLImAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "lord of Mictlan" in Nahuatl. In Aztec mythology he was the skeletal ruler of Mictlan, the realm of the dead, with his wife Mictecacihuatl.
MIDASmGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek myth Midas was a king of Phrygia in Asia Minor. He was granted a wish by the god Dionysos - that everything he touch be turned to gold.
MINOSmGreek Mythology
Possibly from a Cretan word or title meaning "king". This was the name of a king of Crete in Greek mythology. He was the son of Zeus and Europa. Because Minos had refused to sacrifice a certain bull to Poseidon, the god had caused his wife Pasiphaë to mate with the bull, which produced the half-bull creature called the Minotaur. Minos had Daedalus construct the Labyrinth to house the beast, but it was eventually slain by Theseus.
MITHRAmPersian Mythology
Derived from an Indo-Iranian root *mitra meaning "oath, alliance, friend". In Persian mythology he was a god of light and friendship, the son of the supreme god Ahura Mazda. Worship of him eventually spread outside of Persia, where it was known as Mithraism.
MNEMEfGreek Mythology
Means "memory" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the original three muses, the muse of memory.
MNEMOSYNEfGreek Mythology
Means "remembrance" in Greek. In Greek mythology Mnemosyne was a Titan goddess of memory. She was the mother by Zeus of the nine Muses.
MOIRAfIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
MORANAfSlavic Mythology, Croatian
From a Slavic root meaning "death, plague". In Slavic mythology this was the name of the goddess of winter and death.
MORPHEUSmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek μορφη (morphe) meaning "shape", referring to the shapes seen in dreams. In Greek mythology Morpheus was the god of dreams.
MORRIGANfIrish Mythology
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
MUBIRUmEastern African, Ganda
Meaning unknown. This is the name of a figure in Ganda mythology associated with forests and hunting.
MUMBIfEastern African, Kikuyu
Means "she who shapes" in Kikuyu. In Kikuyu mythology Mumbi was the wife of Gikuyu and the mother of his nine daughters.
MYLES (2)mGreek Mythology
Probably from Greek μυλη (myle) meaning "mill". This was the name of a king of Laconia in Greek mythology.
NAGENDRAmHinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu
Means "lord of snakes" from Sanskrit नाग (naga) meaning "snake" (also "elephant") combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "lord". This is another name for Vasuki, the king of snakes, in Hindu mythology.
NAIDAfCroatian
Meaning uncertain, possibly derived from Greek Ναιαδ (Naiad), a type of water nymph in Greek mythology.
NANABOZHOmNew World Mythology
Means "my rabbit" in Ojibwe. In Anishinaabe mythology Nanabozho (also called Wenabozho) is the name of a trickster spirit.
NAPOLEONmHistory, English
From the old Italian name Napoleone, used most notably by the French emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was born on Corsica. The etymology is uncertain, but it is possibly derived from the Germanic Nibelungen meaning "sons of mist", a name used in Germanic mythology to refer to the keepers of a hoard of treasure (often identified with the Burgundians). Alternatively, it could be connected to the name of the Italian city of Napoli (Naples).
NARCISSUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized), Late Roman, Biblical
Latinized form of Greek Ναρκισσος (Narkissos), possibly derived from ναρκη (narke) meaning "sleep, numbness". Narkissos was a beautiful youth in Greek mythology who stared at his own reflection for so long that he eventually died and was turned into the narcissus flower.... [more]
NECHTANmIrish Mythology, Ancient Celtic
Celtic name of uncertain meaning, possibly meaning "damp" (cognate with NEPTUNE). In Irish mythology Nechtan was the husband of Boand, the goddess of the River Boyne. This name was also borne by the 5th-century Saint Nectan of Hartland in Devon, who was supposedly born in Ireland. It was also the name of several kings of the Picts.
NEMESISfGreek Mythology
Means "distribution of what is due, righteous anger" in Greek. In Greek mythology Nemesis was personification of vengeance and justice.
NEPTUNEmRoman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Neptunus, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Indo-European root *nebh "wet, damp, clouds". Neptune was the god of the sea in Roman mythology, approximately equivalent to the Greek god Poseidon. This is also the name of the eighth planet in the solar system.
NEREUSmGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Derived from Greek νηρος (neros) meaning "water". In Greek myth this was the name of a god of the sea, the father of the Nereids. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament, belonging to a Christian in Rome. This was also the name of a Roman saint of the 1st century, a member of the army, who was martyred with his companion Achilleus because they refused to execute Christians.
NINGALfSumerian Mythology
Means "great lady", from Sumerian 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and 𒃲 (gal) meaning "big, great". This was the name of a goddess of reeds in Sumerian mythology. She was the daughter of Enki and the wife of Nanna.
NINSUNfSumerian Mythology
From Sumerian nin-sumun-a(k) meaning "lady of the wild cow", derived from 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and the genitive form of 𒄢 (sumun) meaning "wild cow". In Sumerian mythology Ninsun was the divine mother of Gilgamesh.
NINURTAmSumerian Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Derived from Sumerian 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lord" and 𒅁 (urta) meaning "ear of barley". In Sumerian and Akkadian mythology Ninurta was a god of agriculture, hunting and healing, later associated with war. He was also called Ningirsu, though they may have originally been separate deities.
NIOBEfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Niobe was the daughter of Tantalos, a king of Asia Minor. Because she boasted that she was superior to Leto, Leto's children Apollo and Artemis killed her 14 children with poison arrows. In grief, Niobe was turned to stone by Zeus.
NOKOMISfNew World Mythology
Means "my grandmother" in Ojibwe. In Anishinaabe mythology this is the name of Nanabozho's grandmother. It was used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow for the grandmother of Hiawatha in his poem 'The Song of Hiawatha' (1855).
NUADAmIrish Mythology
Possibly means "protector" in Celtic. In Irish myth he was an Irish god and a leader of the Tuatha De Danann. He was killed in battle against the Fomorii.
NUMITORmRoman Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Roman mythology Numitor was the king of Alba Longa and the father of Rhea Silvia. He was overthrown by his brother Amulius, but reinstated by his grandsons Romulus and Remus.
ODINmNorse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe. However Odin is most known from Norse mythology, as the highest of the gods, presiding over art, war, wisdom and death. He resided in Valhalla, where warriors went after they were slain.
OEDIPUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Οιδιπους (Oidipous), meaning "swollen foot" from οιδεω (oideo) "to swell" and πους (pous) "foot". In Greek mythology Oedipus was the son of the Theban king Laius and his wife Jocasta. Laius received a prophesy that he would be killed by his son, so he left the newborn to die of exposure. Oedipus was however rescued and raised in the home of the Corinthian king Polybus. After he had grown and learned of the same prophesy, Oedipus left Corinth so that he would not be a danger to Polybus, who he assumed was his father. On the road to Delphi he chanced upon his real father Laius and slew him in a petty disagreement, thus fulfilling the prophecy. He then correctly answered the Sphinx's riddle, winning the now vacant throne of Thebes and marrying the widowed Queen Jocasta, his own mother. Years later they learned the truth of their relationship, prompting Jocasta to commit suicide and Oedipus to blind himself.
OENONEfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Οινωνε (Oinone), derived from οινος (oinos) meaning "wine". In Greek mythology Oenone was a mountain nymph who was married to Paris before he went after Helen.
OKEANOSmGreek Mythology
From the name of the river or body of water thought by the ancient Greeks to surround the Earth. In Greek mythology Okeanos was the Titan who personified this body of water.
ORESTESmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ορεστιας (orestias) meaning "of the mountains". In Greek myth he was the son of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. He killed his mother and her lover Aegisthus after they killed his father.
ORPHEUSmGreek Mythology
Perhaps related to Greek ορφνη (orphne) meaning "the darkness of night". In Greek mythology Orpheus was a poet and musician who went to the underworld to retrieve his dead wife Eurydice. He succeeded in charming Hades with his lyre, and he was allowed to lead his wife out of the underworld on the condition that he not look back at her until they reached the surface. Unfortunately, just before they arrived his love for her overcame his will and he glanced back at her, causing her to be drawn back to Hades.
OSIRISmEgyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of the Egyptian Asar which is of unknown meaning. In Egyptian mythology Osiris was the god of the dead and the judge of the underworld. He was slain by his brother Seth, but revived by his wife Isis.
OURANIAfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek ουρανιος (ouranios) meaning "heavenly". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of astronomy and astrology, one of the nine Muses.
OVIDmHistory
From the Roman family name Ovidius, which was possibly derived from Latin ovis "a sheep". Alternatively, it could have a Sabellic origin. Publius Ovidius Naso, better known as Ovid, was a 1st-century BC Roman poet who often wrote on the subjects of love and mythology. He was sent into exile by Emperor Augustus for no apparent reason.
OWAINmWelsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though it might be derived from Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology. In Arthurian legend Owain (also called Yvain in French sources) was one of the Knights of the Round Table, the son of King Urien and husband of the Lady of the Fountain. His character was based on that of Owain ap Urien, a 6th-century Welsh prince who fought against the Angles. This name was also borne by Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century leader of Welsh resistance against English rule.
PALLAS (1)fGreek Mythology
Probably derived from a Greek word meaning "maiden". In Greek mythology this was the name of a friend of the goddess Athena. Athena accidentally killed her, and subsequently took the name Pallas in honour of her friend.
PALLAS (2)mGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek παλλω (pallo) "to brandish". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan and several other characters. It was also the name of a female character, though her name is probably from a different source (see Pallas).
PANmGreek Mythology
Possibly from an Indo-European root meaning "shepherd, protector". In Greek mythology Pan was a half-man, half-goat god associated with shepherds, flocks and pastures.
PANDORAfGreek Mythology
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.
PAPAfPolynesian Mythology
Means "earth" in Maori. In Maori and other Polynesian mythology Papa or Papatuanuku was the goddess of the earth and the mother of many of the other gods. She and her husband Rangi, the god of the sky, were locked in a tight embrace. Their children decided to separate them, a feat of strength accomplished by the god Tane.
PARIS (1)mGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Luwian or Hittite origin. In Greek mythology he was the Trojan prince who kidnapped Helen and began the Trojan War. Though presented as a somewhat of a coward in the 'Iliad', he did manage to slay the great hero Achilles. He was himself eventually slain in battle by Philoctetes.
PAXfRoman Mythology
Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.
PEGASUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Πηγασος (Pegasos), possibly either from πηγος (pegos) "strong" or πηγαιος (pegaios) "from a water spring". In Greek mythology Pegasus was the winged horse that sprang from the blood of Medusa after she was killed by Perseus. There is a constellation in the northern sky named after the horse.
PEREDURmWelsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Possibly means "hard spears" in Welsh. This was the name of several figures from Welsh mythology. It was later used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Arthurian tales. The character of Percival was probably based on him.
PERSEPHONEfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
PERSEUSmGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek περθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Perseus was a hero who was said to have founded the ancient city of Mycenae. He was the son of Zeus and Danaë. Mother and child were exiled by Danaë's father Acrisius, and Perseus was raised on the island of Seriphos. The king of the island compelled Perseus to kill the Gorgon Medusa, who was so ugly that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone. After obtaining winged sandals and other tools from the gods, he succeeded in his task by looking at Medusa in the reflection of his shield and slaying her in her sleep. On his return he defeated a sea monster in order to save Andromeda, who became his wife.
PERUNmSlavic Mythology
Means "thunder" in Slavic. In Slavic mythology Perun was the god of lightning, sometimes worshipped as the primary god. The oak was his sacred tree.
PHAEDRAfGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Φαιδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρος (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.
PHILOMELAfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and μηλον (melon) "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μελος (melos) "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.
PHOBOSmGreek Mythology
Means "fear, panic" in Greek. This was one of the sons of Ares in Greek mythology. Also, one of the moons of Mars bears this name.
PHOEBEfEnglish, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHOENIXm & fEnglish (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
PHRIXUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Φριξος (Phrixos) which meant "thrilling, causing shivers", derived from φριξ (phrix) "ripple, shiver". In Greek myth Phrixus was the son of Athamus and Nephele. He was to be sacrificed to Zeus, but he escaped with his sister Helle on the back of the ram with the Golden Fleece.
PHYLLISfGreek Mythology, English, German
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
PISTISfGreek Mythology
Means "trust, faith" in Greek. In Greek mythology Pistis was the personification of trust.
POLLUXmRoman Mythology
Roman form of Greek Πολυδευκης (Polydeukes) meaning "very sweet", from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and δευκης (deukes) "sweet". In mythology he was the twin brother of Castor and a son of Zeus. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
POLYMNIAfGreek Mythology
Means "abounding in song", derived from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and ‘υμνος (hymnos) "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.
POSEIDONmGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek ποσις (posis) "husband, lord" and δα (da) "earth". The name first appears in Mycenaean Greek inscriptions as po-se-da-o. In Greek mythology Poseidon was the unruly god of the sea and earthquakes, the brother of Zeus. He was often depicted carrying a trident and riding in a chariot drawn by white horses.
PROMETHEUSmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek προμηθεια (prometheia) meaning "foresight, forethought". In Greek myth he was the Titan who gave the knowledge of fire to mankind. For doing this he was punished by Zeus, who had him chained to a rock and caused an eagle to feast daily on his liver, which regenerated itself each night. Herakles eventually freed him.
PROTEUSmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek πρωτος (protos) meaning "first". In Greek mythology this was the name of a prophetic god of the sea.
PSYCHEfGreek Mythology
Means "the soul", derived from Greek ψυχω (psycho) "to breathe". The Greeks thought that the breath was the soul. In Greek mythology Psyche was a beautiful maiden who was beloved by Eros (or Cupid in Roman mythology). She is the subject of Keats's poem 'Ode to Psyche' (1819).
PWYLLmWelsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh mythology, Pwyll is a king of Dyfed who pursues and finally marries Rhiannon.
QUETZALCOATLmAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and coatl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
RAIJINmFar Eastern Mythology
From Japanese (rai) meaning "thunder" and (jin) meaning "god, spirit". This is the name of the god (or gods) of thunder and storms in the mythology of Japan.
RANGImMaori, Polynesian Mythology
Means "sky" in Maori. In Maori and other Polynesian mythology Rangi or Ranginui was a god of the sky, husband of the earth goddess Papa. They were locked in a crushing embrace but were eventually separated by their children, the other gods.
RHEAfGreek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Latinized form of Greek ‘Ρεια (Rheia), meaning unknown, perhaps related to ‘ρεω (rheo) "to flow" or ερα (era) "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
SADBfIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "sweet, goodly" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish mythology Sadb was the mother of Oisín.
SAMPOmFinnish, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Finnish mythology this is the name of a magical artifact (perhaps a mill) created by the smith god Ilmarinen.
SATURNmRoman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Saturnus, which is of unknown meaning. In Roman mythology he was the father of Jupiter, Juno and others, and was also the god of agriculture. This is also the name of the ringed sixth planet in the solar system.
SEMELEfGreek Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Phrygian origin. In Greek mythology she was one of the many lovers of Zeus. Hera, being jealous, tricked Semele into asking Zeus to display himself in all his splendour as the god of thunder. When he did, Semele was struck by lightning and died, but not before giving birth to Dionysos.
SIGMUNDmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SIMON (2)mAncient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek σιμος (simos) meaning "flat-nosed". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the Telchines, demigods who were the original inhabitants of Rhodes.
SIVfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Means "bride" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology Siv was the wife of Thor.
SKAÐIfNorse Mythology
Means "damage, harm" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology she was a mountain giantess associated with the winter and skiing, the wife of Njord and later Odin.
SKULDfNorse Mythology
Means "future" in Old Norse. She was one of the three Norns, or goddesses of destiny, in Norse mythology. She was also one of the Valkyries.
SOSRUKOmCaucasian Mythology
Derived from Turkic suslä "menacing". This is the name of a trickster god in Caucasian mythology. He is the hero of the Nart sagas.
SVAROGmSlavic Mythology
Derived from Slavic svar "bright, clear". This was the name of the Slavic god of the sky and sun. He was originally the supreme god in Slavic mythology.
TANEmMaori, Polynesian Mythology
Means "man" in Maori. In Maori and other Polynesian mythology Tane was the god of forests and light. He was the son of the sky god Rangi and the earth goddess Papa, who were locked in an embrace and finally separated by their son. He created the tui bird and, by some accounts, man.
TANGAROAmPolynesian Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Polynesian mythology he was the god of the sea, the son of Rangi and Papa. He separated his parents' embrace, creating the earth and the sky.
TARUfFinnish
Means "legend, myth" in Finnish. It is also used as a diminutive of TARJA.
TERPSICHOREfGreek Mythology
Means "enjoying the dance" from Greek τερψις (terpsis) "delight" and χορος (choros) "dance". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and dramatic chorus, one of the nine Muses.
TETHYSfGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek τηθη (tethe) meaning "grandmother". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan associated with the sea. She was the wife of Oceanus.
TEZCATLIPOCAmAztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "smoking mirror" in Nahuatl. In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was one of the chief gods, associated with the night sky, winds, war, and the north. Like his rival Quetzalcoatl, he was a creator god.
THALIAfGreek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
From the Greek name Θαλεια (Thaleia), derived from θαλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).
THEIAfGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek θεα (thea) meaning "goddess". In Greek myth this was the name of a Titan goddess of sight, glittering and glory. She was the wife of Hyperion and the mother of the sun god Helios, the moon goddess Selene, and the dawn goddess Eos.
THEMISfGreek Mythology
Means "law of nature, divine law, that which is laid down" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan who presided over custom and natural law. She was often depicted blindfolded and holding a pair of scales. By Zeus she was the mother of many deities, including the three Μοιραι (Moirai) and the three ‘Ωραι (Horai).
THESEUSmGreek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek τιθημι (tithemi) meaning "to set, to place". Theseus was a heroic king of Athens in Greek mythology. He was the son of Aethra, either by Aegeus or by the god Poseidon. According to legend, every seven years the Cretan king Minos demanded that Athens supply Crete with seven boys and seven girls to be devoured by the Minotaur, a half-bull creature that was the son of Minos's wife Pasiphaë. Theseus volunteered to go in place of one of these youths in order to slay the Minotaur in the Labyrinth where it lived. He succeeded with the help of Minos's daughter Ariadne, who provided him with a sword and a roll of string so he could find his way out of the maze.
ÞÓRAfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Either a feminine form of Þórr (see THOR) or else a short form of the various Old Norse names beginning with the element Þór. In Norse myth Thora was the wife of the Danish king Ragnar Lodbrok.
THOTHmEgyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Djhwty (reconstructed as Djehuti), which is of uncertain meaning. In Egyptian mythology Thoth was the god of the moon, science, magic, speech and writing. He was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis.
TIAMATfSemitic Mythology
From Akkadian tâmtu meaning "sea". In Babylonian myth Tiamat was the personification of the sea, appearing in the form of a huge dragon. By Apsu she gave birth to the first of the gods. Later, the god Marduk (her great-grandson) defeated her, cut her in half, and used the pieces of her body to make the earth and the sky.
TISIPHONEfGreek Mythology
Means "avenging murder" in Greek, derived from τισις (tisis) "vengeance" and φονη (phone) "murder". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. She killed Cithaeron with the bite of one of the snakes on her head.
TYCHONmGreek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From Greek τυγχανω (tynchano) meaning "hit the mark, succeed". This was the name of a minor deity associated with Priapus in Greek mythology. It was also borne by a 5th-century saint from Cyprus.
TYRmNorse Mythology
Norse form of the name of the Germanic god Tiwaz, related to Indo-European dyeus (see ZEUS). In Norse mythology Tyr was the god of war and justice, the son of the god Odin. He carried a spear in his left hand, since his right hand was bitten off by the wolf Fenrir. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, Tyr will slay and be slain by the giant hound Garm.
UKKOmFinnish, Finnish Mythology
Means "old man" in Finnish. In Finnish mythology Ukko is the god of the sky and thunder.
URANUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ουρανος (Ouranos), the name of the husband of Gaia and the father of the Titans in Greek mythology. His name is derived from ουρανος (ouranos) meaning "the heavens". This is also the name of the seventh planet in the solar system.
URDfNorse Mythology
From the Old Norse Urðr meaning "fate". In Norse mythology Urd was one of the three Norns, or goddesses of destiny. She was responsible for the past.
UTUmSumerian Mythology
Derived from Sumerian 𒌓 (ud) meaning "sun". In Sumerian mythology this was the name of the god of the sun. He was the son of the moon god Nanna and Ningal.