Names with Relationship "from different language"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from different language.
Filter Results       more options...
BAPTISTEmFrench
Means "baptist" in French, originally deriving from Greek βαπτω (bapto) "to dip". This name is usually given in honour of Saint John the Baptist, and as such it is often paired with the name Jean.
BARABALfScottish
Scottish form of BARBARA.
BARAK (1)mHebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lightning" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament, Barak was a military commander under the guidance of the prophetess Deborah. They defeated the Canaanite army led by Sisera.
BÁRBARAfPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of BARBARA.
BARBARAfEnglish, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BARBAREfGeorgian
Georgian form of BARBARA.
BARBORAfCzech, Slovak, Lithuanian
Czech, Slovak and Lithuanian form of BARBARA.
BARBROfSwedish
Swedish form of BARBARA.
BARCLAYmScottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was likely derived from the English place name Berkeley, meaning "birch wood" in Old English.
BÅRDmNorwegian
Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Bárðr, which was derived from the elements baðu "battle" and friðr "peace".
BARNABÁSmHungarian
Hungarian form of BARNABAS.
BARNABASmGerman (Rare), English (Rare), Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of an Aramaic name. In Acts in the New Testament the byname Barnabas was given to a man named Joseph, a Jew from Cyprus who was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys. The original Aramaic form is unattested, but it may be from בּר נביא (bar naviya') meaning "son of the prophet", though in Acts 4:36 it is claimed that the name means "son of encouragement". As an English name, it came into occasional use after the 12th century.
BARNABÉmFrench
French form of BARNABAS.
BARNABYmEnglish (Archaic)
Medieval English form of BARNABAS.
BARRYmIrish, English
Anglicized form of BAIRRE. It is also sometimes used as an Anglicized form of BERACH.
BARTHOLOMEUSmDutch, Biblical Latin
Dutch and Latin form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTHOLOMEWmEnglish, Biblical
From Βαρθολομαιος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.
BARTOLOMEJmSlovak, Croatian (Rare)
Slovak and Croatian form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTOLOMEUmPortuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTOMEUmCatalan
Catalan form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARUCHmBiblical, Hebrew
Means "blessed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a companion of the prophet Jeremiah, acting as his scribe and assistant. The deuterocanonical Book of Baruch was supposedly written by him. A famous bearer was Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677), a Dutch-Jewish rationalist philosopher.
BASANTmIndian, Hindi
Modern form of VASANTA.
BASEMATHfBiblical, Biblical Latin
Means "fragrance" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a wife of Esau.
BASEMMATHfBiblical Greek
Form of BASEMATH and BASMATH used in the Greek Old Testament.
BASIL (1)mEnglish
From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios) which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
BASILEmFrench
French form of BASIL (1).
BASILIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of BASIL (1).
BASMATHfBiblical, Biblical Latin
Variant of BASEMATH. This was the name of a daughter of Solomon in the Old Testament.
BASUmBengali
Bengali form of VASU.
BATHSHEBAfBiblical
Means "daughter of the oath" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a woman married to Uriah the Hittite. King David seduced her and made her pregnant, so he arranged to have her husband killed in battle and then married her. She was the mother of Solomon.
BATRAZmOssetian, Caucasian Mythology
Possibly from Turkic bagatur meaning "hero, warrior, brave". This is the name of the leader of the superhuman Narts in Caucasian mythology.
BATTISTAmItalian
Italian form of BAPTISTE.
BAUDOUINmFrench
French form of BALDWIN.
BAUTISTAmSpanish
Spanish form of BAPTISTE.
BEATmGerman (Swiss)
Swiss German form of BEATUS.
BEÁTAfHungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of BEATA.
BEATAfPolish, German, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
BEATEfGerman, Norwegian, Danish
German form of BEATA.
BÉATRICEfFrench
French form of BEATRIX.
BEATRICEfItalian, English, Swedish
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the 'Divine Comedy' (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BEATRISEfLatvian
Latvian form of BEATRIX.
BEATRIUfCatalan
Catalan form of BEATRIX.
BEATRIXfGerman, Hungarian, Dutch, English, Late Roman
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed, happy". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.... [more]
BEATRIZfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of BEATRIX.
BEATRYCZEfPolish
Polish form of BEATRIX.
BEDŘICHmCzech
Czech form of FREDERICK.
BEHİYEfTurkish
Turkish form of BAHIYYA.
BEHRAMmTurkish
Turkish form of BAHRAM.
BEITRISfScottish
Scottish form of BEATRICE.
BĚLAfCzech
Derived from the old Slavic word белъ (belu) meaning "white".
BELImWelsh Mythology
Probably a Welsh derivative of BELENUS. Beli Mawr was a Welsh ancestor deity who established several royal lines in Wales.
BELIALmBiblical, Biblical Latin, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "worthless" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this term is used to refer to various wicked people. In the New Testament, Paul uses it as a name for Satan. In later Christian tradition Belial became an evil angel associated with lawlessness and lust.
BELSHATZZARmBiblical Hebrew
Form of BELSHAZZAR found in the Hebrew Bible.
BELSHAZZARmAncient Near Eastern, Biblical
From בֵּלְשַׁאצַּר (Belshatzzar), the Hebrew form of the Akkadian name Bel-sarra-usur meaning "BA'AL protect the king". This was the name of the son of Nabonidus, the last king of the Babylonian Empire before it was conquered by the Persians in the 6th century BC. In the Old Testament Book of Daniel Belshazzar is the last king of Babylon who sees the mystical handwriting on the wall, which is interpreted by Daniel to portend the end of the empire.
BENAIAHmBiblical
From the Hebrew name בְּנָיָהוּ (Benayahu) meaning "YAHWEH has built". This is the name of numerous Old Testament characters.
BEÑATmBasque
Basque form of BERNARD.
BENCEmHungarian
Hungarian form of VINCENT. It is also used as a short form of BENEDEK.
BENDEGÚZmHungarian
Hungarian variant of the Turkic name Mundzuk, possibly from mončuq meaning "jewel, bead". This was the name of Attila the Hun's father.
BENDIKSmLatvian
Latvian form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENDTmDanish
Danish form of BENEDICT.
BENEDEKmHungarian
Hungarian form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDETTAfItalian
Italian feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENEDETTOmItalian
Italian form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDICTmEnglish
From the Late Latin name Benedictus which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American general Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who defected to Britain during the American Revolution.
BÉNÉDICTEfFrench
French feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENEDICTUSmLate Roman, Dutch
Original Latin form of BENEDICT, as well as the modern Dutch form.
BENEDIKTmGerman, Russian, Icelandic, Czech
Form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDIKTAfGerman (Rare)
German feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENEDIKTASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDIKTEfDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENEDITAfPortuguese
Portuguese feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENEDITOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDYKTmPolish
Polish form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENEDYKTAfPolish
Polish feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENESHmYiddish
Yiddish form of BENEDICT.
BENGTmSwedish
Swedish form of BENEDICT.
BENIAMINmRomanian, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Romanian form of BENJAMIN, as well as the form used in the Greek and Latin Bibles.
BENIAMINOmItalian
Italian form of BENJAMIN.
BENIGNOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of the Late Latin name Benignus which meant "kind, friendly" in Latin. This was the name of several saints including a 5th-century disciple of Saint Patrick who later became the chief Bishop of Ireland.
BENITAfSpanish
Feminine form of BENITO.
BENITOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish form of BENEDICT. This name was borne by Mexican president Benito Juárez, and also by Benito Mussolini (who was named after Juárez), the fascist dictator of Italy during World War II.
BENJAMIMmPortuguese
Portuguese form of BENJAMIN.
BENJÁMINmHungarian
Hungarian form of BENJAMIN.
BENJAMÍNmSpanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic
Spanish, Czech, Slovak and Icelandic form of BENJAMIN.
BENJAMINmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּןְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand", from the roots בֵּן (ben) meaning "son" and יָמִין (yamin) meaning "right hand, south". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oni) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
BENJAMINASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of BENJAMIN.
BENNETTmEnglish
Medieval form of BENEDICT. This was the more common spelling in England until the 18th century. Modern use of the name is probably also influenced by the common surname Bennett, itself a derivative of the medieval name.
BENOÎTmFrench
French form of BENEDICT.
BENOÎTEfFrench
French feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENT (1)mDanish
Danish form of BENEDICT.
BENT (2)mFrisian
Frisian variant of BEN (2).
BENTEfDanish, Norwegian, Dutch
Danish feminine form of BENEDICT.
BERARDOmItalian
Italian form of BERARD.
BÉRENGERmFrench
French form of BERENGAR.
BERENGUERmCatalan
Catalan form of BERENGAR.
BÉRÉNICEfFrench
French form of BERENICE.
BERENICEfEnglish, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βερενικη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενικη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φερω (phero) "to bring" and νικη (nike) "victory". This name was common among the Ptolemy ruling family of Egypt, a dynasty which was originally from Macedon. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament (in most English Bibles it is spelled Bernice) belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II. As an English name, Berenice came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
BERGLJÓTfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BERGLJOT.
BERGLJOTfNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Bergljót, which was composed of the elements berg "protection, help" and ljótr "light".
BERISLAVmCroatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements birati "to take, to gather" (in an inflected form) and slava "glory".
BERNADETTfHungarian
Hungarian form of BERNADETTE.
BERNADETTEfFrench, English
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.
BERNARDmEnglish, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERNARDOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of BERNARD.
BERNÁTmHungarian
Hungarian form of BERNARD.
BERNATmCatalan
Catalan form of BERNARD.
BERNHARDmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of BERNARD.
BERNICEfEnglish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Contracted form of BERENICE. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II.
BERTALANmHungarian
Hungarian form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BERTHAfGerman, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
BERTHEfFrench
French form of BERTHA.
BERTHOLDmGerman
Means "bright ruler" from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with wald "rule".
BERTILmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of BERTILO or BERTHOLD.
BERTOLDOmItalian
Italian form of BERTHOLD.
BERTRAMmEnglish, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play 'All's Well That Ends Well' (1603).
BERTRANDmFrench, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with BERTRAM and the two names have merged to some degree. A famous bearer was English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
BERTRANDOmItalian
Italian form of BERTRAND.
BESARIONmGeorgian
Georgian form of BESSARION.
BETfFrisian, Limburgish
Frisian and Limburgish short form of ELISABETH.
BETHANfWelsh
Welsh diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETHARIfIndonesian, Javanese
Javanese form of BATARI.
BETHUELmBiblical
Possibly means "God destroys" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the father of Rebecca.
BETRYSfWelsh
Welsh form of BEATRICE.
BETÜLfTurkish
Turkish form of BATUL.
BEULAHfBiblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Means "married" in Hebrew. The name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the land of Israel (Isaiah 62:4). As an English given name, Beulah has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
BHALTAIRmScottish
Scottish form of WALTER.
BHARATmIndian, Hindi, Marathi
Modern form of BHARATA.
BHARATHmTamil, Indian, Malayalam, Telugu
Southern Indian form of BHARATA.
BHÀTAIRmScottish
Scottish form of WALTER.
BIAGIOmItalian
Italian form of BLAISE.
BIANCAfItalian, Romanian
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).
BIANKAfGerman, Hungarian, Polish
German, Hungarian and Polish form of BIANCA.
BIBIANAfItalian, Spanish, Late Roman
Possibly an early variant of VIVIANA. Alternatively, it may be a feminine derivative of the earlier Roman cognomen VIBIANUS.
BIEITOmGalician
Galician form of BENEDICT.
BIJAYmBengali
Bengali form of VIJAYA.
BIKENDImBasque
Basque form of VINCENT.
BILAfBiblical Italian
Italian form of BILHAH.
BİLALmTurkish
Turkish form of BILAL.
BILALmArabic, Urdu
Means "wetting, moistening" in Arabic. This was the name of a companion of the Prophet Muhammad.
BILEmIrish Mythology
Possibly an Irish form of BELENUS, though it may derive from an Irish word meaning "hero". In Irish mythology this was the name of one of the Milesians who was drowned while invading Ireland.
BILHAfBiblical German, Biblical French, Biblical Spanish, Biblical Dutch
German, French, Spanish and Dutch form of BILHAH.
BILHAHfBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "bashful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the handmaid given to Jacob by his wife Rachel. By him she was the mother of Dan and Naphtali.
BIMAmIndonesian
Indonesian form of BHIMA.
BINYAMINmHebrew, Arabic, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew and Arabic form of BENJAMIN.
BIRGERmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Birgir, probably derived from bjarga meaning "help, save, rescue".
BIRGIRmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BIRGER.
BIRGITfDanish, Swedish, Norwegian, German
Scandinavian variant of BIRGITTA.
BIRGITTAfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish
Most likely a Scandinavian form of BRIDGET via the Latinized form Brigitta. Alternatively it could be a feminine derivative of BIRGER. This is the name of the patron saint of Europe, Birgitta of Sweden, the 14th-century founder of the Bridgettine nuns. Her father's name was Birger.
BIRITAfFaroese
Faroese form of BRIDGET.
BITHIAHfBiblical
Means "daughter of YAHWEH" in Hebrew, from the roots בַּת (bat) meaning "daughter" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is the name of a daughter of Pharaoh. She is traditionally equated with the pharaoh's daughter who drew Moses from the Nile.
BITTORmBasque
Basque form of VICTOR.
BJARNImAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse diminutive of BJÖRN and other names containing the element björn meaning "bear".
BJARTEmNorwegian
From the Old Norse byname Bjartr, which meant "bright".
BJARTURmIcelandic
Icelandic form of Bjartr (see BJARTE).
BJÖRGfAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BJØRG.
BJØRGfNorwegian
Derived from Old Norse björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
BJÖRNmSwedish, Icelandic, German, Ancient Scandinavian
From an Old Norse byname meaning "bear".
BJØRNmNorwegian, Danish
Danish and Norwegian form of BJÖRN.
BLAANIDfManx
Manx form of BLÁTHNAT.
BLAISEmFrench
From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).
BLANCHEfFrench, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
BLANDINEfFrench
French form of the Roman name Blandina, which was the feminine form of Blandinus, which was itself a derivative of the cognomen BLANDUS. Saint Blandina was a 2nd-century slave from Lyons who was martyred by being thrown to wild beasts.
BLASmSpanish
Spanish form of BLAISE.
BLAŽmSlovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of BLAISE. It may also be derived from the Slavic element blagu meaning "sweet, pleasant, blessed".
BLAZEmEnglish (Modern)
Modern variant of BLAISE influenced by the English word blaze.
BŁAŻEJmPolish
Polish form of BLAISE.
BLAŽEJmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of BLAISE.
BLAZHEmMacedonian
Derived from the Slavic element blagu meaning "sweet, pleasant, blessed".
BO (1)mSwedish, Danish
From the Old Norse byname Búi which was derived from Old Norse bua meaning "to live".
BOAZmBiblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "swiftness" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the man who marries Ruth.
BODEmLow German
From the Germanic element bodo meaning "command, order".
BODILfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Bóthildr, derived from bót "remedy" and hildr "battle".
BOELEmDutch
Possibly a Dutch form of BALDO.
BOGDANmPolish, Russian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Romanian, Medieval Slavic
Means "given by God" from the Slavic elements bogu "god" and dan "given".
BOGOMILmBulgarian, Macedonian
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of BOGUMIŁ.
BOGOMIRmSlovene
Slovene form of BOHUMÍR.
BOGUMIŁmPolish
Means "favoured by God" from the Slavic elements bogu "god" and milu "gracious, dear".
BOGUSŁAWmPolish
Means "glory of God" from the Slavic elements bogu "god" and slava "glory". This name was borne by several dukes of Pomerania, beginning in the 12th century.
BOHDANmCzech, Ukrainian
Czech and Ukrainian form of BOGDAN.
BOHUMILmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of BOGUMIŁ.
BOHUMÍRmCzech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic element bogu "god" combined with meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
BOHUSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Ukrainian
Czech, Slovak and Ukrainian form of BOGUSŁAW.
BOJANmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic element boji meaning "battle". This was the name of a 9th-century Bulgarian saint.
BOLDIZSÁRmHungarian
Hungarian form of BALTHAZAR.
BOLESLAVmCzech, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Czech and Russian form of BOLESŁAW.
BOLESŁAWmPolish
Derived from the Slavic elements bolye "more, greater" and slava "glory". This was the name of kings of Poland, starting in the 11th century with the first Polish king Bolesław the Brave.
BONIFAASmDutch
Dutch form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BONIFÁCmCzech (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Czech and Hungarian form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BONIFACEmFrench, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Bonifatius, which meant "good fate" from bonum "good" and fatum "fate". This was the name of nine popes and also several saints, including an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary to Germany (originally named Winfrid) who is now regarded as the patron saint of that country. It came into use in England during the Middle Ages, but became rare after the Protestant Reformation.
BONIFACIOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BONIFACYmPolish
Polish form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BONIFAZmGerman (Rare)
German form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BOOSmBiblical Greek
Form of BOAZ used in the Greek Old Testament.
BOOZmBiblical Latin
Form of BOAZ used in the Latin Old Testament.
BORBÁLAfHungarian
Hungarian variant of BARBARA.
BORGHILDfNorwegian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Old Norse elements borg "fortification" and hildr "battle". In Norse mythology she was the wife of Sigmund.
BORGHILDURfIcelandic
Icelandic form of BORGHILD.
BORISmBulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BORISLAVmBulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element borti "battle" combined with slava "glory".
BOŘIVOJmCzech
Derived from the Slavic elements borti "battle" and voji "soldier". This name was borne by a 9th-century duke of Bohemia.
BORIVOJmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of BOŘIVOJ.
BORIVOJEmSerbian
Serbian form of BOŘIVOJ.
BORKOmCroatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic element borti meaning "fight, battle".
BORNAm & fCroatian
Derived from the Slavic element borti meaning "fight, battle".
BORYSmPolish, Ukrainian
Polish and Ukrainian form of BORIS.
BOTROSmArabic, Coptic
Variant transcription of BUTRUS.
BOUDEWIJNmDutch
Dutch form of BALDWIN.
BOUTROSmArabic, Coptic
Variant transcription of BUTRUS.
BOYANmBulgarian
Bulgarian form of BOJAN.
BOYANAfBulgarian
Bulgarian form of BOJANA.
BOYKOmBulgarian
Originally a diminutive of names containing the Slavic element boji meaning "battle".
BOŽENAfCzech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from the Slavic element bozy meaning "divine".
BOŻENAfPolish
Polish cognate of BOŽENA.
BOZHIDARmBulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of BOŽIDAR.
BOŽIDARmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene
Means "divine gift" from the Slavic elements bozy "divine" and daru "gift".
BOŽOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Originally a diminutive of BOŽIDAR and other names beginning with the Slavic element bozy meaning "divine".
BOŻYDARmPolish
Polish cognate of BOŽIDAR.
BRAAMmDutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of ABRAHAM.
BRAISmGalician
Galician form of BLAISE.
BRANIMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element borna "protection" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
BRÁSmPortuguese
Portuguese form of BLAISE.
BRATISLAVmSerbian
Derived from the Slavic elements bratu "brother" and slava "glory".
BRATUMIŁmPolish (Rare)
Derived from the Slavic elements bratu "brother" and milu "gracious, dear".
BRECHTmDutch
Short form of names containing brecht, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BREESHEYfManx
Manx form of BRIDGET.
BREIXOmGalician
Galician form of VERÍSSIMO.
BRENDAfEnglish
Possibly a feminine form of the Old Norse name Brandr, meaning "sword", which was brought to Britain in the Middle Ages. This name is sometimes used as a feminine form of BRENDAN.
BRENDANmIrish, English
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRENOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of BRENNUS.
BRIANmEnglish, Irish, Ancient Irish
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.
BRICEmFrench, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
BRIDGETfIrish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BRÍGIDAfPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of BRIDGET.
BRIGIDAfItalian
Italian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITAfSlovene, Croatian, Latvian
Slovene, Croatian and Latvian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITTAfGerman, Dutch, Hungarian
German, Dutch and Hungarian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITTEfGerman, French
German and French form of BRIDGET.
BROENmLimburgish
Limburgish form of BRUNO.
BRONISŁAWmPolish
Derived from the Slavic elements borna "protection" and slava "glory". A famous Polish anthropologist, Bronisław Malinowski (1884-1942), has borne this name.
BRONISLOVASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of BRONISŁAW.
BROOSmDutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of AMBROOS.
BRÜNHILDfGerman, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements brun "armour, protection" and hild "battle". It is cognate with the Old Norse name Brynhildr (from the elements bryn and hildr). In Norse legend Brynhildr was the queen of the Valkyries who was rescued by the hero Sigurd. In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' she was a queen of Iceland and the wife of Günther. Both of these characters were probably inspired by the eventful life of the 6th-century Frankish queen Brunhilda (of Visigothic birth).
BRUNILDAfSpanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of BRÜNHILD.
BRUNOmGerman, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
BRYGIDAfPolish
Polish form of BRIDGET.
BRYNHILDRfNorse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of BRÜNHILD. In the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga' Brynhildr was rescued by the hero Sigurd in the guise of Gunnar. Brynhildr and Gunnar were married, but when Sigurd's wife Gudrun let slip that it was in fact Sigurd who had rescued her, Brynhildr plotted against him. She accused Sigurd of taking her virginity, spurring Gunnar to arrange Sigurd's murder.
BRYNHILDURfIcelandic
Icelandic form of BRYNHILDR.
BRYNJAfIcelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
BRYNJARmNorwegian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements bryn "armour" and arr "warrior".
BRYNNfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BRYNNEfEnglish (Rare)
Feminine variant of BRYN.
BULUSmArabic
Arabic form of PAUL.
BÜNYAMİNmTurkish
Turkish form of BENJAMIN.
BURHANmArabic, Turkish
Means "proof" in Arabic.
BURKHARDmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements burg meaning "protection" and hard "brave, hardy". Saint Burkhard was a bishop who founded several monasteries in Germany in the 8th century.
BUTRUSmArabic, Coptic
Arabic form of PETER.
CÄCILIAfGerman
German form of CECILIA.
CÄCILIEfGerman
German form of CECILIA.
CADERINAfSardinian
Sardinian form of KATHERINE.
CADOGANmWelsh, Irish
Anglicized form of CADWGAN.
CAECILIAfGerman, Ancient Roman
German form of CECILIA, as well as the original Latin form.
CAELANm & fEnglish (Rare)
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN or CAOILFHIONN.
CAETANOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
CAFERmTurkish
Turkish form of JAFAR.
ÇAĞATAYmTurkish
From the Mongolian name Tsagadai (of unknown meaning), which was borne by the second son of Genghis Khan, known as Chagatai in English.
CAILEANmScottish
Means "whelp, young dog" in Gaelic. This name is also used as a Scottish form of COLUMBA.
CAINmBiblical, Biblical Latin
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
Previous Page      1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  ...  26      Next Page         7,781 results (this is page 4 of 26)