Names with Relationship "from different language"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from different language.
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LANAfEnglish, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).
LANCEmEnglish
From the Germanic name Lanzo, originally a short form of names that began with the element land meaning "land". During the Middle Ages it became associated with Old French lance "spear, lance". A famous bearer is American cyclist Lance Armstrong (1971-).
LANDOmItalian
Italian form of Lanzo (see LANCE).
LÁRAfIcelandic
Icelandic form of LAURA.
LARA (1)fRussian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LARImFinnish
Finnish diminutive of LAURENCE (1) or HILARIUS.
LARISAfRussian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Latvian, Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from the name of the ancient city of Larisa in Thessaly, which meant "citadel". In Greek legends, the nymph Larisa was either a daughter or mother of Pelasgus, the ancestor of the mythical Pelasgians. This name was later borne by a 4th-century Greek martyr who is venerated as a saint in the Eastern Church. The name (of the city, nymph and saint) is commonly Latinized as Larissa, with a double s.
LARISSAfEnglish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant of LARISA. It has been commonly used as an English given name only since the 20th century. In 1991 this name was given to one of the moons of Neptune, in honour of the mythological character.
LÁRUSmIcelandic
Icelandic form of LAURENCE (1).
LARYSAfUkrainian
Ukrainian form of LARISA.
LASSEmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Scandinavian and Finnish form of LAURENCE (1).
LÁSZLÓmHungarian
Hungarian form of VLADISLAV. Saint László was an 11th-century king of Hungary, looked upon as the embodiment of Christian virtue and bravery.
LATİFEfTurkish
Turkish feminine form of LATIF.
LAUmDutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of LAURENS.
LAUMAfLatvian, Baltic Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Latvian mythology this is the name of a forest spirit sometimes associated with childbirth and weaving.
LAURAfEnglish, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LAUREfFrench
French form of LAURA.
LAURENCE (1)mEnglish
From the Roman cognomen Laurentius, which meant "from Laurentum". Laurentum was a city in ancient Italy, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus "laurel". Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome. According to tradition he was roasted alive on a gridiron because, when ordered to hand over the church's treasures, he presented the sick and poor. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in the Christian world (in various spellings).... [more]
LAURENCE (2)fFrench
French feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURENSmDutch
Dutch form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURENTmFrench
French form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURENȚIUmRomanian
Romanian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURENZmGerman
German form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURImFinnish
Finnish form of LAURENCE (1).
LAURITSmDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURITZmDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAUROmItalian
Italian form of Laurus (see LAURA).
LAURYNASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAVINIAfRoman Mythology, Romanian
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
LAVRAfSlovene
Slovene form of LAURA.
LAVRENTIOSmGreek
Greek form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAVRENTIYmRussian
Russian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAWRENCEmEnglish
Variant of LAURENCE (1). This spelling of the name is now more common than Laurence in the English-speaking world, probably because Lawrence is the usual spelling of the surname. The surname was borne by the author and poet D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930), as well as the revolutionary T. E. Lawrence (1888-1935), who was known as Lawrence of Arabia.
LAXMIf & mIndian, Telugu, Marathi, Hindi, Nepali
Variant transcription of LAKSHMI.
LAYLAfArabic, English
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
LÁZÁRmHungarian
Hungarian form of LAZARUS.
LAZARmRussian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian form of LAZARUS.
LAZAREmFrench
French form of LAZARUS.
LÁZAROmSpanish
Spanish form of LAZARUS.
LAZARUSmBiblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of Λαζαρος (Lazaros), a Greek form of ELEAZAR used in the New Testament. Lazarus was a man from Bethany, the brother of Mary and Martha, who was restored to life by Jesus.
LAZERmYiddish
Yiddish form of ELIEZER.
LAZZAROmItalian
Italian form of LAZARUS.
LÉAfFrench
French form of LEAH.
LEAHfEnglish, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's sister Rachel. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.
LÉANfIrish
Irish form of HELEN.
LÉANDREmFrench
French form of LEANDER.
LEANDROmSpanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LEANDER.
LECHmPolish, Slavic Mythology
From the name of the Slavic tribe the Lendians, called the Lędzianie in Polish. According to Slavic legend this was the name of the founder of the Polish people. A famous bearer was the Polish president Lech Wałęsa (1943-).
LEEVImFinnish
Finnish form of LEVI.
LEHImBiblical, Mormon
From an Old Testament place name meaning "jawbone" in Hebrew. It is also used in the Book of Mormon as the name of a prophet.
LEIAfBiblical Greek, Popular Culture
Form of LEAH used in the Greek Old Testament. This is the name of a princess in the 'Star Wars' movies by George Lucas, who probably based it on Leah.
LEIFmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendant, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.
LEIFURmIcelandic
Icelandic form of LEIF.
LEILAfArabic, Persian, English, Georgian
Variant of LAYLA. This spelling was used by Lord Byron for characters in 'The Giaour' (1813) and 'Don Juan' (1819), and it is through him that the name was introduced to the English-speaking world.
LEIVmNorwegian
Norwegian variant of LEIF.
LĖJAfLithuanian
Lithuanian form of LEAH.
LEJLAfBosnian
Bosnian form of LAYLA.
LELIAfItalian
Italian form of LAELIA.
LELIOmItalian
Italian form of Laelius (see LAELIA).
LEMUELmBiblical, Mormon, Biblical Hebrew
Means "belonging to God" in Hebrew. This was the name of a king briefly mentioned in Proverbs in the Old Testament. In the Book of Mormon it is the name of a son of Lehi and Sariah. It is also borne by the hero of Jonathan Swift's novel 'Gulliver's Travels' (1726).
LENARTmSlovene
Slovene form of LEONARD.
LENNARTmSwedish, Danish, Norwegian, Low German, Dutch
Swedish and Low German form of LEONARD.
LENNONmScottish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of the Irish surname Ó Leannáin, which means "descendant of Leannán". The name Leannán means "lover" in Gaelic. This surname was borne by musician John Lennon (1940-1980), a member of the Beatles.
LÉOmFrench
French form of LEO.
LEOmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEOCÁDIAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of LEOCADIA.
LEOCADIAfSpanish, Late Roman
Late Latin name which might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκος (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
LEOCADIOmSpanish
Masculine form of LEOCADIA.
LEOKADIAfPolish
Polish form of LEOCADIA.
LÉONmFrench
French form of LEON.
LEÓNmSpanish
Spanish form of LEON. León is also the name of a province in Spain, though the etymology is unrelated.
LEONmEnglish, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LÉONARDmFrench
French form of LEONARD.
LEONARDmEnglish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements levon "lion" and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, though it did not become common there until the 19th century.
LEONARDOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is also known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the 'Mona Lisa'. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
LEONASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of LEON.
LÉONCEmFrench
French form of LEONTIOS.
LEONCIOmSpanish
Spanish form of LEONTIOS.
LEONE (1)mItalian
Italian form of LEON.
LEONHARDmGerman
German form of LEONARD. Leonhard Euler was a Swiss mathematician who made many important contributions to calculus, number theory, geometry and theoretical physics.
LEONIDmRussian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of LEONIDAS.
LEONIDAmItalian
Italian form of LEONIDAS.
LÉONIDEm & fFrench (Rare)
French masculine and feminine form of LEONIDAS.
LÉONIEfFrench
French feminine form of LEONIUS.
LEONIEfGerman, Dutch
German and Dutch feminine form of LEONIUS.
LEONORfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of ELEANOR. It was brought to Spain in the 12th-century by Eleanor of England, who married king Alfonso VIII of Castile.
LÉONTINEfFrench
French form of LEONTINA.
LEONTIYmRussian
Russian form of LEONTIOS.
LEONTYNEfEnglish (Rare)
Variant of LÉONTINE. This name was borne by opera singer Leontyne Price (1927-).
LEONZIOmItalian
Italian form of LEONTIOS.
LÉOPOLDmFrench
French form of LEOPOLD.
LEOPOLDmGerman, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).
LEOPOLDOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEOPOLD.
LEOŠmCzech
Czech form of LEO.
LERmIrish Mythology
Irish cognate of LLYR. Ler was an Irish god of the sea, the father of Manannan mac Lir.
LETÍCIAfPortuguese, Hungarian
Portuguese and Hungarian form of LETITIA.
LETICIAfSpanish
Spanish form of LETITIA.
LETITIAfEnglish
From the Late Latin name Laetitia which meant "joy, happiness". This was the name of an obscure saint, who is revered mainly in Spain. It was in use in England during the Middle Ages, usually in the spelling Lettice, and it was revived in the 18th century.
LETIZIAfItalian
Italian form of LETITIA. It was borne by Napoleon Bonaparte's mother.
LEUImBiblical Greek
Form of LEVI used in the Greek Bible.
LEVANmGeorgian
Georgian form of LEON.
LEVImHebrew, English, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. In the New Testament this is another name for the apostle Matthew. As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
LEVONmArmenian
Armenian form of LEON. This was the name of several kings of Cilician Armenia, including the first king Levon I the Magnificent.
LEWISmEnglish
Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the 'Chronicles of Narnia'.
LHAMOf & mTibetan, Bhutanese
Means "goddess" in Tibetan.
LÍAfGalician
Galician form of LEAH.
LIA (1)fItalian, Portuguese, Georgian, Greek, Biblical Latin
Italian, Portuguese, Georgian and Greek form of LEAH.
LIAMmIrish, English
Irish short form of WILLIAM.
LIBORmCzech
Czech form of LIBERIUS.
LIBORIOmItalian
Italian form of LIBORIUS.
LÍDIAfPortuguese, Catalan, Hungarian
Portuguese, Catalan and Hungarian form of LYDIA.
LIDIAfPolish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian
Polish, Italian, Spanish and Romanian form of LYDIA.
LIDIJAfSlovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Slovene, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian form of LYDIA.
LIDIYAfRussian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of LYDIA.
LIEVENmFlemish
Flemish form of LEOBWIN.
LIEVINmFlemish
Flemish form of LEOBWIN.
LÍGIAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of LIGEIA.
LILEASfScottish
Scottish form of LILLIAN.
LILIfGerman, French, Hungarian
German, French and Hungarian diminutive of ELISABETH, also sometimes connected to the German word lilie meaning "lily". In Hungarian, it can also be diminutive of KAROLINA or JÚLIA.
LÍLIANfPortuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese variant of LILLIAN.
LILIÁNAfHungarian
Hungarian form of LILLIAN.
LILIANEfFrench
French form of LILLIAN.
LILIASfScottish
Scottish form of LILLIAN.
LILITAfLatvian
Latvian form of LILITH.
LILITHfNear Eastern Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
LILLIASfScottish
Scottish form of LILLIAN.
LILLYfEnglish, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
English variant of LILY. It is also used in Scandinavia, as a form of LILY or a diminutive of ELISABETH.
LINASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of LINUS. This is also the Lithuanian word for "flax" (a cognate of the name's root).
LINDAfEnglish, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LINOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, Galician
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Galician form of LINUS.
LINUSmGreek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.
LIONELmFrench, English
French diminutive of LÉON. A notable bearer is Argentine soccer star Lionel Messi (1987-).
LISANDROmSpanish
Spanish form of LYSANDER.
LIUCIJAfLithuanian
Lithuanian form of LUCIA.
LIUDVIKASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of LUDWIG.
LIÙSAIDHfScottish
Scottish form of LUCIA.
LIV (1)fSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from the Old Norse name Hlíf meaning "protection". Its use has been influenced by the modern Scandinavian word liv meaning "life".
LÍVIAfPortuguese, Hungarian, Slovak
Portuguese, Hungarian and Slovak form of LIVIA (1).
LIVIA (1)fItalian, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LIVIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus.
LIVIANAfItalian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name LIVIUS.
LIVIEfFrench, Czech
French and Czech feminine form of LIVIUS.
LIVIOmItalian
Italian form of LIVIUS.
LIVIUmRomanian
Romanian form of LIVIUS.
LIWIAfPolish
Polish form of LIVIA (1).
LJUBAfSerbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovene, Macedonian
From the Slavic element lyuby meaning "love".
LJUBANmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of LYUBEN.
LJUBENmMacedonian
Macedonian form of LYUBEN.
LJUBOMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian form of LUBOMÍR.
LJUDMILmMacedonian
Macedonian masculine form of LUDMILA.
LJUDMILAfSlovene
Slovene form of LUDMILA.
LLEUmWelsh Mythology
Probably a Welsh form of LUGUS. In the Mabinogion, Lleu Llaw Gyffes is the son of Arianrhod. He was raised by his uncle Gwydion, who helped him overcome the curses that his mother placed upon him.
LLEUCUfWelsh
Welsh form of LUCIA.
LLORENÇmCatalan
Catalan form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LLUCmCatalan
Catalan form of LUKE.
LLÚCIAfCatalan
Catalan form of LUCIA.
LLUÍSmCatalan
Catalan form of LOUIS.
LLUÏSAfCatalan
Catalan feminine form of LOUIS.
LLYWELYNmWelsh
Possibly a Welsh form of the old Celtic name Lugubelenus, a combination of the names of the gods LUGUS and BELENUS. Alternatively it may be derived from Welsh llyw "leader". This was the name of several Welsh rulers, notably the 13th-century Llywelyn the Great who fought against England.
LOANmFrench
Variant of ELOUAN.
LOCHLAINNmIrish
Irish form of LACHLAN.
LOCHLANNmIrish
Irish form of LACHLAN.
LODEWIJKmDutch
Dutch form of LUDWIG.
LODOVICOmItalian
Italian form of LUDWIG.
LOÏCmFrench, Breton
Breton form of LOUIS.
LOIDAfSpanish
Spanish form of LOIS (1).
LOÍSmOccitan
Occitan form of LOUIS.
LOIS (1)fEnglish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly derived from Greek λωιων (loion) meaning "more desirable" or "better". Lois is mentioned in the New Testament as the mother of Eunice and the grandmother of Timothy. As an English name, it came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In fiction, this is the name of the girlfriend of the comic book hero Superman.
LOIS (2)mGalician
Galician form of LOUIS.
LOKEmNorse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of LOKI.
LOLAfSpanish, English
Diminutive of DOLORES.
LONmEnglish
Short form of ALONZO and other names containing the same sound. Famous bearers were American actors Lon Chaney Sr. (1883-1930) and Lon Chaney Jr. (1906-1973). The elder's birth name was Leonidas.
LONGINmPolish
Polish form of LONGINUS.
LONNIEmEnglish
Short form of ALONZO and other names containing the same sound.
LONNYmEnglish
Short form of ALONZO and other names containing the same sound.
LOPEmSpanish
Spanish form of Lupus (see LOUP).
LORmLimburgish
Limburgish short form of LAURENS.
LORÁNDmHungarian
Hungarian form of ROLAND.
LÓRÁNTmHungarian
Hungarian form of ROLAND.
LOREDANAfItalian, Romanian
Used by the French author George Sand for a character in her novel 'Mattea' (1833) and later by the Italian author Luciano Zuccoli in his novel 'L'amore de Loredana' (1908). It was possibly based on the Venetian surname Loredan, which was derived from the place name Loreo.
LORENA (1)fSpanish, Portuguese, Italian, Croatian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LORRAINE.
LORENCIOmMedieval Spanish
Archaic Spanish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LORENSmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of LAURENCE (1).
LORENZmGerman
German form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LORENZAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LORENZOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)). Lorenzo de' Medici (1449-1492), known as the Magnificent, was a ruler of Florence during the Renaissance. He was also a great patron of the arts who employed Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and other famous artists.
LŐRINCmHungarian
Hungarian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOT (1)mBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "covering, veil" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a nephew of Abraham. Before Sodom was destroyed by God, he was directed to flee the city without looking back. However, his wife looked back on the destruction and was turned into a pillar of salt.
LOTARIOmItalian
Italian form of LOTHAR.
LOTHAIREmFrench
French form of LOTHAR.
LOTHARmGerman, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Chlodochar meaning "famous army", derived from the elements hlud "famous" and hari "army". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish king, the son of Louis I, who ruled the region called Lorraine. It was also borne by medieval kings of France, Italy and the Holy Roman Empire.
LOUISmFrench, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LOUISAfEnglish, German, Dutch
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of 'Little Women'.
LOUISEfFrench, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LOUIZAfGreek
Greek feminine form of LOUIS.
LOUPmFrench
French form of the Late Latin name Lupus which meant "wolf". Lupus was the name of several early saints, including a 5th-century bishop of Troyes who apparently convinced Attila to spare the city.
LOURENÇOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOURENSmFrisian, Dutch
Frisian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOVE (1)mSwedish
Swedish form of LOUIS.
LOVIISAfFinnish
Finnish feminine form of LOUIS.
LOVIISEfEstonian
Estonian feminine form of LOUIS.
LOVISAfSwedish
Swedish feminine form of LOUIS.
LOVISEfDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian feminine form of LOUIS.
LOVRENCmSlovene
Slovene form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOVRENCOmCroatian (Rare)
Croatian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOWRIfWelsh
Welsh form of LAURA.
LUANAfEnglish, Italian, Portuguese
From the movie 'Bird of Paradise' (1932), in which it was borne by the main character, a Polynesian girl. The movie was based on a 1912 play of the same name set in Hawaii.
ĽUBAfSlovak
Slovak form of LJUBA.
LUBBERTmFrisian
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and beraht "bright".
ĽUBOMÍRmSlovak
Slovak form of LUBOMÍR.
LUBOMÍRmCzech
Derived from the Slavic elements lyuby "love" and miru "peace, world".
LUCmFrench
French form of LUKE.
LUCA (1)mItalian, Romanian, German
Italian and Romanian form of LUKE. This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
LUCA (2)fHungarian, Croatian
Hungarian and Croatian form of LUCIA.
LÚCÁSmIrish
Irish form of LUCAS.
LUCASmEnglish, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).
LÚCIAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of LUCIA.
LUCÍAfSpanish
Spanish form of LUCIA.
LUCIAfItalian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCIANmRomanian, English
Romanian and English form of LUCIANUS. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.
LUCIANOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LUCIANUS.
LUCIEfFrench, Czech
French and Czech form of LUCIA.
LUCIENmFrench
French form of LUCIANUS.
LUCIENNEfFrench
Feminine form of LUCIEN.
LŪCIJAfLatvian
Latvian form of LUCIA.
LUCIJAfSlovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian form of LUCIA.
LUCIJANmCroatian
Croatian form of LUCIAN.
LUCILAfSpanish
Spanish form of LUCILLA.
LUCÍLIAfPortuguese
Portuguese feminine form of LUCILIUS.
LUCILIOmItalian
Italian form of LUCILIUS.
LUCILLAfItalian, Ancient Roman
Latin diminutive of LUCIA. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred in Rome.
LUCILLEfFrench, English
French form of LUCILLA. A famous bearer was American comedienne Lucille Ball (1911-1989).
LUCINDAfEnglish, Portuguese, Literature
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play 'The Doctor in Spite of Himself' (1666).
LÚCIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of LUCIUS.
LUCIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of LUCIUS.
LUCIUSmAncient Roman, Biblical, English
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was derived from Latin lux "light". This was the most popular of the praenomina. Two Etruscan kings of early Rome had this name as well as several prominent later Romans, including Lucius Annaeus Seneca (known simply as Seneca), a statesman, philosopher, orator and tragedian. The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament belonging to a Christian in Antioch. It was also borne by three popes, including the 3rd-century Saint Lucius. Despite this, the name was not regularly used in the Christian world until after the Renaissance.
ŁUCJAfPolish
Polish feminine form of LUCIUS.
ŁUCJANmPolish
Polish form of LUCIANUS.
LUCRÈCEf & mFrench
French form of both LUCRETIA and its masculine form Lucretius.
LUCRETIAfAncient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
LUCREZIAfItalian
Italian form of LUCRETIA.
LUCYfEnglish
English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.
LUCYNAfPolish
Polish form of LUCINA.
LUDGERmGerman, Dutch
From the Germanic name Leudagar which was derived from the elements leud "people" and ger "spear". Saint Ludger was an 8th-century Frisian Benedictine bishop who founded a monastery at Munster.
LUDISmLatvian
Latvian form of LUDWIG.
LUDIVINEfFrench
Possibly from a feminine form of LEUTWIN. It was popularized in the 1970s by a character from the television miniseries 'Les Gens de Mogador'.
LUDMIŁAfPolish
Polish form of LUDMILA.
LUDMILAfCzech, Russian
Means "favour of the people" from the Slavic elements lyudu "people" and milu "gracious, dear". Saint Ludmila was a 10th-century duchess of Bohemia, the grandmother of Saint Václav. She was murdered on the orders of her daughter-in-law Drahomíra.... [more]
LUDOmDutch
Short form of LUDOVICUS or LUDOLF.
LUDOLFmGerman, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hludwolf which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wolf "wolf".
LUDOVICmFrench
Medieval Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of an 1833 opera by the French composer Fromental Halévy.
LUDOVICOmItalian
Latinate form of LUDWIG.
LUDOVIKOmEsperanto
Esperanto form of LUDWIG. This is the Esperanto name of the philologist Ludwig Zamenhof (1859-1917), the creator of the Esperanto language.
LUDVIGmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of LUDWIG.
LUDVIGSmLatvian
Latvian form of LUDWIG.
LUDVÍKmCzech
Czech form of LUDWIG.
LUDVIKmSlovene
Slovene form of LUDWIG.
LUDWIGmGerman
From the Germanic name Chlodovech, which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman Emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
LUDWIKmPolish
Polish form of LUDWIG.
LUGmIrish Mythology
Old Irish form of LUGH.
LUIGImItalian
Italian form of LOUIS.
LUÍSmPortuguese
Portuguese form of LOUIS.
LUISmSpanish
Spanish form of LOUIS.
LUÍSAfPortuguese
Feminine form of LUÍS.
LUISAfSpanish, Italian
Feminine form of LUIS.
LUISEfGerman
German form of LOUISE.
LUITGARDfGerman, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Leutgard which was derived from the elements leud "people" and gard "enclosure". This was the name of a 13th-century Flemish nun, the patron saint of easy deliveries.
LUITPOLDmGerman (Rare)
German variant of LEOPOLD.
LUIZmPortuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of LOUIS.
LUIZAfPolish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Romanian
Polish, Portuguese and Romanian feminine form of LOUIS.
LUJZAfHungarian, Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak feminine form of LOUIS.
LUKÁCSmHungarian
Hungarian form of LUKE.
LUKÁŠmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of LUKE.
LUKASmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian
German, Scandinavian and Lithuanian form of LUKE.
ŁUKASZmPolish
Polish form of LUKE.
LUKEmEnglish, Biblical
English form of the Greek name Λουκας (Loukas) which meant "from Lucania", Lucania being a region in southern Italy (of uncertain meaning). Luke was a doctor who travelled in the company of the apostle Paul. According to tradition, he was the author of the third gospel and Acts in the New Testament. He was probably of Greek ethnicity. He is considered a saint by many Christian denominations.... [more]
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