Names with Relationship "from different language"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from different language.
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SENDER   m   Yiddish
Yiddish form of ALEXANDER.
SENJA   f   Finnish
Finnish form of XENIA.
SEOC   m   Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of JACK.
SEOIRSE   m   Irish
Irish form of GEORGE.
SEONAG   f   Scottish
Scottish form of JOAN (1).
SEÒRAS   m   Scottish
Scottish form of GEORGE.
SEÒSAIDH   m   Scottish
Scottish form of JOSEPH.
SEOSAMH   m   Irish
Irish form of JOSEPH.
SÉPHORA   f   French
French form of ZIPPORAH.
SEPPHORA   f   Biblical Greek
Greek form of ZIPPORAH.
SEPTIMA   f   Ancient Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of SEPTIMUS.
SERAFIM   m   Greek, Russian, Romanian, Macedonian
Greek, Russian, Romanian and Macedonian form of Seraphinus (see SERAPHINA).
SERAFIMA   f   Russian, Macedonian
Russian and Macedonian form of SERAPHINA.
SERAFIN   m   Polish (Rare)
Polish form of Seraphinus (see SERAPHINA).
SERAFINA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Polish (Rare)
Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Polish form of SERAPHINA.
SERAFINO   m   Italian
Italian form of Seraphinus (see SERAPHINA).
SERAIAH   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "YAHWEH is ruler" in Hebrew. This is the name of several minor characters in the Old Testament, including the father of Ezra.
SÉRAPHIN   m   French
French form of Seraphinus (see SERAPHINA).
SERAPHINA   f   English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.
SÉRAPHINE   f   French
French form of SERAPHINA.
SERDAR   m   Turkish
Turkish form of SARDAR.
SERENA   f   English, Italian, Late Roman
From a Late Latin name which was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
SERGE   m   French
French form of SERGIUS.
SERGEY   m   Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of SERGIUS.
SERGHEI   m   Romanian
Romanian (Moldovan) form of SERGEY.
SERGI   m   Catalan
Catalan form of SERGIUS.
SÉRGIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of SERGIUS.
SERGIO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of SERGIUS.
SERGIU   m   Romanian
Romanian form of SERGIUS.
SERGIUSZ   m   Polish
Polish form of SERGIUS.
SERHIY   m   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of SERGIUS.
ŞERİF   m   Turkish
Turkish form of SHARIF.
ŞERİFE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of SHARIF.
SERVAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of the Late Latin name Servatius, derived from servatus "saved, redeemed". This was the name of a 4th-century saint who helped spread Christianity to the Low Countries.
SERVAOS   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of SERVAAS.
SESTO   m   Italian
Italian form of SEXTUS.
SETH (1)   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
SETTIMIO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Septimius, which was derived from SEPTIMUS. Septimius Severus was an early 3rd-century Roman emperor. This was also the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr.
SEUMAS   m   Scottish
Scottish form of JAMES.
SEVASTYAN   m   Russian (Rare)
Russian form of SEBASTIAN.
SEVDA   f   Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "love" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.
SÉVÈRE   m   French (Rare)
French form of SEVERUS.
SEVERI   m   Finnish
Finnish form of SEVERUS.
SEVERIANO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of the Roman cognomen Severianus, which was derived from SEVERUS.
SÉVERIN   m   French
French form of SEVERINUS.
SEVERIN   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian form of SEVERINUS.
SÉVERINE   f   French
French feminine form of SEVERINUS.
SEVERINO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of SEVERINUS.
SEVERO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form SEVERUS.
SEVİNC   f   Azerbaijani
Means "joy" in Azerbaijani.
SEVİNJ   f   Azerbaijani
Variant of SEVİNC.
SEWERYN   m   Polish
Polish form of SEVERINUS.
SEWERYNA   f   Polish (Rare)
Polish form of SEVERINA.
SEYED   m   Persian
Persian form of SAYYID.
SEYFETTİN   m   Turkish
Turkish form of SAIF AL-DIN.
SEYFULLAH   m   Turkish
Turkish form of SAIFULLAH.
SEYYED   m   Persian
Persian form of SAYYID.
SEYYİD   m   Turkish
Turkish form of SAYYID.
SEYYİT   m   Turkish
Turkish form of SAYYID.
SHABNAM   f   Persian, Urdu
Means "dew" in Persian and Urdu.
SHAE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of SHEA.
SHAHID   m   Arabic, Urdu
Means "witness" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الشاهد (al-Shahid) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
SHAHNAZ   f & m   Persian, Arabic, Urdu
Means "pride of the king" from the Persian elements شاه (shah) "king" and ناز (naz) "pride".
SHAHNOZA   f   Uzbek
Uzbek form of SHAHNAZ.
SHAHRAZAD   f   Persian (Rare), Arabic
Means "free city" from the Persian elements شهر (shahr) "city" and آزاد (azad) "free". This is the name of the fictional storyteller in 'The 1001 Nights'. She tells a story to her husband the king every night for 1001 nights in order to delay her execution.
SHAHRUKH   m   Urdu, Indian, Hindi
Urdu and Hindi form of SHAHROKH. A notable bearer is Indian actor Shahrukh Khan (1965-).
SHAHZAD   m   Persian, Arabic, Urdu
Means "prince, son of the king" in Persian.
SHAILAJA   f   Hinduism, Indian, Telugu
Means "daughter of the mountain" in Sanskrit, from शैल (shaila) meaning "mountain" and (ja) meaning "born". This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
SHAKTI   f & m   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "power" in Sanskrit. In Hinduism a shakti is the female counterpart of a god. The name Shakti is used in particular to refer to the female counterpart of Shiva, also known as Parvati among many other names.
SHAKUNTALA   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit शकुन्त (shakunta) meaning "bird". This is the name of a character in Hindu legend, her story adapted by Kalidasa for the 5th-century play 'Abhijnanashakuntalam'. It tells how Shakuntala, who was raised in the forest by birds, meets and marries the king Dushyanta. After a curse is laid upon them Dushyanta loses his memory and they are separated, but eventually the curse is broken after the king sees the signet ring he gave her.
SHANE   m   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SEÁN. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie 'Shane' (1953).
SHANKAR   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, Telugu, Tamil, Bengali, Nepali
Modern transcription of SHANKARA.
SHANTA   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Means "pacified, calm" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the 'Ramayana' this is the name of a daughter of King Dasharatha.
SHANTANU   m   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Means "wholesome" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' this is the name of a king of Hastinapura.
SHAQUILA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SHAKILA.
SHAQUILLE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of SHAKIL. This name is borne by basketball player Shaquille O'Neal (1972-).
SHARIF   m   Arabic, Urdu, Pashto, Persian, Malay
Means "eminent, virtuous" in Arabic. This was a title used by the descendants of Muhammad.
SHARIFAH   f   Arabic, Malay
Feminine form of SHARIF.
SHAUN   m   English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAVONNE   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHAWN   m   English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAYE   f   English (Rare)
Feminine variant of SHEA.
SHEALTIEL   m   Biblical
Means "I have asked of God" in Hebrew. This was the name of the father of Zerubbabel in the Old Testament.
SHEENA   f   Scottish, English
Anglicized form of SÌNE. This name was popularized outside of Scotland in the 1980s by the singer Sheena Easton (1959-).
SHEILA   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SÍLE.
SHEM   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "name" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Shem is one of Noah's three sons (along with Japheth and Ham) and the ancestor of the Semitic peoples.
SHEMAIAH   m   Biblical
Means "heard by YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This name is borne by many characters in the Old Testament including a prophet in the reign of Rehoboam.
SHEVAUN   f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHEVON   f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHIB   m   Bengali
Bengali form of SHIVA (1).
SHIMMEL   m   Yiddish
Yiddish diminutive of SHIMON.
SHINTA   f   Indonesian, Javanese
Javanese form of SITA.
SHIPHRAH   f   Biblical
Means "beautiful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the midwives who disobeys the Pharaoh's order to kill any Hebrew boys they deliver.
SHIV   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi
Northern Indian form of SHIVA (1).
SHIVA (1)   m   Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit शिव (shiva) meaning "benign, kind, auspicious". Shiva is the Hindu god of destruction and restoration, the husband of the mother goddess Parvati. His aspect is usually terrifying, but it can also be gentle.
SHIVALI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "beloved of SHIVA (1)" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
SHPRINTZA   f   Yiddish
Possibly a Yiddish form of ESPERANZA.
SHPRINTZE   f   Yiddish
Possibly a Yiddish form of ESPERANZA.
SHUG   m   Scottish
Scottish diminutive of HUGH.
SHULAMITE   f   Biblical
Variant of SHULAMMITE used in some versions of the Bible.
SHULAMMITE   f   Hebrew, Biblical
Derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) "peace". This name occurs in the Song of Songs in the Old Testament.
SHYAM   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada, Bengali, Nepali
Modern masculine form of SHYAMA.
SIÂN   f   Welsh
Welsh form of JEANNE.
SIARHEI   m   Belarusian
Belarusian form of SERGIUS.
SIARL   m   Welsh
Welsh form of CHARLES.
SIBILLA   f   Italian
Italian form of SIBYLLA.
SIBYL   f   English
From Greek Σιβυλλα (Sibylla), meaning "prophetess, sibyl". In Greek and Roman legend the sibyls were ten female prophets who practiced at different holy sites in the ancient world. In later Christian theology, the sibyls were thought to have divine knowledge and were revered in much the same way as the Old Testament prophets. Because of this, the name came into general use in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was spelled both Sibyl and Sybil. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps helped by Benjamin Disraeli's novel 'Sybil' (1845).
SIBYLLA   f   Greek, German, Swedish, Late Roman, Late Greek
Greek and Latinate form of SIBYL.
SIBYLLE   f   German, French
German and French form of SIBYL.
SIDDHARTH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Modern form of SIDDHARTHA.
SIDDHARTHA   m   Sanskrit, Bengali
Means "one who has accomplished a goal", derived from Sanskrit सिद्ध (siddha) meaning "accomplished" and अर्थ (artha) meaning "goal". Siddhartha Gautama was the real name of Buddha.
SIDONIE   f   French
French feminine form of SIDONIUS.
SIDONY   f   English (Archaic)
Feminine form of SIDONIUS. This name was in use in the Middle Ages, when it became associated with the word sindon (of Greek origin) meaning "linen", a reference to the Shroud of Turin.
SIEFFRE   m   Welsh
Welsh form of GEOFFREY.
SIEGBERT   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and beraht "bright". This was the name of several Frankish kings, including the 7th-century Sigebert III of Austrasia who is regarded as a saint.
SIEGER   m   Dutch, German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hari "army".
SIEGFRIED   m   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the 'Nibelungenlied'. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. His adventures were largely based on those of the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera 'The Ring of the Nibelung' (1876).
SIEGHARD   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hard "brave, hardy".
SIEGHILD   f   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hild "battle".
SIEGLINDE   f   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and linde "gentle, soft". Sieglinde was the mother of Siegfried in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied'.
SIEGMUND   m   German
German variant of SIGMUND.
SIEGWARD   m   German (Rare)
German form of SIGURD.
SIEMEN   m   Dutch, Frisian
Dutch and Frisian form of SIMON (1).
SIET   m   Frisian
Frisian short form of names beginning with the Germanic element sigu meaning "victory".
SIEUWERD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of SIGURD.
SIF   f   Norse Mythology, Danish, Icelandic
Variant of SIV.
SIGFRID (1)   m   Swedish
Swedish form of SIEGFRIED.
SIGFRID (2)   f   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of SIGRID.
SIGFRIDO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of SIEGFRIED.
SIGISMUND   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Form of SIGMUND in which the first element is sigis, an older form of sigu. Saint Sigismund was a 6th-century king of the Burgundians. This was also the name of kings of Poland and a ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.
SIGMUND   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SIGNE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of SIGNY.
SIGNY   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of SIGNÝ.
SIGNÝ   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse name which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and "new". In Norse legend she was the twin sister of Sigmund and the wife of Siggeir.
SIGRID   f   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SIGRÚN   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and rún "secret". This was the name of a Valkyrie in Norse legend.
SIGRUN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of SIGRÚN.
SIGURD   m   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and varðr "guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga', which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
SIGURÐUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of SIGURD.
SIGVARD   m   Swedish
Swedish form of SIGURD.
SIKANDAR   m   Urdu, Pashto
Urdu and Pashto form of ALEXANDER.
SIKKE   m   Frisian
Frisian diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element sigu which means "victory".
SILAS   m   English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).... [more]
SÍLE   f   Irish
Irish form of CECILIA.
SÌLEAS   f   Scottish
Scottish form of CECILIA.
SILKE   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch diminutive of CELIA or CECILIA.
SILOUANOS   m   Biblical Greek
Form of SILVANUS used in the Greek New Testament.
SILVANO   m   Italian
Italian form of SILVANUS.
SILVANUS   m   Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman name derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.
SILVESTER   m   Dutch, English, Slovene, Slovak, German, Late Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
SILVESTR   m   Czech
Czech form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTRE   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTRO   m   Italian
Italian form of SILVESTER.
SÍLVIA   f   Portuguese, Catalan
Portuguese and Catalan form of SILVIA.
SILVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SILVIE   f   Czech
Czech form of SILVIA.
SILVIJO   m   Croatian
Croatian form of SILVIUS.
SILVIO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of SILVIUS.
SILVIU   m   Romanian
Romanian form of SILVIUS.
SILVIYA   f   Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of SILVIA.
SIMÃO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of SIMON (1).
SIMEON   m   Biblical, Bulgarian, Serbian
From Συμεων (Symeon), the Old Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Shim'on (see SIMON (1)). In the Old Testament this is the name of the second son of Jacob and Leah and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. In the New Testament the Greek rendering Σιμων (Simon) is more common, though Συμεων occurs belonging to a man who blessed the newborn Jesus. He is recognized as a saint in most Christian traditions.... [more]
SIMION   m   Romanian
Romanian form of SIMEON.
SIMO   m   Finnish, Serbian
Finnish and Serbian form of SIMON (1).
ŠIMON   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of SIMON (1).
SIMÓN   m   Spanish
Spanish form of SIMON (1). This name was borne by the South American revolutionary Simón Bolívar (1783-1830).
SIMON (1)   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).... [more]
SIMON (2)   m   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek σιμος (simos) meaning "flat-nosed". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the Telchines, demigods who were the original inhabitants of Rhodes.
SIMONAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of SIMON (1).
SIMONE (1)   f   French, English
French feminine form of SIMON (1). A famous bearer was Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
SIMONE (2)   m   Italian
Italian form of SIMON (1).
SIMONI   m   Georgian
Georgian variant of SIMON (1).
SIMONU   m   Old Church Slavic
Old Slavic form of SIMON (1).
ŠIMUN   m   Croatian
Croatian form of SIMON (1).
SINDRE   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of SINDRI.
SINDRI   m   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Possibly means either "small, trivial" or else "sparkling" in Old Norse. In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf who, with his brother Brokk, made many magical items for the gods.
SÍNE   f   Irish
Irish form of JEANNE.
SÌNE   f   Scottish
Scottish form of JEANNE.
SINÉAD   f   Irish
Irish form of JEANNETTE.
SÌNEAG   f   Scottish
Scottish form of JEANNETTE.
SINTA   f   Indonesian, Javanese
Javanese form of SITA.
SIOBHÁN   f   Irish
Irish form of Jehanne, a Norman French variant of JEANNE.
SIÔN   m   Welsh
Welsh form of JOHN, via Old French Jehan.
SIONED   f   Welsh
Welsh form of JANET.
SIÔR   m   Welsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIORS   m   Welsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIORUS   m   Welsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIOTHRÚN   m   Irish
Irish form of GEOFFREY.
ŞİRİN   f   Turkish
Turkish form of SHIRIN.
ŞIRIN   f   Kurdish
Kurdish form of SHIRIN.
SISTO   m   Italian
Italian form of SIXTUS.
SITA   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Nepali
Means "furrow" in Sanskrit. Sita is the name of the Hindu goddess of the harvest in the 'Rigveda'. This is also the name of the wife of Rama (and an avatar of Lakshmi) in the Hindu epic the 'Ramayana'. In this story Sita is rescued by her husband from the demon king Ravana.
SITI   f   Malay, Indonesian
Malay form of SITA.
SIV   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Means "bride" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology Siv was the wife of Thor.
SIWAN   f   Welsh
Welsh form of JOAN (1).
SIXTE   m   French (Rare)
French form of SIXTUS.
SIXTEN   m   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Sigsteinn, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and steinn "stone".
SIXTUS   m   Late Roman
Latin form of the Greek name Ξυστος (Xystos) meaning "scraped, polished". This name was borne by five popes. The first pope by this name was the sixth to serve after Saint Peter, so there is a possibility that this name is in fact derived from Latin sextus "sixth".
SJAAK   m   Dutch
Dutch form of JACQUES or ISAAC.
SJANG   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of Iohannes, via the French form JEAN (1).
SJAREL   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of CHARLES.
SJENG   m   Limburgish
Variant of SJANG.
SJOERD   m   Frisian, Dutch
Frisian form of SIGURD.
SJORS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GEORGE.
SJRA   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of GERARD. Its spelling has been influenced by the French pronunciation of Gérard.
SJURD   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of SIGURD.
SLÀINE   f   Scottish
Scottish form of SLÁINE.
SLAVA   m & f   Russian, Slovene, Croatian
Short form of Slavic names containing the element slava "glory".
SLAVEN   m   Croatian, Serbian
Derived from Slavic slava meaning "glory".
SLAVĚNA   f   Czech
Derived from Slavic slava meaning "glory".
SLAVICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from Slavic slava meaning "glory".
SLAVKO   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Derived from Slavic slava meaning "glory".
SLAVOMÍR   m   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of SŁAWOMIR.
SLAVOMIR   m   Croatian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Croatian and Serbian form of SŁAWOMIR.
SŁAWOMIR   m   Polish
Derived from the Slavic element slava meaning "glory" combined with meru meaning "great, famous" or miru meaning "peace, world".
SNORRE   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of SNORRI.
SNORRI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse snerra "attack, onslaught". This name was borne by Snorri Sturluson, a 13th-century Icelandic historian and poet, the author of the Prose Edda.
SOBIESŁAW   m   Polish (Rare)
Derived from Slavic elements, possibly sebe meaning "for oneself", combined with slava "glory". This name (in the Czech form Soběslav) was borne by two 12th-century dukes of Bohemia.
SOFFÍA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of SOPHIA.
SOFÍA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of SOPHIA.
SOFIE   f   German, Danish, Dutch, Czech
Form of SOPHIE.
SOFIYA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of SOPHIA.
SOFRONIO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of SOPHRONIUS.
SOFYA   f   Russian
Russian form of SOPHIA.
SOHEIL   m   Persian
Persian form of SUHAIL.
SOHEILA   f   Persian
Persian feminine form of SUHAIL.
SOHVI   f   Finnish
Finnish form of SOPHIA.
SOINI   m   Finnish
Finnish form of SVEN.
SOLANGE   f   French
French form of the Late Latin name Sollemnia, which was derived from Latin sollemnis "religious". This was the name of a French shepherdess who became a saint after she was killed by her master.
SOLOMON   m   Biblical, English, Jewish
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh) which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) "peace". As told in the Old Testament, Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David and Bathsheba. He was renowned for his wisdom and wealth. Towards the end of his reign he angered God by turning to idolatry. Supposedly, he was the author of the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon.... [more]
SÓLVEIG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of SOLVEIG.
SOLVEIG   f   Norwegian, Swedish
From an Old Norse name which was derived from the elements sól "sun" and veig "strength". This is the name of the heroine in Henrik Ibsen's play 'Peer Gynt' (1876).
SOLVEIGA   f   Latvian, Lithuanian
Latvian and Lithuanian form of SOLVEIG.
SOLVEJ   f   Danish
Danish form of SOLVEIG.
SOLVIG   f   Swedish
Swedish variant form of SOLVEIG.
SOMAYEH   f   Persian
Persian form of SUMAYYA.
SOMHAIRLE   m   Scottish, Irish
Gaelic form of Somarliðr (see SOMERLED).
SOŇA   f   Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of SONYA.
SONAM   f & m   Tibetan, Bhutanese, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "virtuous, good karma, fortunate" in Tibetan.
SONDRA   f   English
Variant of SAUNDRA. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character in Theodore Dreiser's novel 'An American Tragedy' (1925) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1931).
SONYA   f   Russian, English
Russian diminutive of SOPHIA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1869, English translation 1886).
SOPHIA   f   English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
SOPHIE   f   French, English, German, Dutch
French form of SOPHIA.
SOPIO   f   Georgian
Georgian form of SOPHIA.
SORAYA   f   Persian, Spanish, French
Persian form of THURAYYA. It became popular in some parts of Europe because of the fame of Princess Soraya, wife of the last Shah of Iran, who became a European socialite.
SORCHA   f   Irish, Scottish
Means "radiant" in Gaelic. It is sometimes used as an Irish form of Sarah.
SÖREN   m   Swedish, German
Swedish and German form of SØREN.
SØREN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of SEVERINUS. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher who is regarded as a precursor of existentialism.
SOSIMO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of ZOSIMUS.
SOSLAN   m   Ossetian
Ossetian form of SOSRUKO.
SOUSANNA   f   Biblical Greek
Greek form of SUSANNA.
SPIRIDON   m   Greek, Serbian, Croatian
Serian and Croatian form of SPYRIDON, as well as a variant transcription of the Greek name.
SRI   m & f   Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Indonesian
Indonesian and southern Indian form of SHRI.
SRIDEVI   f   Indian, Telugu, Tamil
Variant of SHRIDEVI.
SROEL   m   Yiddish
Yiddish form of ISRAEL.
STAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of ANASTASIUS or EUSTACHIUS.
STAFFAN   m   Swedish
Swedish form of STEPHEN.
STAN (2)   m   Romanian
Probably a short form of STANISLAV.
STANIMIR   m   Bulgarian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements stani "stand, become" and miru "peace, world".
STANISLAV   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements stani meaning "stand, become" combined with slava meaning "glory".
STANISŁAW   m   Polish
Polish form of STANISLAV. Two kings of Poland have borne this name.
STANISLOVAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of STANISLAV.
STEAFAN   m   Scottish
Scottish form of STEPHEN.
STEAPHAN   m   Scottish
Scottish form of STEPHEN.
STEEN   m   Danish
Danish cognate of STEN.
ŠTEFAN   m   Slovene, Slovak, Croatian
Slovene and Slovak form of STEPHEN.
ȘTEFAN   m   Romanian
Romanian form of STEPHEN.
STEFÁN   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of STEPHEN.
STEFÁNIA   f   Hungarian
Hungarian feminine form of STEPHEN.
STEFANIE   f   German, Dutch, Danish
Variant of STEPHANIE.
STEFANO   m   Italian
Italian form of STEPHEN.
STEFANS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of STEPHEN.
STEFANU   m   Old Church Slavic
Old Slavic form of STEPHEN.
STEFANUS   m   Dutch
Official Dutch form of STEPHEN, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.
STEFFAN   m   Welsh
Welsh form of STEPHEN.
STEFFEN   m   Low German, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Low German and Danish form of STEPHEN.
STEIN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian cognate of STEN.
STEINAR   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Steinarr, derived from the elements steinn "stone" and arr "warrior".
STEINN   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of STEN.
STELIAN   m   Romanian
Romanian form of STYLIANOS.
STEN   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Derived from the Old Norse name Steinn meaning "stone".
ŠTĚPÁN   m   Czech
Czech form of STEPHEN.
STEPAN   m   Russian, Armenian
Russian and Armenian form of Stephanos (see STEPHEN).
STEPANE   m   Georgian
Georgian form of Stephanos (see STEPHEN).
STEPHAN   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch form of STEPHEN.
STÉPHANE   m   French
French form of STEPHEN.
STEPHANIE   f   English, German
Feminine form of STEPHEN.
STEPHANUS   m   Biblical Latin
Latin form of STEPHEN.
STEPHEN   m   English, Biblical
From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown", more precisely "that which surrounds". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament. He is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.... [more]
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