Names Categorized "leo tolstoy characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include leo tolstoy characters.
gender
usage
ADAM m English, French, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADOLF m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
AGRAFENA f Russian
Russian form of AGRIPPINA.
ALBERT m English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert meaning "noble and bright", composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALEKSEY m Russian
Russian form of ALEXIS. This was the name of a 17th-century czar of Russia.
ALEXANDER m English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀλέξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALEXANDRE m French, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Form of ALEXANDER in several languages. This name was borne by the 19th-century French author Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), who wrote The Three Musketeers.
ALEXEI m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Алексей (see ALEKSEY).
ALEXEY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Алексей (see ALEKSEY).
ALINE f French, Portuguese (Brazilian), English
Medieval short form of ADELINE. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of EILEEN. This was the name of a popular 1965 song by the French singer Christophe.
ALPHONSE m French
French form of ALFONSO.
ALYOSHA m Russian
Diminutive of ALEKSEY.
AMALIA f Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
ANATOLE m French
French form of ANATOLIUS.
ANDREI m Romanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian, Old Church Slavic
Romanian form of ANDREW, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Андрей or Belarusian Андрэй (see ANDREY).
ANDREW m English, Biblical
English form of the Greek name Ἀνδρέας (Andreas), which was derived from ἀνδρεῖος (andreios) meaning "manly, masculine", a derivative of ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.... [more]
ANDREY m Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Russian, Bulgarian and Belarusian form of ANDREW.
ANNA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
ANNETTE f French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNIE f English, French, Dutch
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
ARMAND m French
French form of HERMAN.
AUGUSTIN m French, Romanian, Czech, German (Rare)
Form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)) in several languages.
BETSY f English
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BORIS m Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
CARL m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of CHARLES. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
CÉLESTIN m French
French form of CAELESTINUS.
CHARLES m English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CYRUS m English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From Κῦρος (Kyros), the Greek form of the Persian name Kūrush, which may mean "far sighted" or "young". The name is sometimes associated with Greek κύριος (kyrios) meaning "lord". It was borne by several kings of Persia, including Cyrus the Great, who conquered Babylon. He is famous in the Old Testament for freeing the captive Jews and allowing them to return to Israel. As an English name, it first came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
DANILO m Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian
Form of DANIEL in various languages.
DARYA (1) f Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian
Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian form of DARIA.
DMITRI m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Дмитрий (see DMITRIY).
DMITRY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Дмитрий (see DMITRIY).
DOLLY f English
Diminutive of DOROTHY. Doll and Dolly were used from the 16th century, and the common English word doll (for the plaything) is derived from them. In modern times this name is also sometimes used as a diminutive of DOLORES.
DOMINIQUE f & m French
French feminine and masculine form of DOMINIC.
DUNYASHA f Russian
Diminutive of AVDOTYA.
EKATERINA f Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of KATHERINE, and an alternate transcription of Russian Екатерина (see YEKATERINA).
ELENA f Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Estonian, Russian, Greek, German, English, Medieval Slavic
Form of HELEN used in various languages, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Елена (see YELENA).
ELISABETA f Romanian
Romanian form of ELIZABETH.
ELIZABETH f English, Biblical
From Ἐλισάβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.... [more]
ELIZAVETA f Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Елизавета (see YELIZAVETA).
EUGENE m English
English form of Eugenius, the Latin form of the Greek name Εὐγένιος (Eugenios), which was derived from the Greek word εὐγενής (eugenes) meaning "well born". It is composed of the elements εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and γενής (genes) meaning "born". This was the name of several saints and four popes.... [more]
FEDOR m Russian
Variant of FYODOR.
FEDYA m Russian
Diminutive of FYODOR.
FERDINAND m German, French, Dutch, English, Slovak, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FILIPP m Russian
Russian form of PHILIP.
FRANCIS m & f English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus meaning "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.... [more]
FRANÇOISE f French
Feminine form of FRANÇOIS.
FRANZ m German
German form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). This name was borne by the influential writer Franz Kafka (1883-1924), author of The Trial and The Castle among other works. It was also the name of rulers of Austria and the Holy Roman Empire.
FYODOR m Russian
Russian form of THEODORE. It was borne by three tsars of Russia. Another notable bearer was Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), the Russian author of such works as Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov.
GAVRILO m Serbian
Serbian form of GABRIEL.
GEORGES m French
French form of GEORGE. This name was borne by the French artists Georges Seurat (1859-1891) and Georges Braque (1882-1963).
GERASIM m Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Russian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of GERASIMOS.
GERVAIS m French
French form of GERVASIUS.
HÉLÈNE f French
French form of HELEN.
ILYA m Russian, Belarusian
Russian and Belarusian form of ELIJAH.
IVAN m Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Romanian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote Fathers and Sons, and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
JACQUES m French
French form of Iacobus, the New Testament Latin form of JAMES.
JEAN (1) m French
Modern French form of Jehan, the Old French form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Since the 12th century it has consistently been the most common male name in France. It finally dropped from the top rank in 1958, unseated by Philippe.... [more]
JEAN-BAPTISTE m French
Combination of JEAN (1) and BAPTISTE, referring to Saint John the Baptist.
JOACHIM m German, French, Polish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Contracted form of JEHOIACHIN or JEHOIAKIM. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
JOHANN m German
German form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Famous bearers include German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), German novelist and poet Johann Goethe (1749-1832), and Austrian composers Johann Strauss the Elder (1804-1849) and his son Johann Strauss the Younger (1825-1899).
JOSEPH m English, French, German, Biblical
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ἰωσήφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add", from the root יָסַף (yasaf). In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.... [more]
JULIE f French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JUSTUS m German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Latin name meaning "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
KARL m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Estonian, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KATERINA f Macedonian, Russian, Bulgarian, Greek, Late Roman
Macedonian form of KATHERINE, a Russian short form of YEKATERINA, a Bulgarian short form of EKATERINA, and a Greek variant of AIKATERINE.
KIRILL m Russian
Russian form of CYRIL.
KITTY f English
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KOSTYA m Russian
Russian diminutive of KONSTANTIN.
LEVIN m German (Rare)
German form of LEOBWIN.
LIDIA f Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian
Polish, Italian, Spanish and Romanian form of LYDIA.
LISA f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of ELIZABETH and its cognates in other languages. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the Mona Lisa, the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.... [more]
LIZA f English, Russian, Georgian
Short form of ELIZABETH (English), YELIZAVETA (Russian) or ELISABED (Georgian).
LOUIS m French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LOUISE f French, English, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch, German
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LUKA m Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic
Form of Lucas (see LUKE) in several languages.
LYDIA f English, German, Dutch, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
MAKAR m Russian
Russian form of Makarios (see MACARIO).
MARIA f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARY f English, Biblical
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριάμ (Mariam) and Μαρία (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".... [more]
MARYA f Russian
Russian variant form of MARIA.
MASHA f Russian
Russian diminutive of MARIYA.
MATVEI m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Матвей (see MATVEY).
MICHAEL m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHEL m French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MIKHAIL m Russian, Belarusian, Bulgarian
Russian and Belarusian form of MICHAEL, and an alternate transcription of Bulgarian Михаил (see MIHAIL). This was the name of two Russian tsars. Other notable bearers include the poet Mikhail Lermontov (1814-1841) and the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev (1931-).
MITYA m Russian
Diminutive of DMITRIY or MITROFAN.
NAPOLEON m History, English
From the old Italian name Napoleone, used most notably by the French emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was born on Corsica. The etymology is uncertain, but it is possibly derived from the Germanic Nibelungen meaning "sons of mist", a name used in Germanic mythology to refer to the keepers of a hoard of treasure (often identified with the Burgundians). Alternatively, it could be connected to the name of the Italian city of Napoli (Naples).
NASTASYA f Russian
Short form of ANASTASIYA.
NATALYA f Russian
Russian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATASHA f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
NICHOLAS m English
From the Greek name Νικόλαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and λαός (laos) meaning "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.... [more]
NICOLAS m French
French form of NICHOLAS.
NIKITA (1) m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Russian form of NIKETAS. This form is also used in Ukrainian and Belarusian alongside the more traditional forms Mykyta and Mikita.
NIKOLAI m Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see NIKOLAY).
NIKOLAY m Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of NICHOLAS. A notable bearer was the Russian novelist Nikolay Gogol (1809-1852).
OSIP m Russian
Russian form of JOSEPH.
PAVEL m Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian, Belarusian
Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian and Belarusian form of PAUL.
PELAGEYA f Russian
Russian form of PELAGIA.
PETER m English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Derived from Greek Πέτρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.... [more]
PETYA m & f Russian, Bulgarian
Russian masculine diminutive of PYOTR or Bulgarian feminine diminutive of PETAR.
PIERRE m French, Swedish
French form of PETER. This name has been consistently popular in France since the 13th century, but fell out of the top 100 names in 2017. It was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
PIOTR m Polish, Belarusian
Polish and Belarusian form of PETER.
PRASKOVYA f Russian
Russian form of PARASKEVE.
PYOTR m Russian
Russian form of PETER. A famous bearer was the Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893).
SERGEI m Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Сергей (see SERGEY).
SERGEY m Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of SERGIUS.
SERGIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name, possibly meaning "servant" in Latin but most likely of unknown Etruscan origin. Saint Sergius was a 4th-century Roman officer who was martyred in Syria with his companion Bacchus. They are the patron saints of Christian desert nomads. Another saint by this name (in the Russian form Sergey) was a 14th-century Russian spiritual leader. The name was also borne by four popes.
SHAMIL m Arabic, Kazakh, Avar, Chechen, Tatar, Azerbaijani
From Arabic شاميل (shamil) meaning "comprehensive, universal".
SOFYA f Russian
Russian form of SOPHIA.
SOLON m Ancient Greek
Possibly from Greek σόλος (solos) meaning "lump of iron". This was the name of an Athenian statesman who reformed the laws and government of the city.
SONYA f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of SOPHIA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace (1869, English translation 1886).
SOPHIA f English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
SOPHIE f French, English, German, Dutch
French form of SOPHIA.
STEPAN m Russian, Ukrainian, Armenian
Russian, Ukrainian and Armenian form of Stephanos (see STEPHEN).
TIKHON m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of TYCHON.
USTINYA f Russian (Rare)
Russian variant form of Iustina (see JUSTINA).
VASIA f Greek
Diminutive of VASILIKI.
VASILI m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see VASILIY).
VASILY m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see VASILIY).
VASKA m & f Russian, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Russian diminutive of VASILIY (masculine) or a Macedonian and Bulgarian diminutive of VASILIJA (feminine).
VERA (1) f Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Belarusian, Georgian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VINCENT m English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was derived from Latin vincere meaning "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
YAKOV m Hebrew, Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of JACOB (or JAMES), and an alternate transcription of Hebrew יַעֲקֹב (see YAAKOV).
YELENA f Russian
Russian form of HELEN.
ZAKHAR m Russian
Russian form of ZECHARIAH.