Names Categorized "wii sports opponent miis"

This is a list of names in which the categories include wii sports opponent miis.
gender
usage
ABBY f English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
AI (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
AKIRA m & f Japanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name. A famous bearer was the Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), given name written .
ALEX m & f English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Czech, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ANDY m & f English
Diminutive of ANDREW or sometimes ANDREA (2). American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
ANNA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
ASHLEY f & m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls. It reached its height of popularity in America in 1987, but it did not become the highest ranked name until 1991, being overshadowed by the likewise-popular Jessica until then. In the United Kingdom it is still more common as a masculine name.
CHRIS m & f English, Dutch, German, Danish
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
DAISUKE m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" and (suke) meaning "help". Other kanji combinations are possible.
DAVID m English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
EMILY f English
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.... [more]
EMMA f English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
EVA f Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, Danish, Icelandic, Faroese, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Form of EVE used in various languages. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. The name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.... [more]
HARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HAYLEY f English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous.
HELEN f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek Ἑλένη (Helene), probably from Greek ἑλένη (helene) meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σελήνη (selene) meaning "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HIROSHI m Japanese
From Japanese (hiroshi) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiroshi) meaning "prosperous", or other kanji and kanji combinations that are read the same way.
JACKIE m & f English
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African American to play in Major League Baseball.
JAKE m English
Medieval variant of JACK. It is also sometimes used as a short form of JACOB.
JAMES m English, Biblical
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus, a variant of the Biblical Latin form Iacobus, from the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.... [more]
JESSIE (1) f Scottish, English
Originally a Scottish diminutive of JEAN (2). In modern times it is also used as a diminutive of JESSICA.
JULIE f French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
KATHRIN f German
German short form of KATHARINA.
KEIKO f Japanese
From Japanese (kei) meaning "celebrate", (kei) meaning "respect", (kei) meaning "open, begin" or (kei) meaning "favour, benefit" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
LUCA (1) m Italian, Romanian
Italian and Romanian form of Lucas (see LUKE). This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
LUCÍA f Spanish
Spanish form of LUCIA. This is the most popular name for girls in Spain beginning in 2003.
MARCO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Italian form of Marcus (see MARK). During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
MARIA f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARTIN m English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MATT m English
Short form of MATTHEW.
MICHAEL m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MIKE m English
Short form of MICHAEL.
MISAKI f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (saki) meaning "blossom". This name can be formed from other combinations of kanji as well.
MIYU f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth" combined with (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yu) meaning "tie, bind" or (yu) meaning "evening". Other kanji combinations are possible.
NAOMI (2) f & m Japanese
From Japanese (nao) meaning "straight" and (mi) meaning "beautiful" (usually feminine) or (mi) meaning "self" (usually masculine). Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
NICK m English, Dutch
Short form of NICHOLAS.
OSCAR m English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
PIERRE m French, Swedish
French form of PETER. This name has been consistently popular in France since the 13th century, but fell out of the top 100 names in 2017. It was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
RACHEL f English, Hebrew, French, Dutch, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name רָחֵל (Rachel) meaning "ewe". In the Old Testament this is the name of the favourite wife of Jacob. Jacob was tricked by her father Laban into marrying her older sister Leah first, though in exchange for seven years of work Laban allowed Jacob to marry Rachel too. Initially barren and facing her husband's anger, she offered her handmaid Bilhah to Jacob to bear him children. Eventually she was herself able to conceive, becoming the mother of Joseph and Benjamin.... [more]
REN m & f Japanese
From Japanese (ren) meaning "lotus", (ren) meaning "love", or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
RIN f & m Japanese
From Japanese (rin) meaning "dignified, severe, cold" or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
RYAN m Irish, English
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
SABURO m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 三郎 (see SABURŌ).
SAKURA f Japanese
From Japanese (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom", though it is often written using the hiragana writing system. It can also come from (saku) meaning "blossom" and (ra) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable" as well as other kanji combinations.
SARAH f English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).... [more]
SHOUTA m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 翔太 (see SHŌTA).
SILKE f German, Dutch
German and Dutch diminutive of CELIA or CECILIA.
STEPH f & m English
Short form of STEPHANIE or STEPHEN.
STEVE m English
Short form of STEVEN. A notable bearer was American technology entrepreneur Steve Jobs (1955-2011).
TAKUMI m Japanese
From Japanese (takumi) meaning "artisan" or (takumi) meaning "skillful". It can also come from (taku) meaning "expand, open, support" combined with (mi) meaning "sea, ocean" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth". This name can also be formed of other kanji combinations.
THEO m English, German, Dutch
Short form of THEODORE, THEOBALD, and other names that begin with Theo.
TYRONE m English
From the name of a county in Northern Ireland, which is derived from Irish Gaelic Tir Eoghain meaning "land of EOGHAN". This name was popularized by American actor Tyrone Power (1914-1958), who was named after his great-grandfather, an Irish actor.
VÍCTOR m Spanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan form of VICTOR.
YOKO f Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 陽子 or 洋子 (see YŌKO).
YOSHI m & f Japanese
From Japanese (yoshi) meaning "good luck", (yoshi) meaning "righteous", or (yoshi) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable", as well as other kanji with the same reading.