Sharley's Personal Name List

Zhora
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Жора(Russian)
Diminutive of Yuriy or Georgiy.
Zhenya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Женя(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ZHEH-nyə(Russian)
Rating: 43% based on 10 votes
Russian diminutive of Yevgeniya or Yevgeniy or a Bulgarian diminutive of Evgeniya.
Zephyr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ζέφυρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZEHF-ər(English)
Rating: 54% based on 10 votes
From the Greek Ζέφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.
Zelig
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: זעליג, זעליק(Yiddish) זליג(Hebrew)
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Means "blessed, happy" in Yiddish, a vernacular form of Asher.
Zaxaria
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Захарїа(Church Slavic)
Rating: 29% based on 10 votes
Old Church Slavic form of Zechariah.
Zarah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זֵרַח(Ancient Hebrew)
Form of Zerah used in some translations of the Bible.
Zalán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: ZAW-lan
Possibly from the name of the region of Zala in western Hungary, itself named for the Zala River. This name used by the Hungarian poet Mihály Vörösmarty in his 1823 epic Zalán Futása.
Yuri 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Юрий(Russian) Юрій(Ukrainian) Юрый(Belarusian)
Pronounced: YOO-ryee(Russian)
Rating: 45% based on 12 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Юрий, Ukrainian Юрій or Belarusian Юрый (see Yuriy).
Yoska
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Romani form of Jóska, the Hungarian diminutive of József (Joseph).
Yahya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish, Persian
Other Scripts: يحيى(Arabic) یحیی(Persian)
Pronounced: YAH-ya(Arabic)
Popularity: the United States: #0 (down 56)
Arabic, Turkish and Persian form of Yochanan (see John). This name honours John the Baptist, a prophet in Islam.
Xhelal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
Albanian form of Jalal.
Wynn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: WIN
Rating: 58% based on 12 votes
Variant of Wyn.
Willoughby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIL-ə-bee
Rating: 56% based on 12 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow town" in Old English.
William
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-yəm
Rating: 84% based on 14 votes
Popularity: the United States: #5 (down 1)
From the Germanic name Willahelm meaning "will helmet", composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". An early saint by this name was the 8th-century William of Gellone, a cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. From then until the modern era it has been among the most common of English names (with John, Thomas and Robert).

This name was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia. Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero (called Wilhelm in German, Guillaume in French and Guglielmo in Italian). In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

In the American rankings (since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it one of the most consistently popular names (although it has never reached the top rank). In modern times its short form, Liam, has periodically been more popular than William itself, in the United Kingdom in the 1990s and the United States in the 2010s.

Waldek
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: VAL-dehk
Rating: 34% based on 9 votes
Polish diminutive of Waldemar.
Vyvyan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Cornish
Cornish form of Vivian, as well as an English variant. This was the name of one of Oscar Wilde's sons.
Vladlen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Владлен(Russian)
Pronounced: vlu-DLYEHN
Rating: 24% based on 9 votes
Contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the name of the founder of the former Soviet state (see Vladimir and Lenin).
Vladilen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Владилен(Russian)
Pronounced: vlə-dyi-LYEHN
Rating: 24% based on 9 votes
Contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the name of the founder of the former Soviet state (see Vladimir and Lenin).
Vivian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən(English)
Personal remark: Spell it Vyvyan!
Rating: 51% based on 11 votes
From the Latin name Vivianus, which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of Bébinn or a variant of Vivien 2.
Vitaly
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Виталий(Russian) Віталій(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: vyi-TA-lyee(Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 10 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Виталий or Ukrainian Віталій (see Vitaliy).
Vitalis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 40% based on 11 votes
Latin form of Vitale.
Vitalie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Moldovan, Romanian
Moldovan and Romanian form of Vitalis (see Vitale).
Viriato
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
From the Latin name Viriathus or Viriatus, which was derived from viriae "bracelets" (of Celtic origin). Viriathus was a leader of the Lusitani (a tribe of Portugal) who rebelled against Roman rule in the 2nd century BC.
Viorel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Derived from viorea, the Romanian word for the alpine squill flower (species Scilla bifolia) or the sweet violet flower (species Viola odorata). It is derived from Latin viola "violet".
Ville
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Swedish
Pronounced: VEEL-leh(Finnish)
Rating: 31% based on 9 votes
Finnish and Swedish diminutive of Vilhelm and other names beginning with Vil.
Viggo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: VEE-go(Danish) VIG-go(Swedish)
Rating: 60% based on 10 votes
Short form of names containing the Old Norse element víg "war".
Vespasiano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Italian form of Vespasianus (see Vespasian).
Veselko
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Веселко(Serbian)
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
Derived from South Slavic vesel meaning "cheerful".
Veselin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Веселин(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Rating: 27% based on 10 votes
Derived from South Slavic vesel meaning "cheerful".
Vesa 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: VEH-sah
Rating: 29% based on 9 votes
Means "sprout, young tree" in Finnish.
Vere
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 33% based on 9 votes
From a Norman surname, which was from a French place name, which was itself derived from a Gaulish word meaning "alder".
Veer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Limburgish
Pronounced: VI:R
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Limburgish short form of Vera 1.
Vasily
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Василий(Russian)
Pronounced: vu-SYEE-lyee
Rating: 50% based on 10 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see Vasiliy).
Vanja
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Swedish, Norwegian
Other Scripts: Вања(Serbian)
Rating: 49% based on 10 votes
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene (masculine and feminine) form of Vanya. It is also used in Scandinavia, where it is primarily feminine.
Vali
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian diminutive of Valeriu or Valentin.
Valerius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: wa-LEH-ree-oos(Latin) və-LIR-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 48% based on 10 votes
Roman family name that was derived from Latin valere "to be strong". This was the name of several early saints.
Valerio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: va-LEH-ryo(Italian) ba-LEH-ryo(Spanish)
Rating: 40% based on 10 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Valerius.
Valerian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Georgian, Romanian, History
Other Scripts: Валериан(Russian) ვალერიან(Georgian)
Pronounced: və-LIR-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 62% based on 11 votes
From the Roman cognomen Valerianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name Valerius. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor. Several saints also had this name, including a 2nd-century martyr of Lyons.
Valentinian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
English form of Valentinianus, used to refer to the Roman emperor.
Valens
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 34% based on 11 votes
Roman cognomen (see Valentine 1). This name was borne by a 4th-century Roman emperor.
Uolevi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: OO-leh-vee
Finnish form of Olaf.
Tuvia
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טוביה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: TOOV-JAH
Variant transcription of Tovia.
Trygve
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 42% based on 11 votes
Derived from Old Norse tryggr meaning "trustworthy".
Tristan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: TRIS-tən(English) TREES-TAHN(French)
Rating: 65% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #183 (down 32)
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of Drust. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion that makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
Toussaint
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: TOO-SEHN
Rating: 47% based on 10 votes
Means "all saints" in French. This is the name of a Christian festival celebrated on November 1.
Tory 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: TAWR-ee(English)
Rating: 42% based on 10 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly a diminutive of Salvatore.
Torvald
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Rating: 42% based on 10 votes
From the Old Norse name Þórvaldr, which meant "Thor's ruler" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with valdr "ruler".
Torin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 70% based on 12 votes
Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.
Tiziano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: teet-TSYA-no
Italian form of the Roman cognomen Titianus, which was derived from the Roman praenomen Titus. A famous bearer was the Venetian Renaissance painter Tiziano Vecellio (1488-1576), known in English as Titian.
Tierney
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEER-nee(English)
Rating: 51% based on 11 votes
Anglicized form of Tighearnach. In part, it is from a surname derived from the given name.
Tiernan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 64% based on 11 votes
Anglicized form of Tighearnán.
Tiberiu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian form of Tiberius.
Terentiy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Терентий(Russian)
Pronounced: tyi-RYEHN-tyee
Rating: 32% based on 10 votes
Russian form of Terentius (see Terence).
Teagan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TEE-gən
Rating: 50% based on 10 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of Tadhg.
Tavish
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 43% based on 10 votes
Anglicized form of Thàmhais, vocative case of Tàmhas. Alternatively it could be taken from the Scottish surname MacTavish, Anglicized form of Mac Tàmhais, meaning "son of Thomas".
Tatum
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAY-təm
Rating: 40% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #490 (down 3)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.
Tarquin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: TAHR-kwin(English)
Rating: 54% based on 10 votes
From Tarquinius, a Roman name of unknown meaning, possibly Etruscan in origin. This was the name of two early kings of Rome.
Tarmo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Estonian, Finnish
Pronounced: TAHR-mo(Finnish)
Rating: 27% based on 10 votes
Means "vigour, energy, drive" in Estonian and Finnish.
Tancred
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Norman [1]
Pronounced: TANG-krid(English)
Norman form of a Germanic name meaning "thought and counsel", derived from the elements thank "thought" and rad "counsel". This name was common among the medieval Norman nobility of southern Italy. It was borne by a leader of the First Crusade, described by Torquato Tasso in his epic poem Jerusalem Delivered (1580).
Taavi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Estonian, Finnish
Pronounced: TAH-vee(Finnish)
Estonian and Finnish form of David.
Symphony
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIM-fə-nee
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
Simply from the English word, ultimately deriving from Greek σύμφωνος (symphonos) meaning "concordant in sound".
Sybrand
Gender: Masculine
Usage: West Frisian
Pronounced: SEE-brahnt
Frisian form of Sibrand.
Sverre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 36% based on 9 votes
From the Old Norse name Sverrir meaning "wild, swinging, spinning".
Sutton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 31% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #575 (up 64)
Transferred use of the surname Sutton.
Sulo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SOO-lo
Rating: 24% based on 9 votes
Means "charm, grace" in Finnish.
Sterling
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #400 (up 9)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".
Stellan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.
Spencer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPEHN-sər
Rating: 63% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #316 (up 4)
From a surname that meant "dispenser of provisions", derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry". A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).
Sparrow
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SPAR-o, SPEHR-o
Rating: 54% based on 10 votes
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
Sotiris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Σωτήρης(Greek)
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Variant of Sotirios.
Soslan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ossetian
Other Scripts: Сослан(Ossetian)
Ossetian form of Sosruko.
Sorrel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAWR-əl
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
From the name of the sour tasting plant, which may ultimately derive from Germanic sur "sour".
Sorley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish
Pronounced: SAWR-lee
Rating: 25% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of Somhairle.
Sorian
Usage: Romanian
Solly
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish
Rating: 25% based on 8 votes
Diminutive of Solomon.
Sloan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SLON
Rating: 29% based on 8 votes
Variant of Sloane.
Skylar
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Variant of Skyler.
Siôr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: SHOR
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Welsh form of George.
Silvius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: SIL-vee-əs(English)
Derived from Latin silva meaning "wood, forest". This was the family name of several of the legendary kings of Alba Longa. It was also the name of an early saint martyred in Alexandria.
Silviu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: SEEL-vyoo
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Romanian form of Silvius.
Silvio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: SEEL-vyo(Italian) SEEL-byo(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 8 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Silvius.
Silvian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Romanian, English, German
English, German and Romanian form of Silvianus, also sometimes used in The Netherlands.
Shiloh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHIE-lo(English)
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #617 (up 76)
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after actors Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt gave it to their daughter in 2006.
Shelah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שֵׁלָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 21% based on 8 votes
Means "petition, request" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Judah. English bibles also use this spelling to render the unrelated Hebrew name שֵׁלָח (see Shelach), a grandson of Shem.
Shea
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHAY
Rating: 58% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of Séaghdha, sometimes used as a feminine name.
Shalev
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׁלֵו(Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Means "calm, tranquil" in Hebrew.
Shaelyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SHAY-lin
Personal remark: Prefer spelling Shealyn.
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Combination of Shae and Lynn.
Sevastyan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Севастьян(Russian)
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Russian form of Sebastian.
Seryozha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Серёжа(Russian)
Pronounced: sye-RYO-zhah
Diminutive of Sergey.
Seoirse
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHOR-shə
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
Irish form of George.
Sender
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: סענדער(Yiddish) סנדר(Hebrew)
Rating: 26% based on 8 votes
Yiddish form of Alexander.
Selig
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: סעליג(Yiddish)
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Variant of Zelig.
Selby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-bee
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
Sebestyén
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: SHEH-besh-kyehn
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Hungarian form of Sebastianus (see Sebastian).
Sebastjan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene
Slovene form of Sebastianus (see Sebastian).
Sebastian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian, Czech
Pronounced: zeh-BAS-tyan(German) sə-BAS-chən(English) seh-BAS-dyan(Danish) seh-BAS-tyan(Polish) SEH-bahs-tee-ahn(Finnish) seh-bas-tee-AN(Romanian) SEH-bas-ti-yan(Czech)
Rating: 77% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #19 (down 1)
From the Latin name Sebastianus, which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστός (sebastos) meaning "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

Séarlas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHAHR-las
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Irish form of Charles.
Seanán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
Variant of Senán.
Schuyler
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
From a Dutch surname meaning "scholar". Dutch settlers brought the surname to America, where it was subsequently adopted as a given name in honour of the American general and senator Philip Schuyler (1733-1804) [1].
Savio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: SA-vyo
Means "clever, bright" in Italian.
Saveriu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Corsican
Corsican form of Xavier.
Saverio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Italian form of Xavier.
Satchel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SACH-əl
Rating: 28% based on 8 votes
From a surname derived from Old English sacc meaning "sack, bag", referring to a person who was a bag maker.
Sasha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Other Scripts: Саша(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: SASH-ə(English) SAH-shə(English) SA-SHA(French)
Rating: 66% based on 8 votes
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of Aleksandr or Aleksandra.
Sascha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ZA-sha
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
German form of Sasha.
Sarava
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
From a phrase used by members of the Candomblé religion (an African religion that was taken to Brazil by African slaves), which means "good luck".
Salah 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: صلاح(Arabic)
Pronounced: sa-LAH
Rating: 28% based on 8 votes
Means "righteousness" in Arabic.
Sage
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAYJ
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #442 (up 7)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
Sabriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: SAY-bree-əl
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
There are multiple explanations for the etymology of this name. One is that it is a variant form of Sabrael. An other is that it is derived from Hebrew sabi "stop, rest" combined with el "God", thus meaning "(the) rest of God". Lastly, it could also have been derived from the name of the Sabra plant (a prickly pear) combined with el "God", making the meaning something like "cactus of God". The name of Sabriel was first used by author Garth Nix for the heroine of his fantasy novel 'Sabriel' (1995), and an important protagonist in the sequels 'Lirael' and 'Abhorsen'. It is uncertain where and how Garth Nix decided upon using the name Sabriel.
Sabri
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish
Other Scripts: صبريّ(Arabic)
Pronounced: SAB-ree(Arabic)
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Means "patient" in Arabic.
Sable
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAY-bəl
Rating: 58% based on 8 votes
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.
Ryland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lənd
Popularity: the United States: #518 (up 17)
From an English surname, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.
Rylan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lən
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #327 (down 3)
Possibly a variant of Ryland, though it could also be an invented name inspired by other names like Ryan or Riley.
Ryan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: RIE-ən(English)
Rating: 66% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #57 (down 3)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
Ruslan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Turkmen, Azerbaijani, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar, Circassian, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: Руслан(Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar) Руслъан(Western Circassian, Eastern Circassian)
Pronounced: ruws-LAN(Russian)
Form of Yeruslan used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem Ruslan and Ludmila (1820), which was loosely based on Russian and Tatar folktales of Yeruslan Lazarevich.
Rune
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: ROO-nə(Norwegian) ROO-neh(Danish, Swedish)
Rating: 58% based on 8 votes
Derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore".
Rowley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Variant of Roly.
Rory
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAWR-ee
Rating: 80% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #330 (up 28)
Anglicized form of Ruaidhrí.
Rónán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: RO-nahn
Rating: 73% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #269 (down 1)
Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Riley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Rating: 64% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #258 (up 5)
From a surname that comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of Reilly. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
René
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, German, Spanish, Slovak, Czech
Pronounced: RU-NEH(French) rə-NEH(German) reh-NEH(Spanish) REH-neh(Slovak, Czech)
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #976 (down 39)
French form of Renatus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and rationalist philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650).
Rémy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: REH-MEE
Rating: 59% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #355 (up 62)
French form of the Latin name Remigius, which was derived from Latin remigis "oarsman, rower". Saint Rémy was a 5th-century bishop who converted and baptized Clovis, king of the Franks.
Rain 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RAYN
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.
Prospero
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: PRAW-speh-ro
Rating: 48% based on 9 votes
Italian form of Prosper. This was the name of the shipwrecked magician in The Tempest (1611) by Shakespeare.
Prosper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: PRAWS-PEHR(French) PRAHS-pər(English)
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
From the Latin name Prosperus, which meant "fortunate, successful". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a supporter of Saint Augustine. It has never been common as an English name, though the Puritans used it, partly because it is identical to the English word prosper.
Prasanna
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tamil, Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Odia, Hindi
Other Scripts: பிரசன்னா(Tamil) ಪ್ರಸನ್ನ(Kannada) ప్రసన్న(Telugu) ପ୍ରସନ୍ନ(Odia) प्रसन्न(Hindi)
Means "clear, bright, tranquil" in Sanskrit.
Peyton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAY-tən
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #430 (up 9)
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "Pæga's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).
Peregrine
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEHR-ə-grin
Rating: 68% based on 8 votes
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
Per
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Breton
Pronounced: PAR(Swedish, Norwegian) PEW(Danish)
Rating: 34% based on 8 votes
Scandinavian and Breton form of Peter.
Payton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PAY-tən
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Variant of Peyton.
Paxton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PAK-stən
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #262 (down 10)
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "Pœcc's town". Pœcc is an Old English given name of unknown meaning.
Pax
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: PAKS(Latin, English)
Rating: 58% based on 10 votes
Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.
Pavlos
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Παύλος(Greek)
Pronounced: PAV-los
Rating: 38% based on 9 votes
Modern Greek form of Paul.
Pavlin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Павлин(Bulgarian)
Bulgarian form of Paulinus (see Paulino).
Patxi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: PA-chee
Rating: 31% based on 9 votes
Basque form of Francis.
Patryk
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: PA-trik
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
Polish form of Patricius (see Patrick).
Patrin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Means "leaf" in Romani.
Pasha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Паша(Russian)
Pronounced: PA-shə
Rating: 56% based on 8 votes
Diminutive of Pavel.
Paris 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πάρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PA-REES(Classical Greek) PAR-is(English) PEHR-is(English)
Rating: 68% based on 9 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly of Luwian or Hittite origin. In Greek mythology he was the Trojan prince who kidnapped Helen and began the Trojan War. Though presented as a somewhat of a coward in the Iliad, he did manage to slay the great hero Achilles. He was himself eventually slain in battle by Philoctetes.
Pallas 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πάλλας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAL-LAS(Classical Greek) PAL-əs(English)
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Possibly derived from Greek πάλλω (pallo) meaning "to brandish". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan and several other characters. It was also the name of a female character, though her name is probably from a different source (see Pallas 1).
Oliver
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
Rating: 76% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #3 (no change)
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as Alfher or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see Olaf). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

Olexiy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Олексій(Ukrainian)
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
Alternate transcription of Ukrainian Олексій (see Oleksiy).
Nolan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: NO-lən(English)
Rating: 60% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #61 (up 4)
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of Nuallán". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
Nikita 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Никита(Russian) Нікіта(Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: nyi-KYEE-tə(Russian)
Rating: 53% based on 9 votes
Russian form of Niketas. This form is also used in Ukrainian and Belarusian alongside the more traditional forms Mykyta and Mikita.
Nika 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Ника(Russian)
Russian short form of Veronika and other names ending in nika. It can also be a short form of Nikita 1 (masculine).
Nicholas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs, NIK-ləs
Popularity: the United States: #87 (down 9)
From the Greek name Νικόλαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and λαός (laos) meaning "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

Nevio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: NEH-vyo
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Italian form of the Roman family name Naevius, which was derived from Latin naevus "mole (on the body)". A famous bearer was the 3rd-century BC Roman poet Gnaeus Naevius.
Nemo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: NEE-mo(English)
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
Means "nobody" in Latin. This was the name used by author Jules Verne for the captain of the Nautilus in his novel Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870). It was later used for the title character (a fish) in the 2003 animated movie Finding Nemo.
Nazarenus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Latin form of Nazzareno.
Nazaire
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: NA-ZEHR
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
French form of Nazarius.
Natalius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Masculine form of Natalia (see Natalie).
Natalio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: na-TA-lyo
Masculine form of Natalia.
Naoise
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NEE-shə(Irish)
Rating: 50% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown, presumably of Gaelic origin. In Irish legend he was the young man who eloped with Deirdre, the beloved of Conchobhar the king of Ulster. Conchobhar eventually succeeded in having Naoise murdered, which caused Deirdre to die of grief.
Nala 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism
Other Scripts: नल(Sanskrit)
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Means "stem" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a king of the Nishadha people in the Hindu epic the Mahabharata.
Murray
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: MUR-ee
Rating: 46% based on 8 votes
From a surname, which is either Scottish or Irish in origin (see Murray 1 and Murray 2).
Mostyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 30% based on 9 votes
From a Welsh place name meaning "moss town" in Old English.
Morien
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian Romance, Morien was the son of Sir Aglovale and a Moorish princess.
Monday
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MUN-day
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
From the English word for the day of the week, which was derived from Old English mona "moon" and dæg "day". This was formerly given to girls born on Monday.
Moirean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish Gaelic (Rare)
Masculine derivative of Moire, the Scottish Gaelic name for the Virgin Mary.
Moana
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Maori, Hawaiian, Tahitian
Pronounced: mo-A-na(Hawaiian)
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Means "ocean, wide expanse of water, deep sea" in Maori and Hawaiian (as well as in other Polynesian languages).
Misha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Миша(Russian)
Pronounced: MYEE-shə
Rating: 63% based on 8 votes
Russian diminutive of Mikhail.
Miro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Short form of Miroslav.
Mircea
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: MEER-chya, MEER-cha
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Romanian form of Mirče. This name was borne by a 14th-century ruler of Wallachia.
Milo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: MIE-lo(English)
Rating: 72% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #134 (up 28)
Old Germanic form of Miles, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century [2].
Miles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ
Rating: 71% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #58 (up 17)
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

In Scotland this name was historically used as an Anglicized form of Maoilios.

Mihăiță
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian diminutive of Michael.
Micah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: מִיכָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIE-kə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #107 (up 3)
Contracted form of Micaiah. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. This is also the name of a separate person in the Book of Judges, the keeper of an idol. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
Merryn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown. This was the name of an early Cornish (male) saint.
Merripen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Romani name of uncertain origin and meaning. It might be derived from Romani miripen "manner; fashion" or else from Romani meriben or merapen meaning "death".
Meriful
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Meaning "full of merriment."
Meredith
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHR-ə-dith(English)
Rating: 62% based on 10 votes
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
Maxentius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Latin form of Maxence.
Maxence
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAK-SAHNS
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
French form of the Roman name Maxentius, a derivative of Latin maximus "greatest". This was the agnomen of an early 4th-century Roman emperor, a rival of Constantine. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint from Agde in France.
Matvey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Матвей(Russian)
Pronounced: mut-VYAY
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Russian form of Matthew.
Martyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Manx, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Мартин(Ukrainian)
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
Welsh, Manx and Ukrainian form of Martin.
Marlowe
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lo
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
Marley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lee
Popularity: the United States: #939 (up 62)
From a surname that was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
Markus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
Pronounced: MAR-kuws(German) MAR-kuys(Swedish) MAHR-koos(Finnish)
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
German, Scandinavian, Finnish and Estonian form of Marcus (see Mark).
Maris 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MEHR-is, MAR-is
Rating: 60% based on 10 votes
Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".
Marin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, French
Other Scripts: Марин(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ma-REEN(Romanian) MA-REHN(French)
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian and French form of Marinus.
Marián
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovak, Czech, Hungarian (Rare)
Pronounced: MA-ree-an(Slovak) MA-ri-yan(Czech) MAW-ree-an(Hungarian)
Slovak, Czech and Hungarian form of Marianus.
Marian 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, Czech, Romanian
Pronounced: MA-ryan(Polish) MA-ri-yan(Czech) ma-ree-AN(Romanian)
Polish, Czech and Romanian form of Marianus. It is sometimes used as a masculine form of Maria.
Marciano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: mar-THYA-no(European Spanish) mar-SYA-no(Latin American Spanish)
Portuguese, Spanish and Italian form of Marcianus.
Malte
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, German
Pronounced: MAL-tə(German)
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Short form of the Germanic name Helmold.
Maitland
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 29% based on 8 votes
From an English surname that was from a Norman French place name possibly meaning "inhospitable".
Maël
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: MA-EHL(French)
French form of Breton Mael, which was derived from a Celtic word meaning "chieftain" or "prince". Saint Mael was a 5th-century Breton hermit who lived in Wales.
Mădălin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Masculine form of Mădălina.
Macario
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ma-KA-ryo
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Spanish form of the Latin name Macarius, derived from the Greek name Μακάριος (Makarios), which was in turn derived from Greek μάκαρ (makar) meaning "blessed, happy". This was the name of several early saints.
Maarten
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: MAR-tən
Rating: 41% based on 8 votes
Dutch form of Martin.
Lumas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani, African American
Luken
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: LOO-kehn
Rating: 53% based on 8 votes
Basque form of Lucianus.
Lucian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, English
Pronounced: LOO-chyan(Romanian) LOO-shən(English)
Rating: 71% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #637 (up 26)
Romanian and English form of Lucianus. Lucian is the usual name of Lucianus of Samosata in English.
Lucan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Rating: 73% based on 9 votes
From the Roman cognomen Lucanus, which was derived from the name of the city of Luca in Tuscany (modern Lucca). Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, commonly called Lucan, was a 1st-century Roman poet.
Luca 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: LOO-ka
Rating: 74% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #67 (up 20)
Italian and Romanian form of Lucas (see Luke). This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
Lovrenc
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
Slovene form of Laurentius (see Laurence 1).
London
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LUN-dən
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #871 (down 38)
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
Llewyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Probably from the Welsh word llew meaning "lion", though it is not used as a name in Wales. It was used in the 2013 film 'Inside Llewyn Davis'.
Lev 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לֵב(Hebrew)
Rating: 65% based on 10 votes
Means "heart" in Hebrew.
Lestat
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: lə-STAT(English)
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Name used by author Anne Rice for a character in her Vampire Chronicles series of novels, first released in 1976, where it belongs to the French vampire Lestat de Lioncourt. Rice possibly intended the name to appear derived from Old French or Occitan l'estat "state, status", though apparently her husband's name Stan was inspiration.
Lennox
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: LEHN-əks
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #291 (up 40)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".
Leland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 52% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #471 (down 55)
From a surname, originally from an English place name, which meant "fallow land" in Old English. A famous bearer was the politician, businessman and Stanford University founder Leland Stanford (1824-1893).
Leandro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: leh-AN-dro(Spanish)
Rating: 66% based on 8 votes
Popularity: the United States: #641 (down 24)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Leander.
Leander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λέανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lee-AN-dər(English)
Rating: 74% based on 10 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Λέανδρος (Leandros), derived from λέων (leon) meaning "lion" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.
Lavrentios
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Λαυρέντιος(Greek)
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Greek form of Laurentius (see Laurence 1).
Larkin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Pronounced: LAHR-kin(English)
Rating: 39% based on 8 votes
Medieval diminutive of Laurence 1.
Lal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Nepali
Other Scripts: लाल(Hindi, Nepali)
Rating: 27% based on 9 votes
Means "boy" in Hindi, derived from Sanskrit लल (lala) meaning "playing, caressing".
Lachlan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LAKH-lən(Scottish) LAK-lən(English)
Rating: 60% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #701 (down 13)
Originally a Scottish nickname for a person who was from Norway. In Scotland, Norway was known as the "land of the lochs", or Lochlann. In the English-speaking world, this name was especially popular in Australia towards the end of the 20th century.
Kyrylo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Кирило(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: keh-RI-lo
Ukrainian form of Cyril.
Kyrilu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Кѷрилъ(Church Slavic)
Medieval Slavic form of Cyril.
Krishna
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Other Scripts: कृष्ण(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali) কৃষ্ণ(Bengali) કૃષ્ણ(Gujarati) కృష్ణ(Telugu) கிருஷ்ணா(Tamil) ಕೃಷ್ಣ(Kannada) കൃഷ്ണ(Malayalam)
Pronounced: KURSH-nu(Sanskrit) KRISH-nə(English)
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Means "black, dark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu god believed to be an incarnation of the god Vishnu. He was the youngest of King Vasudeva's eight children, six of whom were killed by King Kamsa because of a prophecy that a child of Vasudeva would kill Kamsa. Krishna however was saved and he eventually killed the king as well as performing many other great feats. In some Hindu traditions, Krishna is regarded as the supreme deity. He is usually depicted with blue skin.
Kolyan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Колян(Russian)
Diminutive of Nikolay.
Kiprian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Киприан(Russian)
Russian form of Cyprianus (see Cyprian).
Kip
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIP
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
From a nickname, probably from the English word kipper meaning "male salmon".
Kiley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
Rating: 27% based on 9 votes
Variant of Kylie.
Kieran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEER-ən(English) KEER-awn(English)
Rating: 85% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #516 (down 22)
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Keir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Rating: 60% based on 10 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Kerr.
Kaspar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Estonian
Pronounced: KAS-par(German)
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
German and Estonian form of Jasper.
Karsten
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Low German, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: KAR-stən(Low German) KAS-dən(Danish)
Low German form of Christian.
Kallias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Καλλίας(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 33% based on 9 votes
Derived from Greek κάλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty". This was the name of an Athenian who fought at Marathon who later became an ambassador to the Persians.
Juris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Latvian
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
Latvian form of George.
Jun 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 淳, 潤, 純, 順, etc.(Japanese Kanji) じゅん(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: JOON
From Japanese (jun) meaning "pure", (jun) meaning "moisture", (jun) meaning "pure, clean, simple", or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
Julian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən(English) JOOL-yən(English) YOO-lyan(Polish, German)
Rating: 64% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #34 (down 3)
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from Julius. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
Julen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: YOO-lehn
Basque form of Iulianus (see Julian).
Jude 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JOOD(English)
Rating: 78% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #154 (down 2)
Variant of Judas. It is used in many English versions of the New Testament to denote the second apostle named Judas, in order to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot. He was supposedly the author of the Epistle of Jude. In the English-speaking world, Jude has occasionally been used as a given name since the time of the Protestant Reformation.
Joss
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAWS
Rating: 55% based on 10 votes
Short form of Jocelyn.
Joscelin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Norman [1]
Rating: 43% based on 9 votes
Norman form of Jocelyn.
Jonas 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Lithuanian
Pronounced: YO-nus
Rating: 59% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #486 (down 34)
Lithuanian form of John.
Jonah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-nə(English)
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #128 (up 12)
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.

Jonah's story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the Hellenized form Jonas was occasionally used in England. The form Jonah did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation.

Jolyon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 9 votes
Medieval form of Julian. The author John Galsworthy used it for a character in his Forsyte Saga novels (published between 1906 and 1922).
Jehan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval French
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
Old French form of Iohannes (see John).
Jasper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
Rating: 81% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #138 (down 2)
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
Jaska
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: YAHS-kah
Rating: 49% based on 9 votes
Diminutive of Jaakko.
Jannick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
Danish diminutive of Jan 1.
James
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAYMZ(English)
Rating: 88% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #6 (no change)
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus, a variant of the Biblical Latin form Iacobus, from the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see Jacob). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

This name has been used in England since the 13th century, though it became more common in Scotland where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. In American name statistics (recorded since 1880) this name has never been out of the top 20, making it arguably the era's most consistently popular name. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States from 1940 to 1952.

Famous bearers include the English explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the Scottish inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the Irish novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

Jago
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
Cornish form of Jacob.
Ivaylo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ивайло(Bulgarian)
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
Perhaps derived from an old Bulgar name meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 13th-century emperor of Bulgaria. It is possible that this spelling was the result of a 15th-century misreading of his real name Vulo from historical documents.
Israel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish, English, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: יִשְׂרָאֵל(Hebrew) Ἰσραήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IZ-ray-əl(English) IZ-ree-əl(English) eez-ra-EHL(Spanish)
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #237 (down 3)
From the Hebrew name יִשְׂרָאֵל (Yisra'el) meaning "God contends", from the roots שָׂרָה (sarah) meaning "to contend, to fight" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament, Israel (who was formerly named Jacob; see Genesis 32:28) wrestles with an angel. The ancient and modern states of Israel took their names from him.
Ishmael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשְׁמָעֵאל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ISH-may-əl(English)
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name יִשְׁמָעֵאל (Yishma'el) meaning "God will hear", from the roots שָׁמַע (shama') meaning "to hear" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Abraham. He is the traditional ancestor of the Arab people. Also in the Old Testament, it is borne by a man who assassinates Gedaliah the governor of Judah. The author Herman Melville later used this name for the narrator in his novel Moby-Dick (1851).
Ingemar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: ING-eh-mar
From the Old Norse name Ingimárr, derived from the name of the Germanic god Ing combined with mærr "famous".
Indy 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: IN-dee(English)
Rating: 49% based on 9 votes
Diminutive of Indiana. This is the nickname of the hero of the Indiana Jones movies, starring Harrison Ford.
Indigo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: IN-di-go
Rating: 53% based on 10 votes
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ἰνδικὸν (Indikon) meaning "Indic, from India".
Imre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: EEM-reh
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
Hungarian form of Emmerich. This was the name of an 11th-century Hungarian saint, the son of Saint Istvan. He is also known as Emeric.
Ignatius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ig-NAY-shəs(English)
Rating: 66% based on 9 votes
From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by Emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.
Ignacio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: eegh-NA-thyo(European Spanish) eegh-NA-syo(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #0 (down 13)
Spanish form of Ignatius.
Ian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Rating: 62% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #83 (down 2)
Scottish form of John.
Iain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 57% based on 10 votes
Scottish form of John.
Hyacinth 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ὑάκινθος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HIE-ə-sinth(English)
Rating: 63% based on 9 votes
English form of Hyacinthus.
Hollis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-is
Rating: 66% based on 9 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.
Hendry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Scots variant of Henry.
Hadley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAD-lee
Rating: 30% based on 9 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "heather field" in Old English.
Gresham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: GRESH-əm
Rating: 36% based on 9 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "grazing homestead" in Old English.
Granville
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAN-vil
Rating: 28% based on 9 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman place name Grainville.
Graham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-əm(English) GRAM(English)
Rating: 52% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #184 (down 4)
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham [1]. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.
Gracjan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: GRA-tsyan
Polish form of Gratianus (see Gratian).
Gillespie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 36% based on 9 votes
Anglicized form of Scottish Gille Easbaig or Irish Giolla Easpuig both meaning "servant of the bishop".
Ghenadie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian form of Gennadius.
Flynn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLIN
Rating: 64% based on 10 votes
Popularity: the United States: #659 (up 57)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendant of Flann".
Floris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: FLO-ris
Rating: 49% based on 9 votes
Dutch form of Florentius (see Florence).
Florin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: flo-REEN
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
Romanian form of Florinus.
Florian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: FLO-ryan(German) FLAW-RYAHN(French) FLAW-ryan(Polish)
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
From the Roman cognomen Florianus, a derivative of Florus. This was the name of a short-lived Roman emperor of the 3rd century. It was also borne by Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
Florent
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FLAW-RAHN
Rating: 49% based on 9 votes
French masculine form of Florentius (see Florence).
Flannery
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLAN-ə-ree
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour". A famous bearer was American author Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964).
Fionnán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: FYI-nan
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Diminutive of Fionn. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
Fionán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: fyun-awn
Variant of Fionnán.
Finnán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 56% based on 9 votes
Older form of Fionnán.
Finn 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: FIN(English)
Rating: 67% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #178 (down 5)
Older Irish form of Fionn. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
Finlo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Manx form of Finlugh.
Finley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: FIN-lee(English)
Rating: 60% based on 9 votes
Popularity: the United States: #304 (down 18)
Anglicized form of Fionnlagh.
Fingal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 44% based on 10 votes
From Scottish Gaelic Fionnghall meaning "white stranger", derived from fionn "white, fair" and gall "stranger". This was the name of the hero in James Macpherson's 1762 epic poem Fingal [1], which he claimed to have based on early Gaelic legends about Fionn mac Cumhail.
Feodosiy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Феодосий(Russian)
Russian form of Theodosius.
Fennix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Felicjan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: feh-LYEE-tsyan
Polish form of Felicianus (see Feliciano).
Félicien
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FEH-LEE-SYEHN
Rating: 42% based on 9 votes
French form of Felicianus (see Feliciano).
Feliciano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: feh-lee-THYA-no(European Spanish) feh-lee-SYA-no(Latin American Spanish) feh-lee-CHA-no(Italian)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of the Roman name Felicianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name Felix. It was borne by a number of early saints, including a 3rd-century bishop of Foligno.
Feidhlim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: FEH-lim
Rating: 30% based on 9 votes
Variant of Feidlimid.
Ezra
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EHZ-rə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #44 (up 5)
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.
Evgeniy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Евгений(Russian)
Pronounced: yiv-GYEH-nyee, iv-GYEH-nyee
Alternate transcription of Russian Евгений (see Yevgeniy).
Evgeni
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Russian
Other Scripts: Евгени(Bulgarian) Евгений(Russian)
Pronounced: yiv-GYEH-nyee(Russian) iv-GYEH-nyee(Russian)
Rating: 48% based on 9 votes
Bulgarian form of Eugene and an alternate transcription of Russian Евгений (see Yevgeniy).
Evelyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EHV-ə-lin(English) EEV-lin(British English) EEV-ə-lin(British English) EH-və-leen(German)
Rating: 53% based on 9 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Aveline. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
Evander 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər, ə-VAN-dər
Rating: 70% based on 11 votes
Anglicized form of Iomhar.
Étienne
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-TYEHN(European French) EH-TSYEHN(Quebec French)
Rating: 45% based on 10 votes
French form of Stephen.
Esmond
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHZ-mənd
Rating: 39% based on 10 votes
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
Esme
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: EHZ-may, EHZ-mee
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
Variant of Esmé.
Esmé
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: EHZ-may, EHZ-mee
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century. It is now more common as a feminine name.
Erasyl
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Ерасыл(Kazakh)
Means "noble hero" in Kazakh.
Enzo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: EHN-tso
Rating: 50% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #173 (up 45)
The meaning of this name is uncertain. In some cases it seems to be an old Italian form of Heinz, though in other cases it could be a variant of the Germanic name Anzo. In modern times it is also used as a short form of names ending in enzo, such as Vincenzo or Lorenzo.
Emrys
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 61% based on 12 votes
Welsh form of Ambrose. Emrys Wledig (or Ambrosius Aurelianus) was a Romano-British military leader who fought against the invading Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century. Tales of his life were used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth to create the character of Merlin, who he called Merlinus Ambrosius or Myrddin Emrys.
Emlyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 40% based on 12 votes
Probably from the name of an ancient region in Wales, its name meaning "around the valley". It has also been suggested that this name is a Welsh form of Aemilianus (see Emiliano).
Emilian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: ehn-MYEE-lyan(Polish)
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Romanian and Polish form of Aemilianus (see Emiliano).
Emery
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-ree
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #738 (down 1)
Norman form of Emmerich. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, now typically feminine, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
Émeric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EHM-REEK
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
French form of Emmerich.
Emerens
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Rating: 36% based on 12 votes
Dutch form of Emerentius.
Elvio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of Helvius.
Ellis 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: EHL-is
Rating: 75% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #325 (up 17)
Anglicized form of Elisedd.
Ellery
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-ree
Rating: 36% based on 12 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from the medieval masculine name Hilary.
Elisha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִישַׁע(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-shə(English)
Popularity: the United States: #837 (down 88)
From the Hebrew name אֱלִישַׁע ('Elisha'), a contracted form of אֱלִישׁוּעַ ('Elishu'a) meaning "my God is salvation". According to the Old Testament, Elisha was a prophet and miracle worker. He was the attendant of Elijah and succeeded him after his ascension to heaven.
Elijah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-jə(English) i-LIE-zhə(English)
Rating: 72% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #4 (up 1)
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is Yahweh", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

Eliav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִיאָב(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of Eliab.
Elias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Dutch, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλίας(Greek) Ἠλίας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEE-ush(European Portuguese) eh-LEE-us(Brazilian Portuguese) eh-LEE-as(German) EH-lee-ahs(Finnish) i-LIE-əs(English) ee-LIE-əs(English)
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #53 (up 7)
Form of Elijah used in several languages. This is also the form used in the Greek New Testament.
Elián
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #355 (up 11)
In the case of Elián Gonzalez (1993-) it is a combination of Elizabeth and Juan 1, the names of his parents.
Eben
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 38% based on 13 votes
Short form of Ebenezer.
Dzvonimir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ѕвонимир(Macedonian)
Rating: 37% based on 12 votes
Macedonian form of Zvonimir.
Dorin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: DO-reen
Romanian, possibly a form of Dorian or a diminutive of Teodor.
Dorian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Romanian
Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən(English) DAW-RYAHN(French)
Rating: 65% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #511 (down 2)
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.
Dominic
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHM-i-nik
Rating: 62% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #88 (down 3)
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.
Djuro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian
Other Scripts: Ђуро(Serbian)
Rating: 30% based on 12 votes
Alternate transcription of Serbian Ђуро (see Đuro).
Dimitrie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Moldovan
Variant of Demetrius.
Desislav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Десислав(Bulgarian)
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Derived from Slavic elements, possibly deseti meaning "ten", combined with slava "glory".
Denver
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHN-vər
Rating: 30% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #527 (up 112)
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "Dane ford" in Old English. This is the name of the capital city of Colorado, which was named for the politician James W. Denver (1817-1892).
Dashiell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: də-SHEEL, DASH-il
Rating: 49% based on 12 votes
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) it was from his mother's surname, which was possibly an Anglicized form of French de Chiel, of unknown meaning.
D'Artagnan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 42% based on 12 votes
Means "from Artagnan" in French, Artagnan being a town in southwest France. This was the name of a character in the novel The Three Musketeers (1884) by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel D'Artagnan is an aspiring musketeer who first duels with the three title characters and then becomes their friend.
Dariy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Дарий(Russian) Дарій(Ukrainian)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Darius.
Darius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: də-RIE-əs(English) DAR-ee-əs(English)
Popularity: the United States: #591 (down 23)
Roman form of Δαρεῖος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush meaning "possessing goodness", composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.

It has never been very common as a given name in the English-speaking world, though it rose in popularity after the middle of the 20th century. In Lithuania it may be given in honour of the Lithuanian-American aviator Steponas Darius (1896-1933), who died attempting to fly nonstop from New York to Lithuania. His surname was an Americanized form of the original Darašius.

Dario
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Croatian
Pronounced: DA-ryo(Italian) DA-ree-o(Croatian)
Popularity: the United States: #820 (up 116)
Italian form of Darius.
Darcy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-see
Rating: 60% based on 12 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from the town of Arcy in La Manche, France. This is the surname of a character, Fitzwilliam Darcy, in Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice (1813).
Dameron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Possibly from the surname Dameron.
Dagfinn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 37% based on 12 votes
From the Old Norse name Dagfinnr, which was composed of the elements dagr "day" and finnr "Sámi, person from Finland".
Dacián
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: da-SYAN(Latin American Spanish) da-THYAN(European Spanish)
Spanish form of Dacian.
Cyryl
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: TSI-ril
Rating: 39% based on 12 votes
Polish form of Cyril.
Cyril
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: SIR-əl(English) SEE-REEL(French) TSI-ril(Czech)
Rating: 44% based on 12 votes
From the Greek name Κύριλλος (Kyrillos), which was derived from Greek κύριος (kyrios) meaning "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.

This name was borne by a number of important saints, including Cyril of Jerusalem, a 4th-century bishop and Doctor of the Church, and Cyril of Alexandria, a 5th-century theologian. Another Saint Cyril was a 9th-century linguist and a Greek missionary to the Slavs. The Cyrillic alphabet, which is still used today, was created by him and his brother Methodius in order to translate the Bible into Slavic, and thus this name has been especially popular in Eastern Christianity. It came into general use in England in the 19th century.

Cyprian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: TSI-pryan(Polish) SIP-ree-ən(English)
From the Roman family name Cyprianus, which meant "from Cyprus". Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.
Crispus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Roman cognomen meaning "curly-haired" in Latin.
Crispin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-pin
Rating: 59% based on 12 votes
From the Roman cognomen Crispinus, which was derived from the name Crispus. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
Costică
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: kos-TEE-kə
Romanian diminutive of Constantin.
Cosmo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: KAHZ-mo(English)
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Italian variant of Cosimo. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
Cosmin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: KOS-meen
Romanian form of Cosmas.
Cosmas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κοσμᾶς(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
From the Greek name Κοσμᾶς (Kosmas), which was derived from κόσμος (kosmos) meaning "order, decency". Saint Cosmas was martyred with his twin brother Damian in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians.
Corneliu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: kor-NEH-lyoo
Romanian form of Cornelius.
Cormac
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 57% based on 12 votes
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.
Corentin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton, French
Pronounced: KAW-RAHN-TEHN(French)
Rating: 51% based on 12 votes
Possibly means "hurricane" in Breton. This was the name of a 5th-century bishop of Quimper in Brittany.
Cooper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOO-pər
Rating: 34% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #74 (up 6)
From a surname meaning "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
Conrad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: KAHN-rad(English) KAWN-rat(German)
Popularity: the United States: #548 (down 23)
Means "brave counsel", derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
Clement
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHM-ənt
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
Clare
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHR, KLAR
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Medieval English form of Clara. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was itself probably derived from Irish clár meaning "plank, level surface".
Clair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLEHR
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
French form of Clarus (see Clara).
Ciríaco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: thee-REE-a-ko(European Spanish) see-REE-a-ko(Latin American Spanish)
Portuguese form and Spanish variant of Cyriacus.
Ciprian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: chee-pree-AN
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Romanian form of Cyprianus (see Cyprian).
Chelsey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: CHEHL-see
Rating: 28% based on 12 votes
Variant of Chelsea.
Charlot
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SHAR-LO
Rating: 30% based on 12 votes
French diminutive of Charles.
Cebrián
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: theh-BRYAN(European Spanish) seh-BRYAN(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 37% based on 12 votes
Spanish form of Cyprianus (see Cyprian).
Catriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare), Spanish (Latin American)
Other Scripts: כתריאל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: kaht-ree-EL(Hebrew)
Variant of Katriel.
Cătălin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: kə-tə-LEEN
Romanian masculine form of Katherine.
Castiel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Judeo-Christian Legend, Popular Culture
Pronounced: CAS-tee-el
Rating: 46% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #893 (down 170)
Means "shield of God" in Hebrew via El theophory in the Bible, which is the practice of embedding the name of a god or a deity in, usually, a proper name. Castiel is sometimes considered a variant of Cassiel. The name Castiel does not appear in the Bible, nor does it appear until around the 13th century. Later texts say Castiel is an angel who presides over Thursdays, and it is likely he came to be based on an older mythological character (likely Cassiel).

In the CW television show 'Supernatural', Castiel is the name of a protagonist portrayed by actor Misha Collins. Castiel is an angel who befriends the main protagonists Sam and Dean Winchester. Modern usage of the name may be due to this character.

Caspian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən(English)
Rating: 77% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #763 (up 25)
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his Chronicles of Narnia series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.
Caspar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Rating: 76% based on 13 votes
Latin variant of Jasper.
Cas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: KAHS
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
Short form of Casper.
Carmi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: כַּרְמִי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAHR-mie(English)
Rating: 28% based on 12 votes
Means "vine" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Reuben in the Old Testament.
Carlu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Corsican
Corsican form of Charles.
Carbrey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAHR-bree
Rating: 35% based on 12 votes
Anglicized form of Cairbre.
Caradoc
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: ka-RA-dawk
Rating: 51% based on 13 votes
Variant of Caradog.
Camlo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Derived from the Romani word kamlo "dear; beloved; gentle; beautiful".
Calixte
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KA-LEEKST
Rating: 37% based on 12 votes
French form of Calixtus.
Călin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: kə-LEEN
Directly taken from Romanian călin "guelder rose (a type of flower)".
Caius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: GA-ee-oos(Latin) KIE-əs(English)
Roman variant of Gaius.
Cairbre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAHR-bra
Rating: 29% based on 12 votes
Means "charioteer" in Irish. This was the name of two semi-legendary high kings of Ireland.
Caian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Caerwyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 39% based on 12 votes
Derived from the Welsh elements caer "fortress" and gwyn "white, fair".
Cadfael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Means "battle prince" from Welsh cad "battle" and mael "prince".
Brynn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIN
Rating: 58% based on 12 votes
Feminine variant of Bryn.
Brynmor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
From the Welsh place name Brynmawr meaning "great hill".
Bruno
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Latvian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: BROO-no(German, Italian, Spanish, Czech) BROO-noo(Portuguese) BRUY-NO(French) BROO-naw(Polish, Slovak)
Rating: 58% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #709 (up 3)
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged to Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
Brooks
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWKS
Rating: 36% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #91 (up 18)
From an English surname, a variant of Brook.
Brooklyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRUWK-lən
From the name of a borough of New York City, originally named after the Dutch town of Breukelen, itself meaning either "broken land" (from Dutch breuk) or "marsh land" (from Dutch broek). It can also be viewed as a combination of Brook and the popular name suffix lyn. It is considered a feminine name in the United States, but is more common as a masculine name in the United Kingdom.
Bronte
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRAHN-tee
Rating: 40% based on 12 votes
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic. The Brontë sisters - Charlotte, Emily, and Anne - were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντή meaning "thunder".
Briar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #755 (up 19)
From the English word for the thorny plant.
Brennus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Gaulish (Latinized)
Pronounced: BREHN-əs(English)
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
Brencis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Latvian (Rare)
Short form of Labrencis, used as a given name in its own right.
Borna
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian
Derived from the Slavic element borti meaning "fight, battle".
Blair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: BLEHR(English)
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
From a Scottish surname that is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
Berwyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 36% based on 11 votes
Means "fair head" from the Welsh elements barr "head" and gwyn "white, fair".
Berislav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements birati "to take, to gather" (in an inflected form) and slava "glory".
Benoît
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BU-NWA
Rating: 47% based on 12 votes
French form of Benedict.
Benedict
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHN-ə-dikt
Rating: 72% based on 14 votes
From the Late Latin name Benedictus, which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American general Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who defected to Britain during the American Revolution.
Béla
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: BEH-law
Rating: 42% based on 12 votes
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be derived from Hungarian bél meaning "guts, bowel" or Slavic бѣлъ (belu) meaning "white". This was the name of four Hungarian kings.
Bedivere
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Rating: 42% based on 12 votes
From the Welsh name Bedwyr, which is of unknown meaning. In Arthurian legends Bedivere was one of the original companions of King Arthur. He first appears in early Welsh tales, and his story was later expanded by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century. He is the one who throws the sword Excalibur into the lake at the request of the dying Arthur.
Beckett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BEHK-it
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
Popularity: the United States: #209 (up 6)
From an English surname that could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
Beathan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: BYA-han
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Derived from Scottish Gaelic beatha meaning "life".
Bazyli
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish (Rare)
Pronounced: ba-ZI-lyee
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
Polish form of Basil 1.
Basil 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAZ-əl
Rating: 60% based on 11 votes
From the Greek name Βασίλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλεύς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
Basha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish, Yiddish
Pronounced: BAH-shah
Personal remark: Nickname for Sebastian
Yiddish form of Batya.
Barthélémy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BAR-TEH-LEH-MEE
French form of Bartholomew.
Barclay
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: BAHR-klee(English)
Rating: 43% based on 13 votes
From a Scottish surname that was likely derived from the English place name Berkeley, meaning "birch wood" in Old English.
Balian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval French, French (Modern, Rare), German (Modern, Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: BA-li-an(German) BAY-lee-ən(Popular Culture)
Meaning uncertain. This is most known for being the name of Balian of Ibelin (c. 1140-1193), a lord of the Crusader state of Jerusalem.

The name was re-popularised through the Ridley Scott film Kingdom of Heaven (2005).

Bailey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAY-lee
Rating: 59% based on 11 votes
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
Avedis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Ավետիս(Armenian)
Western Armenian transcription of Avetis.
Aurelius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ow-REH-lee-oos(Latin) aw-REEL-ee-əs(English)
Roman family name that was derived from Latin aureus meaning "golden, gilded". Marcus Aurelius was a 2nd-century Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints.
Aurélien
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-REH-LYEHN
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
French form of Aurelianus.
Aurel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, German (Rare)
Pronounced: ow-REHL(German)
Romanian and German form of Aurelius.
Aulay
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 35% based on 12 votes
Anglicized form of Amhlaidh.
Augustine 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-gə-steen, aw-GUS-tin
Rating: 71% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #711 (up 19)
From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name Augustus. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.
August
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English
Pronounced: OW-guwst(German) OW-goost(Polish) OW-guyst(Swedish) AW-gəst(English)
Rating: 66% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #155 (up 12)
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of Augustus. This was the name of three Polish kings.

As an English name it can also derive from the month of August, which was named for the Roman emperor Augustus.

Aubrey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWB-ree
Rating: 42% based on 12 votes
Norman French form of the Germanic name Alberich. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song Aubrey along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
Atticus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀττικός(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 67% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #300 (up 9)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀττικός (Attikos) meaning "from Attica", referring to the region surrounding Athens in Greece. This name was borne by a few notable Greeks from the Roman period (or Romans of Greek background). The author Harper Lee used the name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) for an Alabama lawyer who defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
Athelstan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 32% based on 12 votes
Modern form of Æðelstan. This name was revived in Britain the latter half of the 19th century.
Atanasije
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian
Other Scripts: Атанасије(Serbian)
Serbian form of Athanasius.
Atanas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Атанас(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Athanasius.
Astrophel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Probably intended to mean "star lover", from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star" and φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This name was first used by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney in his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella.
Ashton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ASH-tən
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #136 (down 11)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name that meant "ash tree town" in Old English.
Ashriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Rating: 32% based on 12 votes
Variant of Azrael.
Asher
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ASH-ər(English)
Rating: 52% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #32 (up 11)
Means "happy, blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob by Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. The meaning of his name is explained in Genesis 30:13.
Ascelin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Derived from a diminutive of the Germanic element asc meaning "ash tree".
Asael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Greek
Pronounced: AHZ si ehl
Biblical Greek form of Asahel.
Arseniy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Арсений(Russian)
Pronounced: ur-SYEH-nyee
Russian form of Arsenios.
Arsenio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ar-SEH-nyo
Rating: 35% based on 12 votes
Spanish and Italian form of Arsenios.
Arkady
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аркадий(Russian)
Pronounced: ur-KA-dyee
Rating: 45% based on 12 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Аркадий (see Arkadiy).
Aris 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Diminutive of Adriaan.
Ariel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, French, Spanish, Polish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֲרִיאֵל(Hebrew) Ἀριήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-ree-EHL(Hebrew) EHR-ee-əl(English) AR-ee-əl(English) A-RYEHL(French) a-RYEHL(Spanish) A-ryehl(Polish)
Rating: 46% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #565 (down 17)
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew, from אֲרִי ('ari) meaning "lion" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play The Tempest (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Disney film The Little Mermaid (1989).
Arcadius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀρκάδιος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Arkadios.
Ante 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 35% based on 13 votes
Croatian form of Anthony.
Anikita
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аникита(Russian)
Form of Aniketos/Anicetus.
Aneurin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 45% based on 13 votes
Variant of Aneirin.
Anders
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: AN-desh(Swedish) AHN-nəsh(Norwegian) AHN-us(Danish)
Rating: 63% based on 12 votes
Popularity: the United States: #830 (up 84)
Scandinavian form of Andreas (see Andrew). A famous bearer was the Swedish physicist Anders Jonas Ångström (1814-1874).
Anastasiy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Archaic), Bulgarian (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Анастасий(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: u-nu-STA-syee(Russian)
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Older Russian and Bulgarian form of Anastasius.
Anastasio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: a-na-STA-zyo(Italian) a-na-STA-syo(Spanish)
Rating: 46% based on 12 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Anastasius.
Anastas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Анастас(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: a-na-STAS(Bulgarian)
Rating: 40% based on 12 votes
Russian and Bulgarian form of Anastasius.
Anaiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲנָיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 34% based on 12 votes
Means "Yahweh has answered" in Hebrew. This is the name of a minor character in the Old Testament.
Amyntas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀμύντας(Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek ἀμύντωρ (amyntor) meaning "defender". This was the name of several kings of Macedon.
Amyas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of Amis. Alternatively, it may come from a surname that originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
Aminta
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Form of Amyntas used by the Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his play Aminta (1573). In the play Aminta is a shepherd who falls in love with a nymph.
Amerigo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-meh-REE-go
Medieval Italian form of Emmerich. Amerigo Vespucci (1451-1512) was the Italian explorer who gave the continent of America its name (from Americus, the Latin form of his name).
America
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-MEHR-i-kə
Rating: 28% based on 14 votes
In the English-speaking world, this name is usually given in reference to the United States of America (see Amerigo). It came into use as an American name in the 19th century.
Amédée
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MEH-DEH
French form of Amadeus.
Ambrosius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀμβρόσιος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Ambrosios.
Ambrose
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
Rating: 71% based on 13 votes
Popularity: the United States: #820 (up 138)
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Ἀμβρόσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
Ambroise
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AHN-BRWAZ
French form of Ambrosius (see Ambrose).
Ambriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Rating: 44% based on 14 votes
Allegedly means "energy of God" in Hebrew. In Jewish and Christian mythology, this is the name of an angel associated with the zodiacal sign of Gemini and the month of May. It was found engraved on a Hebrew amulet for warding off evil.
Amadeus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ahm-ə-DAY-əs(English) ahm-ə-DEE-əs(English)
Rating: 61% based on 16 votes
Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.
Aloisio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Aloysius.
Alexis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Greek, Spanish, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αλέξης(Greek) Ἄλεξις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-LEHK-SEE(French) ə-LEHK-sis(English)
Rating: 67% based on 16 votes
Popularity: the United States: #483 (down 33)
From the Greek name Ἄλεξις (Alexis) meaning "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Ἀλέξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
Alexie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian masculine form of Alexis.
Alexian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
English form of Alexianus.
Alexandre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Pronounced: A-LUG-ZAHNDR(French) u-li-SHUNN-dri(European Portuguese) a-leh-SHUN-dree(Brazilian Portuguese) a-leh-SHAN-dreh(Galician) ə-lək-SAN-drə(Catalan)
Rating: 63% based on 15 votes
Form of Alexander in several languages. This name was borne by the 19th-century French author Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), who wrote The Three Musketeers.
Alexander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀλέξανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-ig-ZAN-dər(English) a-leh-KSAN-du(German) a-lehk-SAHN-dər(Dutch) a-lehk-SAN-dehr(Swedish) A-lehk-san-tehr(Icelandic) AW-lehk-sawn-dehr(Hungarian) A-lehk-san-dehr(Slovak)
Rating: 84% based on 19 votes
Popularity: the United States: #10 (up 1)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀλέξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, help" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, king of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

Alessio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-LEHS-syo
Rating: 51% based on 15 votes
Italian form of Alexis.
Aleksey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Алексей(Russian)
Pronounced: u-lyi-KSYAY
Rating: 69% based on 16 votes
Russian form of Alexis. This was the name of a 17th-century czar of Russia.
Alastair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: AL-i-stər(English)
Rating: 78% based on 17 votes
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Alasdair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 72% based on 18 votes
Scottish form of Alexander.
Alaric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-ə-rik(English)
Rating: 69% based on 18 votes
Popularity: the United States: #820 (up 57)
From the Gothic name Alareiks, which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
Akiva
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲקִיבָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-KEE-vah
From an Aramaic form of Yaakov. Akiva (or Akiba) ben Joseph was a prominent 1st-century Jewish rabbi.
Adriël
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: AH:-drhee-el
Rating: 50% based on 17 votes
Popularity: the United States: #140 (up 45)
Dutch form of Adriel.
Adonis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἄδωνις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-DAW-NEES(Classical Greek) ə-DAHN-is(English) ə-DO-nis(English)
Rating: 39% based on 17 votes
Popularity: the United States: #222 (up 20)
From Phoenician adon meaning "lord". In Greek myth Adonis was a handsome young shepherd killed while hunting a wild boar. The anemone flower is said to have sprung from his blood. Because he was loved by Aphrodite, Zeus allowed him to be restored to life for part of each year. The Greeks borrowed this character from Semitic traditions, originally Sumerian (see Dumuzi).
Adlai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עַדְלָי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AD-lay(English)
Rating: 45% based on 16 votes
Contracted form of Adalia. This is the name of the father of one of King David's herdsmen in the Old Testament.
Adelin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), Finnish (Rare), Medieval French, Romanian, Lengadocian, Gascon, Niçard
Scandinavian feminine variant of Adelina, Romanian, Languedocian, Niçard and Gascon masculine form of Adelina and medieval French masculine form of Adeline.
Addison
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AD-i-sən
Rating: 46% based on 18 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Adam". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
Adair
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-DEHR
Rating: 59% based on 18 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Edgar.
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