Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the relationship is from different language.
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MELÁNIE   f   Czech
Czech form of MELANIE.
MELANIE   f   English, German, Dutch
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.... [more]
MELCHOL   f   Biblical Greek
Biblical Greek form of MICHAL (2).
MELE   f   Hawaiian
Means "song" in Hawaiian. This name is also used as a Hawaiian and Samoan form of MARY.
MELICENT   f   English (Archaic)
Older form of MILLICENT.
MELIKA   f   Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of MELISSA.
MELİKE   f   Turkish
Turkish form of MALIKA.
MÉLINA   f   French
French form of MELINA.
MELINA   f   English, Greek
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as MELISSA or from Greek μελι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.
MELINDA   f   English, Hungarian
Combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the popular name suffix inda. It was created in the 18th century, and may have been inspired by the similar name Belinda. In Hungary, the name was popularized by the 1819 play 'Bánk Bán' by József Katona.
MÉLINE   f   French
French form of MELINA.
MELİS   f   Turkish
Turkish form of MELISSA.
MELİSA   f   Turkish
Turkish form of MELISSA.
MELISA   f   Spanish, Bosnian
Spanish and Bosnian form of MELISSA.
MELISENDE   f   Medieval French
Old French form of MILLICENT.
MÉLISSA   f   French
French form of MELISSA.
MELISSA   f   English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "bee" in Greek. This was the name of a nymph that cared for young Zeus in Greek mythology. It is also the name of the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina in Ludovico Ariosto's poem 'Orlando Furioso' (1516). As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
MELITTA   f   Ancient Greek, German
Ancient Attic Greek variant of MELISSA.
MERAB (1)   f   Biblical
Means "abundant" in Hebrew. This was the name of a daughter of Saul in the Old Testament.
MERCÉDESZ   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of MERCEDES.
MERE   f   Maori
Maori form of MARY.
MERERID   f   Welsh
Welsh form of MARGARET.
MERI (2)   f   Georgian
Georgian form of MARIE.
MERIEL   f   English (Archaic)
Variant of MURIEL.
MEROB   f   Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of MERAB (1) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
MERVE   f   Turkish
Turkish form of MARWA.
MERYEM   f   Turkish, Uyghur
Turkish and Uyghur form of Miriam (see MARY).
MIA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MICAELA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICAIAH   m & f   Biblical
Means "who is like YAHWEH?" in Hebrew. This name occurs in the Old Testament belonging to both males and females.
MICHAELA   f   German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHAL (2)   f   Biblical, Hebrew
Possibly means "brook" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Saul. She was married to David, but after David fled from Saul he remarried her to someone else. Later, when David became king, he ordered her returned to him.
MICHELLE   f   French, English, Dutch
French feminine form of MICHEL. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century.
MICHOL   f   Biblical Latin
Biblical Latin form of MICHAL (2).
MIEN   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of WILHELMINA.
MIIA   f   Finnish
Finnish form of MIA.
MILA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILADA   f   Czech
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear". It has become associated with Czech mladý "young".
MILDA   f   Lithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of love.
MILÉNA   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of MILENA.
MILENA   f   Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian
Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.
MILICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious". It was originally a diminutive of names that began with that element.
MILKA (1)   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILLICENT   f   English
From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.
MINA (1)   f   English, Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel 'Dracula' (1897) by Bram Stoker.
MINA (2)   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil
Means "fish" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the daughter of the Hindu goddess Ushas as well as the daughter of the god Kubera.
MINAKSHI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
From Sanskrit मीन (mina) meaning "fish" and अक्षि (akshi) meaning "eye". This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
MINERVA   f   Roman Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MINKE   m & f   Frisian, Dutch
Diminutive and feminine form of MEINE.
MINODORA   f   Romanian
Romanian form of MENODORA.
MIRA (2)   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Polish
Short form of names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIRANDA   f   English, Dutch
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearian character.
MIREIA   f   Catalan, Spanish
Catalan form of Mirèio (see MIREILLE).
MIREILLE   f   French
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem 'Mirèio' (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".
MIRELA   f   Romanian, Croatian
Romanian and Croatian form of MIREILLE.
MIRELE   f   Yiddish
Yiddish diminutive of MIRIAM.
MIRELLA   f   Italian
Italian form of MIREILLE.
MIREN   f   Basque
Basque form of MARIA.
MIRIAM   f   Hebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.
MIRJAMI   f   Finnish
Finnish form of MIRIAM.
MIRJANA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene
Possibly a form of MIRIAM.
MITRA (1)   m & f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "friend" in Sanskrit, a cognate of MITHRA. This is a transcription of both the feminine form मित्रा and the masculine form मित्र, which is the name of a Hindu god of friendship and contracts who appears in the Rigveda.
MITRODORA   f   Macedonian
Macedonian form of METRODORA.
MODESTA   f   Spanish, Late Roman
Feminine form of MODESTUS.
MODESTE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of MODESTUS.
MOHINI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "infatuating" in Sanskrit. This was the name adopted by the Hindu god Vishnu when he took the form of a woman.
MOIRA   f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
MOIRREY   f   Manx
Manx form of MARY.
MONA (1)   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").
MÓNICA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of MONICA.
MÒNICA   f   Catalan
Catalan form of MONICA.
MÔNICA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of MONICA.
MONICA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
MÓNIKA   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of MONICA.
MONIQUE   f   French, English, Dutch
French form of MONICA.
MÓR   f   Scottish, Irish
Means "great" in Gaelic. It is sometimes translated into English as SARAH.
MORANA   f   Slavic Mythology, Croatian
From a Slavic root meaning "death, plague". In Slavic mythology this was the name of the goddess of winter and death.
MOREEN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of MÓIRÍN. It is sometimes used as a variant of MAUREEN.
MORGAN (1)   m & f   Welsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MORGANE   f   French
French, either a form of MORGAN (2) or a feminine form of MORGAN (1).
MORIAH   f   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English (Modern)
Possibly means "seen by YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This is a place name in the Old Testament, both the land where Abraham is to sacrifice Isaac and the mountain upon which Solomon builds the temple. They may be the same place. Since the 1980s it has occasionally been used as a feminine given name in America.
MORNA   f   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of MUIRNE.
MORTA   f   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of MARTHA.
MORWENNA   f   Cornish, Welsh
Means "maiden" in Cornish (related to the Welsh word morwyn). This was the name of a 6th-century Cornish saint.
MOYNA   f   Irish, Scottish
Variant of MONA (1).
MUIREALL   f   Scottish
Scottish form of MUIRGEL.
MÜMİNE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of MUMIN.
MÜNİRE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of MUNIR.
MURIEL   f   English, French, Irish
Medieval English form of a Celtic name which was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel 'John Halifax, Gentleman' (1856).
MURRON   f   Scottish
Scottish form of MUIRENN.
MYLÈNE   f   French
Contraction of MARIE and HÉLÈNE. It can also be used as a French form of MILENA.
MYRGJÖL   f   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of MUIRGEL.
MYRIAM   f   French
French form of MIRIAM.
NAAMAH   f   Biblical, Hebrew
Means "pleasant" in Hebrew. This name is borne in the Old Testament by both a daughter of Lamech and a wife of Solomon. Some later Jewish texts give Naamah as the name of Noah's wife, even though she is not named in the Old Testament.
NADÈGE   f   French
French form of NADEZHDA.
NADĚŽDA   f   Czech
Czech form of NADEZHDA.
NADEŽDA   f   Slovak, Serbian, Latvian
Slovak, Serbian and Latvian form of NADEZHDA.
NADIA (1)   f   French, Italian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the Western world, as well as a variant transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).
NADINE   f   French, German, English
French elaborated form of NADIA (1).
NADİRE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of NADIR.
NADİYE   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NADIYYA.
NADJA   f   German, Slovene
German and Slovene form of NADYA (1).
NAİLE   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NAILA.
NAİME   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of NA'IM.
NAINSÍ   f   Irish
Irish form of NANCY.
NAIRA   f   Native American, Quechua, Aymara
Means "big eyes" in Quechua and Aymara.
NANDAG   f   Scottish
Scottish diminutive of ANNA.
NANNA (1)   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Norse nanþ meaning "daring, brave". In Norse legend she was a goddess who died of grief when her husband Balder was killed.
NAOMI (1)   f   English, Hebrew, Biblical
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara (see Ruth 1:20).... [more]
NARCISA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NARCISSE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of NARCISSUS. This is also the French word for the narcissus flower.
NASIM   m & f   Arabic, Urdu
Means "breeze" in Arabic.
NASRIN   f   Persian, Bengali
Means "wild rose" in Persian.
NATACHA   f   French, Portuguese
French and Portuguese form of NATASHA.
NATALI   f   Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of NATALIE.
NATÁLIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIA   f   Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Georgian, Late Roman
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATÁLIE   f   Czech
Czech form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIE   f   English, German
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
NATĀLIJA   f   Latvian
Latvian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIJA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIYA   f   Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALYA   f   Russian
Russian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATAŠA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of NATASHA.
NATASHA   f   Russian, English
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
NATASZA   f   Polish
Polish form of NATASHA.
NATHÁLIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATHALIE   f   French, German
French form and German variant of NATALIE.
NATISHA   f   African American (Rare)
Variant of NATASHA, probably modeled on LATISHA.
NAYARA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of NAIARA.
NAZLI   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NAZLI. This name is spelled with a Turkish dotless i, as Nazlı.
NEA   f   Swedish, Finnish
Short form of LINNÉA.
NEBİLE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of NABIL.
NEDA (2)   f   Persian
Persian form of NIDA.
NÉLIDA   f   Literature, Spanish
Created by French author Marie d'Agoult for her semi-autobiographical novel 'Nélida' (1846), written under the name Daniel Stern. It was probably an anagram of her pen name DANIEL.
NENSI   f   Croatian
Croatian form of NANCY.
NERTHUS   f   Germanic Mythology
Latinized form of Nerþuz, the Germanic (feminine) equivalent of Njörðr (see NJORD). Nerthus was a Germanic goddess of fertility as described by the Roman historian Tacitus in the 1st century.
NES   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of AGNES.
NESİM   m & f   Turkish
Turkish form of NASIM.
NESRİN   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NASRIN.
NEST   f   Welsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NESTA   f   Welsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NESTAN   f   Georgian
From the first part of NESTAN-DAREJAN.
NESTANI   f   Georgian
From the second part of NESTAN-DAREJAN.
NEVRA   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NAWRA.
NEŽA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of AGNES.
NEZİHE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of NAZIH.
NGAWANG   m & f   Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "powerful speech" in Tibetan, from ངག (ngag) meaning "speech" and དབང (dbang) meaning "power, force".
NIA (1)   f   Welsh
Welsh form of NIAMH.
NICOL (2)   f   Dutch, German, Czech
Dutch, German and Czech variant of NICOLE.
NICOLA (2)   f   German, Czech, English
Latinate feminine form of NICHOLAS. In the English-speaking world this name is more common outside of America, where Nicole is more usual.
NICOLE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of NICHOLAS, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).
NICOLET   f   Dutch
Dutch feminine form of NICHOLAS.
NİDA   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NIDA.
NIDA   f   Arabic, Urdu
Means "call, proclaim" in Arabic.
NIENKE   f   Frisian
Frisian diminutive of KATHERINE.
NIKOL   f   Czech, Bulgarian
Czech and Bulgarian form of NICOLE.
NIKOLA (2)   f   German, Polish, Czech, Slovak
German, Polish, Czech and Slovak feminine form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLETT   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of NICOLETTE.
NIKOLETTA   f   Hungarian, Greek
Hungarian and Greek form of NICOLETTA.
NIKORA   m & f   Maori
Maori form of NICHOLAS or NICOLE.
NILOFAR   f   Indian (Muslim)
Indian form of NILOOFAR.
NILOFER   f   Indian (Muslim)
Indian form of NILOOFAR.
NİLÜFER   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NILOFER.
NİMET   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NIMAT.
NINA (1)   f   Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NINA (4)   f   Russian
Russian form of NINO (2).
NINE   f   Frisian
Frisian short form of KATHERINE.
NINO (2)   f   Ancient Near Eastern (Hellenized), Georgian
Meaning unknown, possibly related to the masculine name NINOS. Saint Nino (sometimes called Nina) was a woman from Asia Minor who introduced Christianity to Georgia in the 4th century.
NISHAT   m & f   Arabic, Bengali
Means "energetic, lively" in Arabic.
NIVES   f   Italian, Croatian
Italian form of NIEVES.
NOA (1)   f   Hebrew, Biblical
Hebrew form of NOAH (2).
NOAH (2)   f   Biblical
Derived from the Hebrew name נֹעָה (No'ah) meaning "motion". In the Old Testament this is the name of a daughter of Zelophehad.
NOELA   f   Galician
Galician feminine form of NOËL.
NOELIA   f   Spanish
Spanish feminine form of NOËL.
NOËLLE   f   French, Dutch
Feminine form of NOËL.
NOELLE   f   English
English form of NOËLLE.
NOÉMI   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of NAOMI (1).
NOEMI   f   Italian, German, Czech, Biblical Latin
Italian, German and Czech form of NAOMI (1).
NOEMÍ   f   Spanish
Spanish form of NAOMI (1).
NOÉMIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of NAOMI (1).
NOÊMIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of NAOMI (1).
NOÉMIE   f   French
French form of NAOMI (1).
NOEMIN   f   Biblical Greek
Form of NAOMI (1) used in the Greek Old Testament.
NOGAH   m & f   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "brightness" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of King David in the Old Testament. In modern times it is sometimes used as a feminine name.
NOHEMI   f   Spanish
Spanish form of NAOMI (1).
NONA (2)   f   English, Ancient Roman (Rare)
Feminine form of NONUS. It was also used in 19th-century England, derived directly from Latin nonus "ninth" and traditionally given to the ninth-born child.
NONNA   f   Russian
Russian form of NONA (2).
NOOR (2)   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of ELEONORA.
NOORTJE   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch diminutive of ELEONORA.
NORMA   f   English, Italian, Literature
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera 'Norma' (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
NUR   f & m   Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Uyghur, Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition النور (al-Nur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
NÚRIA   f   Catalan, Portuguese
From a Catalan title of the Virgin Mary, Nostra Senyora de Núria, meaning "Our Lady of Nuria". Nuria is a sanctuary in Spain in which there is a shrine containing a famous statue of Mary.
NURIA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of NÚRIA.
NURUL   m & f   Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
First part of compound Arabic names beginning with نور ال (Nur al) meaning "light of the" (such as نور الدين (Nur al-Din) "light of religion").
NYDIA   f   English (Rare), Spanish, Literature
Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel 'The Last Days of Pompeii' (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".
NYNKE   f   Frisian
Frisian diminutive of KATHERINE.
NYREE   f   English (New Zealand)
Anglicized form of NGAIRE. It was borne by New Zealand actress Nyree Dawn Porter (1936-2001).
OANEZ   f   Breton
Derived from Breton oan "lamb" (ultimately from Latin agnus) and used as a Breton form of AGNES.
OCTÁVIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OCTAVIA.
OCTAVIA   f   English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
ODA   f   German, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Odo (see OTTO).
ODALIS   f & m   Spanish
Spanish form of ODILIA.
ODELIA   f   English
Form of ODILIA.
ODESSA   f   Various
From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.
ODETA   f   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ODETTE.
ODETTA   f   English (Rare)
Latinate form of ODETTE.
ODETTE   f   French
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet 'Swan Lake' (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.
ODILE   f   French
French form of ODILIA.
ODILIE   f   German (Archaic)
Variant of ODILIA.
OFÉLIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OPHELIA.
OFELIA   f   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of OPHELIA.
OILI   f   Finnish
Finnish form of OLGA.
OKSANA   f   Ukrainian, Russian
Ukrainian form of XENIA.
OLALLA   f   Spanish
Spanish variant of EULALIA. This was the name of two 4th-century saints from Spain.
OLEKSANDRA   f   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of ALEXANDRA.
OLENA   f   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of HELEN.
OĽGA   f   Slovak
Slovak form of OLGA.
OLGA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLGICA   f   Macedonian, Serbian
Macedonian and Serbian diminutive of OLGA.
OLHA   f   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of OLGA.
OLÍVIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of OLIVIA.
OLIVIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
OLIVIE   f   French (Rare), Czech (Rare)
French and Czech form of OLIVIA.
OLIWIA   f   Polish
Polish form of OLIVIA.
OLYMPE   f   French
French form of OLYMPIAS.
OLYMPIA   f   Greek, Slovak
Feminine form of OLYMPOS.
ONA (1)   f   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ANNA.
ONDINA   f   Portuguese, Italian
Portuguese and Italian form of UNDINE.
OONA   f   Irish, Finnish
Irish variant and Finnish form of ÚNA.
OPHELIA   f   English, Literature
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem 'Arcadia'. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play 'Hamlet' (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
OPHÉLIE   f   French
French form of OPHELIA.
OPRAH   f   Various
In the case of television personality Oprah Winfrey, it was a childhood mispronunciation of her real name ORPAH that became permanent.
ORALEE   f   English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of AURÉLIE.
ORALIE   f   English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of AURÉLIE.
ORIA   f   Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Aurea which was derived from Latin aureus "golden". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Ostia (near Rome), as well as an 11th-century Spanish saint.
ORIANA   f   Italian, Spanish
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.
ORIANE   f   French
French form of ORIANA.
ORIANNE   f   French
French form of ORIANA.
ORPAH   f   Biblical
Means "back of the neck" in Hebrew. Orpah was Naomi's second daughter-in-law in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament.
ORPHA   f   Biblical, English
Variant of ORPAH used in some translations of the Bible.
ORSOLA   f   Italian
Italian form of URSULA.
ORSOLYA   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of URSULA.
ORTRUN   f   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements ort "point" and run "secret".
OSANNE   f   French (Rare)
French form of OSANNA.
OTÁVIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of OCTAVIA.
OTILIA   f   Romanian
Romanian form of ODILIA.
OTTAVIA   f   Italian
Italian form of OCTAVIA.
OTTILIA   f   Swedish
Swedish form of ODILIA.
OTTILIE   f   German
German form of ODILIA.
OTTOLINE   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of OTTILIE. A famous bearer was the British socialite Lady Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938).
OTYLIA   f   Polish
Polish form of ODILIA.
ØYDIS   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of EYDÍS.
PAAIE   f   Manx
Manx form of PEGGY.
PADMA   f & m   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the feminine form पद्मा and the masculine form पद्म. According to Hindu tradition a lotus holding the god Brahma arose from the navel of the god Vishnu. The name Padma is used in Hindu texts to refer to several characters, including the goddess Lakshmi and the hero Rama.
PÁLA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic feminine form of PAUL.
PAOLA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian feminine form of PAUL.
PAOLINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PARASKEVA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of PARASKEVE.
PARVANA   f   Azerbaijani, Persian
Azerbaijani form of PARVANEH. It can also be a Persian variant transcription of the same name.
PARVATI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "of the mountains" in Sanskrit. Parvati is a Hindu goddess of love and power, the wife of Shiva and the mother of Ganesha.
PARVIN   f   Persian, Azerbaijani
Means "the Pleiades" in Persian. The Pleiades are a group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
PASSANG   m & f   Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "good, excellent" in Tibetan.
PATIME   f   Uyghur
Uyghur form of FATIMAH.
PATRICE (2)   f   English
Variant of PATRICIA.
PATRÍCIA   f   Slovak, Portuguese, Hungarian
Slovak, Portuguese and Hungarian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRICIA   f   English, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK). In medieval England this spelling appears in Latin documents, but this form was probably not used as the actual name until the 18th century, in Scotland.
PATRICIE   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRICIJA   f   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRIZIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRYCJA   f   Polish
Polish feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PÀULA   f   Sardinian
Sardinian feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL).
PAULA   f   German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
PAULE   f   French
French feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL).
PAULIEN   f   Dutch
Dutch feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAULIINA   f   Finnish
Finnish form of PAULINA.
PAULÍNA   f   Slovak
Slovak form of PAULINA.
PAULINA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Swedish, Lithuanian, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAULINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAVLA   f   Czech, Slovene
Czech and Slovene feminine form of PAUL.
PAVLINA   f   Czech, Slovene, Macedonian
Czech, Slovene and Macedonian form of PAULINA.
PEIGI   f   Scottish
Scottish diminutive of MARGARET.
PELAGIA   f   Ancient Greek, Greek, Polish
Feminine form of PELAGIUS. This was the name of a few early saints, including a young 4th-century martyr who threw herself from a rooftop in Antioch rather than lose her virginity.
PELAGIYA   f   Russian
Russian form of PELAGIA.
PEMA   m & f   Tibetan, Bhutanese
Tibetan form of PADMA.
PÉNÉLOPE   f   French
French form of PENELOPE.
PENELOPE   f   Greek Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PERİ   f   Turkish
Turkish form of PARI.
PERNILLA   f   Swedish
Swedish short form of PETRONILLA.
PERNILLE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of PETRONILLA.
PERPÉTUA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of PERPETUA.
PERPETUA   f   Spanish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin perpetuus meaning "continuous". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred with another woman named Felicity.
PERSIS   f   Biblical, Biblical Greek
Greek name meaning "Persian woman". This was the name of a woman mentioned in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament.
PERVİN   f   Turkish
Turkish form of PARVIN.
PETRONA   f   Spanish
Possibly a feminine form of PETRONIUS.
PETRONEL   f   English (Archaic)
Medieval English form of PETRONILLA.
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