Names with "saint" in Description

This is a list of names in which the description contains the keyword saint.
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ABBÁNmIrish
Means "little abbot", derived from Irish abb "abbot" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint, the son of King Cormac of Leinster.
ACHAICUSmBiblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Αχαικος (Achaikos), which referred to the region in Greece called Αχαια (Achaia), situated on the northern coast of the Peloponnese. In the New Testament this is the name of a Corinthian Christian who aids Saint Paul.
ACHILLESmGreek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek Αχιλλευς (Achilleus) which is of unknown meaning, perhaps derived from Greek αχος (achos) "pain" or else from the name of the Achelous River. This was the name of a warrior in Greek legend, one of the central characters in Homer's 'Iliad'. The bravest of the Greek heroes in the war against the Trojans, he was eventually killed by an arrow to his heel, the only vulnerable part of his body.... [more]
ADALBERTmAncient Germanic, German, Polish
Old Germanic form of ALBERT. This is the name of a patron saint of Bohemia, Poland and Prussia.
ADALHARDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and hard "brave, hardy". Saint Adalhard or Adalard was a cousin of Charlemagne who became a abbot of Corbie.
ADELAfEnglish, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element adal meaning "noble". Saint Adela was a 7th-century Frankish princess who founded a monastery at Pfazel in France. This name was also borne by a daughter of William the Conqueror.
ADELAIDEfEnglish, Italian, Portuguese
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ADEODATUSmLate Roman
Latin name meaning "given by God". This was the name of a son of Saint Augustine and two popes (who are also known by the related name Deusdedit).
ADRIANmEnglish, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
ÆLFHEAHmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high". This was the name of an 11th-century archbishop of Canterbury, a saint and martyr, who is commonly known as Alphege or Elphege.
ÆLREDmAnglo-Saxon
Contracted form of ÆÐELRÆD. This was the name of a 12th-century English saint.
ÆÐELBERHTmAnglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalbert (see ALBERT). This was the name of a Saxon king of England and two kings of Kent, one of whom was a saint. It became unused after the Normans introduced their form of Adalbert after their invasion.
ÆÐELWINEmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and wine "friend". This name became rare after the Norman conquest. Saint Æðelwine was a 7th-century bishop of Lindsey, England.
AFRA (1)fLate Roman
Originally used by the Romans as a nickname for a woman from Africa. This was the name of two early saints.
ÁFRICAfSpanish
Spanish form of AFRICA (1). It is usually taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de África, the patron saint of the Spanish enclave of Ceuta in North Africa.
AGAPEfGreek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek αγαπη (agape) meaning "love". This name was borne by at least two early saints.
AGAPIOSmGreek, Ancient Greek
Masculine form of AGAPE. This was the name of a saint from Caesarea who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian.
AGATHAfEnglish, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αγαθη (Agathe), derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
AGATHANGELOSmLate Greek
Means "bearer of good news", derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) "good" and αγγελος (angelos) "messenger, angel". Saint Agathangelus of Rome was a 4th-century deacon who was martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian.
AGILULFmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and wulf "wolf". This name was borne by a 6th-century king of the Lombards and by an 8th-century bishop of Cologne and saint.
AGLAIAfGreek Mythology, Greek
Means "splendour, beauty" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites). This name was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Rome.
AGNESfEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
AGRIPPINAfAncient Roman
Feminine derivative of AGRIPPA. This name was borne by the scheming mother of the Roman emperor Nero, who eventually had her killed. This was also the name of a 3rd-century Roman saint who is venerated in Sicily.
AILBHEf & mIrish
Possibly derived from the old Gaelic root albho meaning "white". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint.
AKAKIOSmGreek, Ancient Greek
From a Greek word meaning "innocent, not evil", derived from α (a), a negative prefix, combined with κακη (kake) "evil". This was the name of three early saints, two of whom were martyred.
ALBANmGerman, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Albanus which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALBINAfRussian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBINUS. Saint Albina was a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
ALBINUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was a derivative of ALBUS. Saint Albinus (also called Aubin) was a 6th-century bishop of Angers in Brittany.
ALDEBRANDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements ald meaning "old" and brand meaning "sword" or "fire". Saint Aldebrand was a 12th-century bishop of Fossombrone in Italy.
ALDEGUNDfAncient Germanic
Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and gund "war". Saint Algegund (or Aldegundis) was a 7th-century Frankish abbess.
ALDRICmFrench, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and ric "ruler, power". Saint Aldric was a 9th-century bishop of Le Mans.
ALEXANDRAfEnglish, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXISm & fGerman, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALEXIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξιος (Alexios), a derivative of Αλεξις (see ALEXIS). This was the name of five Byzantine emperors. It was also borne by a 5th-century Syrian saint who is especially venerated in the Eastern Church.
ALMUDENAfSpanish
Derived from Arabic المدينة (al-mudaynah) meaning "the citadel". It was in a building by this name that a concealed statue of the Virgin Mary was discovered during the Reconquista in Madrid. The Virgin of Almudena, that is Mary, is the patron saint of Madrid.
ALODIAfAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Possibly from a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements alja "other, foreign" and aud "riches, wealth". Saint Alodia was a 9th-century Spanish martyr with her sister Nunilo.
ALOYSIUSmEnglish
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.
ALPHONSUSmHistory
Latinized form of ALFONSO. This name was borne by Saint Alphonsus Liguori, an 18th-century Italian bishop who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church.
AMABILISmLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "lovable". Saint Amabilis was a 5th-century priest in Riom, central France.
AMANDUSmLate Roman
Derived from Latin amanda meaning "lovable, worthy of love". Saint Amandus was a 5th-century bishop of Bordeaux. It was also borne by a 7th-century French saint who evangelized in Flanders.
AMANTIUSmLate Roman
Means "loving" in Latin. This was the name of several early saints. It has sometimes been confused with the name Amandus.
AMATORmLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "lover (of God)". Saint Amator was a 5th-century bishop of Auxerre.
AMATUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "beloved". The 7th-century Saint Amatus was the first abbot of Remiremont Abbey.
AMBROSEmEnglish
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
AMPELIOmItalian
Italian form of Ampelius, the Latin form of the Greek name Αμπελιος (Ampelios), which was derived from αμπελος (ampelos) meaning "vine". Saint Ampelius was a 7th-century bishop of Milan.
ANARGYROSmGreek
From the Greek term αναργυρος (anargyros) meaning "poor, incorruptible", derived from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with αργυρος (argyros) "silver". This term referred to saints who did not accept payment for their services.
ANASTASIAfGreek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANASTASIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αναστασιος (Anastasios) which meant "resurrection" from Greek αναστασις (anastasis) (composed of the elements ανα (ana) "up" and στασις (stasis) "standing"). This was the name of numerous early saints and martyrs, including a 7th-century monk and writer from Alexandria who is especially venerated in the Eastern Church.
ANATOLIAfLate Roman
Feminine form of ANATOLIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century Italian saint and martyr.
ANATOLIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek Ανατολιος (Anatolios), derived from ανατολη (anatole) meaning "sunrise". Saint Anatolius was a 3rd-century philosopher from Alexandria.
ANDREWmEnglish, Biblical
English form of the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), which was derived from ανδρειος (andreios) "manly, masculine", a derivative of ανηρ (aner) "man". In the New Testament the apostle Andrew, the first disciple to join Jesus, is the brother of Simon Peter. According to tradition, he later preached in the Black Sea region, with some legends saying he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. Andrew, being a Greek name, was probably only a nickname or a translation of his real Hebrew name, which is not known.... [more]
ANFISAfRussian
Russian form of the Greek name Ανθουσα (Anthousa), which was derived from Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower". This was the name of a 9th-century Byzantine saint.
ANNAfEnglish, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANSELMmGerman, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.
ANSGARmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and ger "spear". Saint Ansgar was a 9th-century missionary who tried to convert the Danes and Norwegians.
ANTHELMmAncient Germanic
From the Germanic element and "wrath, zeal" combined with helm "helmet, protection". Saint Anthelm was a 12th-century bishop of Belley in France.
ANTHONYmEnglish
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).... [more]
ANTONINOmItalian
Italian form of the Roman name Antoninus, which was derived from Antonius (see ANTHONY). There were several early saints named Antoninus, including the patron saint of Sorrento. This was also the name of a 2nd-century Roman emperor.
AODHÁNmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
From the old Irish name Áedán, a diminutive of Áed (see AODH). This was the name of an Irish monk and saint of the 7th century. It was also borne by several characters in Irish mythology.
AOIBHEANNfIrish
Means "beautiful sheen" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of the mother of Saint Enda. It was also borne by Irish royalty.
APOLLINARISmAncient Greek
Ancient Greek name derived from the name of the god APOLLO. This was the name of several early saints and martyrs, including a bishop of Ravenna and a bishop of Hierapolis.
APOLLONIAfAncient Greek, Italian
Feminine form of APOLLONIOS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr from Alexandria.
APOLLONIOSmAncient Greek
From an ancient Greek personal name which was derived from the name of the Greek god APOLLO. It was borne by a Greek poet of the 3rd century BC. Several saints have also had this name.
AQUILINAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of AQUILINUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Byblos.
ARACELIfSpanish
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
ARISTIDESmAncient Greek (Latinized), Spanish, Portuguese
From the Greek name Αριστειδης (Aristeides), derived from αριστος (aristos) "best" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This name was borne by the 5th-century BC Athenian statesman Aristides the Just, who was renowned for his integrity. It was also the name of a 2nd-century saint.
ARKADIOSmAncient Greek
From an ancient Greek name meaning "of Arcadia". Arcadia was a region in Greece, its name deriving from αρκτος (arktos) "bear". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr.
ARMELmFrench
From the old Welsh name Arthfael, which was composed of the elements arth "bear" and mael "prince". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded abbeys in Brittany.
ARNOLDmEnglish, German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
ARSENIOSmAncient Greek
Means "virile" in Greek. Saint Arsenius was a 5th-century deacon who was tutor to the two sons of the Roman emperor Theodosius. The two sons, Arcadius and Honorius, divided the empire into eastern and western halves upon their father's death.
ARTEMIOSmAncient Greek
From an ancient Greek name which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess ARTEMIS. This was the name of a 4th-century general in the Roman army who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church.
ATHANASIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αθανασιος (Athanasios) meaning "immortal", from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with θανατος (thanatos) "death". Saint Athanasius was a 4th-century bishop of Alexandria who strongly opposed Arianism.
AUDREYfEnglish
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
AUGUSTINE (1)mEnglish
From the Roman name Augustinus, itself derived from the Roman name AUGUSTUS. Saint Augustine of Hippo was a 5th-century Christian theologian and author from North Africa. For his contributions to Christian philosophy he is known as a Doctor of the Church. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world. It became popular in England in the Middle Ages partly because of a second saint by this name, Augustine of Canterbury, a 6th-century Italian monk sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons.
AUREAfLate Roman
Late Latin name which was derived from aureus "golden". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Ostia (near Rome), as well as an 11th-century Spanish saint.
AURELIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from Latin aureus "golden, gilded". Marcus Aurelius was a 2nd-century Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints.
AUXENTIOSmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek αυξανω (auxano) meaning "to increase, to grow". This name was borne by a few early saints.
AVA (3)fGerman, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish saint. It was also borne by a 12th-century poet from Melk, Austria.
AVILAfAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". This name is also given in honour of the 16th-century mystic Saint Teresa of Ávila, Ávila being the name of the town in Spain where she was born.
AVILIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning. Saint Avilius was a 1st-century patriarch of Alexandria.
AVITUSmAncient Roman
From a Roman family name which meant "ancestral" in Latin. This was the name of an emperor who briefly reigned over the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century. It was also the name of several saints, including a 6th-century bishop of Vienne.
BABYLASmLate Greek, French (Rare)
Derived from the name of the ancient Mesopotamian city of Babylon. Saint Babylas was a 3rd-century patriarch of Antioch who was martyred during the reign of the Roman emperor Decius.
BADEMUSmHistory
Latinized form of a Persian name of unknown meaning. Saint Bademus was a 4th-century Persian martyr who was a victim of Shapur II's persecutions.
BALBINAfSpanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare), Ancient Roman
Feminine form of BALBINUS. Saint Balbina was a 2nd-century Roman woman martyred with her father Quirinus.
BAPTISTmGerman
German form of BAPTISTE. It is often paired with the name Johann, in honour of Saint John the Baptist.
BAPTISTEmFrench
Means "baptist" in French, originally deriving from Greek βαπτω (bapto) "to dip". This name is usually given in honour of Saint John the Baptist, and as such it is often paired with the name Jean.
BARBARAfEnglish, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BARLAAMmJudeo-Christian Legend
Meaning unknown. In Christian legends Barlaam (recorded as Greek Βαρλααμ) was a 3rd-century hermit who converted Josaphat, the son of an Indian king, to Christianity. The story is based on that of the Buddha. This name was also borne by two saints.
BARTHOLOMEWmEnglish, Biblical
From Βαρθολομαιος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.
BASIL (1)mEnglish
From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios) which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
BAUDELIOmSpanish
From Baudelius, a Latinized form of a possibly Germanic name. Saint Baudelius was a 3rd-century saint and martyr from Orleans.
BEATAfPolish, German, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
BEATRIXfGerman, Hungarian, Dutch, English, Late Roman
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed, happy". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.... [more]
BEATUSmLate Roman
Masculine form of BEATA. According to legend, Saint Beatus was ordained a priest by Saint Peter and evangelized in Switzerland. Another saint by this name was an 8th-century Asturian theologian.
BEDEmHistory
Modern form of the Old English name Baeda, possibly related to Old English bed "prayer". Saint Bede, called the Venerable Bede, was an 8th-century historian, scholar and Doctor of the Church.
BENEDICTmEnglish
From the Late Latin name Benedictus which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American general Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who defected to Britain during the American Revolution.
BENIGNOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of the Late Latin name Benignus which meant "kind, friendly" in Latin. This was the name of several saints including a 5th-century disciple of Saint Patrick who later became the chief Bishop of Ireland.
BERACHmIrish
Derived from Gaelic biorach meaning "sharp". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
BERARDmAncient Germanic
Variant of BERNARD using the related root bera "bear" as the first element. This was the name of a 13th-century saint who was martyred in Morocco.
BERNADETTEfFrench, English
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.
BERNARDmEnglish, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BESSARIONmLate Greek
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Greek βησσα (bessa) "wooded valley". This was the name of a 5th-century Egyptian hermit who was a disciple of Saint Anthony the Great. It was later adopted by the scholar Basilios Bessarion (1403-1472), a Greek born in Byzantine Anatolia who became a Roman Catholic bishop.
BIDZINAmGeorgian
Possibly from Georgian ბიძა (bidza) meaning "uncle". This was the name of a 17th-century Georgian saint and martyr.
BIRGITTAfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish
Most likely a Scandinavian form of BRIDGET via the Latinized form Brigitta. Alternatively it could be a feminine derivative of BIRGER. This is the name of the patron saint of Europe, Birgitta of Sweden, the 14th-century founder of the Bridgettine nuns. Her father's name was Birger.
BLAINEmEnglish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name Bláán, which meant "yellow" in Gaelic. Saint Bláán was a 6th-century missionary to the Picts.
BLANDINEfFrench
French form of the Roman name Blandina, which was the feminine form of Blandinus, which was itself a derivative of the cognomen BLANDUS. Saint Blandina was a 2nd-century slave from Lyons who was martyred by being thrown to wild beasts.
BOJANmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic element boji meaning "battle". This was the name of a 9th-century Bulgarian saint.
BONAVENTURAmItalian
Means "good fortune" in Italian. Saint Bonaventura was a 13th-century Franciscan monk who is considered a Doctor of the Church.
BONIFACEmFrench, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Bonifatius, which meant "good fate" from bonum "good" and fatum "fate". This was the name of nine popes and also several saints, including an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary to Germany (originally named Winfrid) who is now regarded as the patron saint of that country. It came into use in England during the Middle Ages, but became rare after the Protestant Reformation.
BONITUSmLate Roman
Derived from a diminutive of Latin bonus meaning "good". This was the name of a 7th-century century saint, a bishop of Auvergne.
BORISmBulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BRENDANmIrish, English
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRICEmFrench, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
BRIDGETfIrish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BROGANm & fIrish
Derived from Gaelic bróg "shoe" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
BRÓNACHfIrish
Derived from Irish Gaelic brón meaning "sorrow". Saint Brónach was a 6th-century mystic from Ireland.
BRUNOmGerman, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
BURKHARDmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements burg meaning "protection" and hard "brave, hardy". Saint Burkhard was a bishop who founded several monasteries in Germany in the 8th century.
CADFANmWelsh
Means "battle peak" from Welsh cad "battle" and ban "peak". Saint Cadfan, from Brittany, was a 6th-century missionary to Wales.
CADOCmWelsh
Derived from Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
CADWALADERmWelsh
Means "leader of the battle" from Welsh cad "battle" and gwaladr "leader". This was the name of a Welsh saint of the 7th century.
CAEDMONmHistory
Meaning unknown, though the first element is likely connected to Brythonic caed meaning "battle". Saint Caedmon was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon poet who supposedly received his poetic inspiration from a dream. Our only knowledge of him is through the historian Bede.
CAESARIUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name which was derived from CAESAR. Saint Caesarius was a 6th-century bishop of Arles.
CALLISTUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name which was derived from the Greek name Καλλιστος (Kallistos) "most beautiful". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callixtus), including the 3rd-century Callistus I who is regarded as a saint.
CALOGEROmItalian
From the Late Latin name Calogerus which meant "beautiful elder" from Greek καλος (kalos) "beautiful" and γερων (geron) "old man, elder". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a hermit of Sicily.
CAMILLUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen, which is probably of Etruscan origin and unknown meaning. It is probably not related to Latin camillus "a youth employed in religious services". This name was borne by the 16th-century Italian monk Saint Camillus de Lellis.
CANDIDAfLate Roman, English
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter. As an English name, it came into use after George Bernard Shaw's play 'Candida' (1898).
CANDIDUSmLate Roman
Masculine form of CANDIDA. This name was borne by a few early saints and martyrs.
CAOILFHIONNfIrish
Derived from the Gaelic elements caol "slender" and fionn "fair". This was the name of several Irish saints.
CAOMHÁNmAncient Irish
Diminutive of CAOMH. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CARINA (1)fEnglish, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CÁRTHACHmIrish
Means "loving" in Irish. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CASIMIRmEnglish, French
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.
CASSIANmAncient Roman (Anglicized)
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from CASSIUS. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
CASSIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin cassus "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CATHALmIrish
Derived from the Gaelic elements cath "battle" and val "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
CECILmEnglish
From the Roman name Caecilius (see CECILIA). This was the name of a 3rd-century saint, a companion of Saint Cyprian. Though it was in use during the Middle Ages in England, it did not become common until the 19th century when it was given in honour of the noble Cecil family, who had been prominent since the 16th century. Their surname was derived from the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of SEXTUS.
CECILIAfEnglish, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CELSUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which meant "tall" in Latin. This was the name of a 2nd-century philosopher who wrote against Christianity. It was also borne by an early saint martyred with Nazarius in Milan.
CHADmEnglish
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CHANTALfFrench, English, Dutch
From a French surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".
CHIARAfItalian
Italian form of CLARA. Saint Chiara (commonly called Saint Clare in English) was a follower of Saint Francis of Assisi.
CHRISTINAfEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.
CHRISTOPHERmEnglish
From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing CHRIST", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.... [more]
CHRYSANTHOSmGreek, Ancient Greek
Means "golden flower" from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) "golden" combined with ανθος (anthos) "flower". This name was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century Egyptian saint.
CIANÁNmIrish
Diminutive of CIAN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.
CIARA (1)fIrish
Feminine form of CIAR. Saint Ciara was an Irish nun who established a monastery at Kilkeary in the 7th century.
CIARÁNmIrish
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.
CILLIANmIrish
Probably from Gaelic ceall "church" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who evangelized in Franconia. He was martyred in Würzburg.
CLARAfItalian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLARUSmLate Roman
Masculine Latin form of CLARA. This was the name of several early saints.
CLAUDEm & fFrench, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLAUDIUSmAncient Roman
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin claudus meaning "lame, crippled". This was the name of a patrician family prominent in Roman politics. The ancestor of the family was said to have been a 6th-century BC Sabine leader named Attius Clausus, who adopted the name Appius Claudius upon becoming a Roman citizen. The family produced several Roman emperors of the 1st century, including the emperor known simply as Claudius. He was poisoned by his wife Agrippina in order to bring her son Nero (Claudius's stepson) to power. The name was later borne by several early saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Besançon.
CLEMENTmEnglish
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius) which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
CLETUSmEnglish
Short form of ANACLETUS. This name is sometimes used to refer to the third pope, Saint Anacletus. It can also function an an Anglicized form of KLEITOS.
CLÍMACOmSpanish
Spanish form of Climacus, derived from Greek κλιμαξ (klimax) "ladder". The 7th-century monk Saint John Climacus (also known as John of the Ladder) acquired this name because he wrote a book called 'The Ladder of Divine Ascent'.
CLOTILDEfFrench, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
COLETTEfFrench
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).
COLMÁNmIrish
Diminutive of Colm (see COLUM). This was the name of a large number of Irish saints.
COLUMBAm & fLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
COLUMBANmIrish
Possibly an Irish diminutive of COLUMBA. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columban of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.
COLUMBANUSmLate Roman
This name can be viewed as a derivative of COLUMBA or a Latinized form of COLUMBAN, both derivations being approximately equivalent. This is the name of Saint Columban in Latin sources.
CONLETHmIrish
Modern form of the old Irish name Conláed, possibly meaning "chaste fire" from Gaelic connla "chaste" and aodh "fire". Saint Conláed was a 5th-century bishop of Kildare.
CONRADmEnglish, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CORDULAfGerman
Late Latin name meaning "heart" from Latin cor, cordis. Saint Cordula was one of the 4th-century companions of Saint Ursula.
CORNELIUSmAncient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
CORONAfLate Roman, Italian, Spanish
Means "crown" in Latin, as well as Italian and Spanish. This was the name of a 2nd-century saint who was martyred with her companion Victor.
CORRADOmItalian
Italian form of CONRAD. This was a 14th-century saint from Piacenza, Italy.
COSMASmAncient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κοσμας (Kosmas), which was derived from κοσμος (kosmos) meaning "order, decency". Saint Cosmas was martyred with his twin brother Damian in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians.
CRESCENTIUSmLate Roman
Latin name which was a derivative of the name CRESCENS. Saint Crescentius was a child martyred in Rome during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century.
CRISPINmEnglish (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Crispinus which was derived from the name CRISPUS. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
CUIMÍNmIrish
Possibly from Celtic cam meaning "bent, crooked". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
CUTHBERTmEnglish (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
CYNEBURGfAnglo-Saxon
Means "royal fortress" from Old English cyne "royal" and burg "fortress". Saint Cyneburga, a daughter of a king of Mercia, was the founder of an abbey at Gloucester in the 7th century.
CYPRIANmPolish, English (Rare)
From the Roman family name Cyprianus which meant "from Cyprus" in Latin. Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.
CYRAfHistory
Meaning unknown. Saint Cyra was a 5th-century Syrian hermit who was martyred with her companion Marana.
CYRIACUSmLate Roman
Latinized form of the Greek name Κυριακος (Kyriakos), which meant "of the lord" (derived from Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord"). This was the name of a few early saints.
CYRILmEnglish, French, Czech, Slovak
From the Greek name Κυριλλος (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (kyrios) meaning "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.... [more]
DAMARISfBiblical, Biblical Greek
Probably means "calf, heifer, girl" from Greek δαμαλις (damalis). In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul.
DAMIANmEnglish, Polish, Dutch
From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.
DARA (1)mIrish
From the Irish Mac Dara which means "oak tree". This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara. It is also used as an Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARIAfItalian, Polish, Romanian, English, Croatian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of DARIUS. Saint Daria was a 3rd-century Greek woman who was martyred with her husband Chrysanthus under the Roman emperor Numerian. It has never been a particularly common English given name.
DAUMANTASmLithuanian
From Lithuanian daug "much" and mantus "intelligent". This name was borne by a 13th-century Lithuanian ruler of Pskov who is venerated as a saint in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
DAVIDmEnglish, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DECLANmIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to Ireland.
DEIRBHILEfIrish
Means "daughter of a poet" from Old Irish der "daughter" and file "poet". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint.
DELPHINUSmLate Roman
Masculine form of DELPHINA. Saint Delphinus was a 4th-century bishop of Bordeaux.
DEMETRIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Δημητριος (Demetrios), which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess DEMETER (1). Kings of Macedon and the Seleucid kingdom have had this name. This was also the name of several early saints including a Saint Demetrius who was martyred in the 4th century.
DENISmFrench, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian
From Denys or Denis, the medieval French forms of DIONYSIUS. Saint Denis was a 3rd-century missionary to Gaul and the first bishop of Paris. He was martyred by decapitation, after which legend says he picked up his own severed head and walked for a distance while preaching a sermon. He is credited with converting the Gauls to Christianity and is considered the patron saint of France.... [more]
DEODATUSmLate Roman
Variant of ADEODATUS or DEUSDEDIT. This name was borne by several saints.
DESIDERATUSmLate Roman
Derived from Latin desideratum meaning "desired". This was the name of a 6th-century French saint.
DESIDERIUSmLate Roman
Derived from Latin desiderium "longing, desire". It was the name of several early saints. It was also borne in the 8th century by the last king of the Lombard Kingdom.
DEWI (1)mWelsh
From Dewydd, an old Welsh form of DAVID. Saint Dewi, the patron saint of Wales, was a 6th-century Welsh bishop.
DIEGOmSpanish
Possibly a shortened form of SANTIAGO. In medieval records Diego was Latinized as Didacus, and it has been suggested that it in fact derives from Greek διδαχη (didache) "teaching". Saint Didacus (or Diego) was a 15th-century Franciscan brother based in Alcalá, Spain. Other famous bearers of this name include Mexican muralist Diego Rivera (1886-1957) and Argentine soccer player Diego Maradona (1960-).
DIONYSIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), Biblical
Latin form of DIONYSIOS. Dionysius the Areopagite, who is mentioned in the New Testament, was a judge converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. This was also the name of many other early saints, including a 3rd-century pope.
DOMINICmEnglish
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.
DONATIANUSmLate Roman
Derivative of Donatus (see DONATO). This was the name of a few early saints.
DONATOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the Late Latin name Donatus meaning "given". Several early saints had this name. The name was also borne by two Renaissance masters: the sculptor Donato di Niccolo di Bette Bardi (also known as Donatello), and the architect Donato Bramante.
DOROTHEAfGerman, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, English, Late Greek
Feminine form of the Late Greek name Δωροθεος (Dorotheos), which meant "gift of God" from Greek δωρον (doron) "gift" and θεος (theos) "god". The name Theodore is composed of the same elements in reverse order. Dorothea was the name of two early saints, notably the 4th-century martyr Dorothea of Caesarea. It was also borne by the 14th-century Saint Dorothea of Montau, who was the patron saint of Prussia.
DRUSTANmAncient Celtic
Older form of TRISTAN. This name was borne by a 7th-century Scottish saint.
DUNSTANmEnglish (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements dunn "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury. It was occasionally used in the Middle Ages, though it died out after the 16th century. It was revived by the Tractarian movement in the 19th century.
DYMPHNAfIrish
Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who was martyred by her father. She is the patron saint of the mentally ill.
EBBA (2)fEnglish
From the Old English name Æbbe, meaning unknown, perhaps a contracted form of a longer name. Saint Ebba was a 7th-century daughter of King Æthelfrith of Bernicia and the founder of monasteries in Scotland. Another saint named Ebba was a 9th-century abbess and martyr who mutilated her own face so that she would not be raped by the invading Danes.
EDANAfHistory
Latinized form of ÉTAÍN. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
EDITHfEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
EDMUNDmEnglish, German, Polish
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.... [more]
EDWARDmEnglish, Polish
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.... [more]
EDWINmEnglish, Dutch
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
EFISIOmItalian
From the Latin byname Ephesius, which originally belonged to a person who was from the city of Ephesus in Ionia. This was the name of a saint martyred on Sardinia in the 4th century.
EGBERTmEnglish, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
EINIONmWelsh
Probably from the Latin name Ennianus, a derivative of Ennius (see ENNIO). It is also a modern Welsh word meaning "anvil". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh king who is considered a saint in some Christian traditions.
EITHNEfIrish, Scottish
Means "kernel, grain" in Irish. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint, sister of Saint Fidelma and follower of Saint Patrick.
ELENfWelsh
Welsh form of HELEN. This was the name of a 4th-century Welsh saint. It also appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, belonging to a woman who built the roads in Wales.
ELEUTHERIUSmLate Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ελευθεριος (Eleutherios) which meant "free". This was the name of a 2nd-century pope, as well as several saints.
ÉLIANEfFrench
Probably from Aeliana, the feminine form of the Roman name Aelianus, which was derived from the Roman family name AELIUS. This was the name of an early saint and martyr.
ELIGIUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name derived from Latin eligere "to choose". The 7th-century Saint Eligius is the patron saint of metalworkers.
ELIJAHmEnglish, Hebrew, Biblical
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.... [more]
ELIZABETHfEnglish, Biblical
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.... [more]
ELMOmEnglish, German, Italian
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element helm meaning "helmet, protection". It is also a derivative of ERASMUS, via the old Italian diminutive Ermo. Saint Elmo, also known as Saint Erasmus, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron of sailors. Saint Elmo's fire is said to be a sign of his protection.
ELOISEfEnglish
From the Old French name Héloïse, which is probably from the Germanic name Helewidis, composed of the elements heil "hale, healthy" and wid "wide". It is sometimes associated with the Greek word ‘ηλιος (helios) "sun" or the name Louise, though there is not likely an etymological connection. This name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Eloise, the wife of the French theologian Peter Abelard. She became a nun after her husband was castrated by her uncle.... [more]
ELOUANmBreton, French
Possibly from a Breton word meaning "light". This name was borne by an obscure 6th-century saint who is now venerated mainly in Brittany and Cornwall.
ELPIDIUSmLate Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ελπιδιος (Elpidios), which was derived from ελπις (elpis) "hope". This was the name of a 4th-century saint who spent twenty years in a cave in Cappadocia.
ELUNEDfWelsh
Derived from Welsh eilun "image, idol". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint.
EMIDIOmItalian
From the Late Latin name Emygdius, which was possibly a Latinized form of a Gaulish name (of unknown meaning). Saint Emygdius was a 3rd-century bishop and martyr, the patron saint against earthquakes.
EMMAfEnglish, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
ENGELBERTmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and beraht "bright". Saint Engelbert was a 13th-century archbishop of Cologne murdered by assassins.
ÉNNAmIrish
Possibly means "bird-like" in Irish. This was the name of several Irish kings and heroes. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint who built the monastery of Killeany.
EPIFANIOmSpanish, Italian
From the Latin name Epiphanius, which was from the Greek name Επιφανιος (Epiphanios), itself derived from the Greek word επιφανεια (epiphaneia) meaning "appearance, manifestation". This name was borne by a few early saints. It is associated with the event known in English as the Epiphany (Spanish Epifanía, Italian Epifania, Latin Epiphania), the coming of the three Magi to visit the infant Jesus.
ERASMUSmLate Greek (Latinized)
Derived from Greek ερασμιος (erasmios) meaning "beloved". Saint Erasmus, also known as Saint Elmo, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus was also the name of a Dutch scholar of the Renaissance period.
ERENmTurkish
Means "saint, holy person" in Turkish.
ERIKmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERZSÉBETfHungarian
Hungarian form of ELIZABETH. This is the native name of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. It was also borne by the infamous Erzsébet Báthory, a 16th-century countess and murderer.
EUDESmMedieval French
Old French form of Audo (see OTTO). This was the name of an 8th-century French saint. It was also borne by a 9th-century French king.
EUGENEmEnglish
English form of Eugenius, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευγενιος (Eugenios) which was derived from the Greek word ευγενης (eugenes) meaning "well born". It is composed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and γενης (genes) "born". This was the name of several saints and four popes.... [more]
EUGENIAfItalian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man. The name was occasionally found in England during the Middle Ages, but it was not regularly used until the 19th century.
EULALIAfSpanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from ευ (eu) "good" and λαλεω (laleo) "to talk". This was the name of an early 4th-century saint and martyr from Merida in Spain. She is a patron saint of Barcelona.
EUPHEMIAfAncient Greek, English (Archaic)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () "good" and φημι (phemi) "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
EUSEBIOSmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek ευσεβης (eusebes) meaning "pious", itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and σεβω (sebo) "to worship, to honour". This was the name of several saints.
EUSTACEmEnglish
English form of EUSTACHIUS or EUSTATHIUS, two names of Greek origin which have been conflated in the post-classical period. Saint Eustace, whose is known under both spellings, was a 2nd-century Roman general who became a Christian after seeing a vision of a cross between the antlers of a stag he was hunting. He was burned to death for refusing to worship the Roman gods and is now regarded as the patron saint of hunters. Due to him, this name was common in England during the Middle Ages, though it is presently rare.
EUSTACHIUSmLate Roman
Possibly from the Greek name EUSTACHYS or from the same source. This (or Eustathius) is the Latin name of Saint Eustace.
EUSTATHIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ευσταθιος (Eustathios), derived from the Greek word ευσταθης (eustathes) meaning "well-built, stable". It is ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and ‘ιστημι (histemi) "to stand, to set up". This was the name of a few early saints, including the 2nd-century martyr also known as Eustachius (see Eustace).
EUSTORGIOmItalian
From Eustorgius, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευστοργιος (Eustorgios), which was from the word ευστοργος (eustorgos) meaning "content", a derivative of ευ (eu) "good" and στεργω (stergo) "to love, to be content". Saint Eustorgius was a 6th-century bishop of Milan.
EUTHYMIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευθυμιος (Euthymios) which meant "in good spirits", derived from the word ευθυμος (euthymos), which was composed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and θυμος (thymos) "soul, spirit". This was the name of several early saints.
EUTYCHIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευτυχιος (Eutychios), a variant of Eutychos (see EUTYCHUS). This was the name of several early saints and martyrs.
EVERILDfHistory
Latinized form of EOFORHILD. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
FABIANmGerman, Dutch, Polish, English
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.
FABIOLAfItalian, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Diminutive of FABIA. This was the name of a 4th-century saint from Rome.
FAOLÁNmIrish
Means "little wolf", derived from Gaelic fáel "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint who did missionary work in Scotland.
FAUSTINOmSpanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of the Roman cognomen Faustinus, which was itself derived from the Roman name FAUSTUS. Faustinus was the name of several early saints.
FAUSTUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "auspicious, lucky" in Latin. It was also occasionally used as a praenomen, or given name. This was the name of several early Christian saints.
FECHÍNmIrish
Means "little raven" from Irish fiach "raven" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint of the 7th century who died of the yellow plague.
FELICITASfGerman, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Latin name which meant "good luck, fortune". In Roman mythology the goddess Felicitas was the personification of good luck. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a slave martyred with her master Perpetua in Carthage.
FELICIUSmLate Roman
Masculine form of FELICIA. This was the name of a 4th-century saint, a companion of Saint Castor of Karden.
FELINUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "cat-like". This was the name of a possibly legendary saint who was martyred with Gratian in the 3rd century.
FELIXmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
FERRERmVarious
From a surname which meant "blacksmith" in Catalan. This name is often given in honour of Saint Vicente Ferrer, a 14th-century missionary who is the patron saint of builders.
FERRUCCIOmItalian
Derived from the Late Latin name Ferrutius, a derivative of ferrum meaning "iron, sword". Saint Ferrutius was a 3rd-century martyr with his brother Ferreolus.
FIACHRAmIrish, Irish Mythology
Derived from Gaelic fiach meaning "raven". In Irish legend Fiachra was one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners, a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France.
FIDELMAfIrish
Latinized form of FEIDELM. Saint Fidelma and her sister Saint Eithne were 5th-century followers of Saint Patrick.
FINAfItalian
Short form of SERAFINA. Saint Fina, also known as Saint Serafina, was a 13th-century girl from the town of San Gimignano in Italy.
FINNIANmIrish
Derived from Old Irish finn "white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
FINTANmIrish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white bull" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
FIONNÁNmIrish
Diminutive of FIONN. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
FIONNBHARRmIrish
Means "fair hair", derived from Irish fionn "white, fair" and barr "head". Saint Fionnbharr of Cork was a 6th-century bishop who supposedly performed miraculous cures. The Barry Islands off Wales were named for him.
FIRMINmFrench, Medieval English
From the Late Latin name Firminus which meant "firm". This was the name of several early saints, notably the 3rd-century bishop Saint Firmin (or Fermin) of Amiens who is especially venerated in Navarre, Spain.
FLAVIANmHistory
From the Roman family name Flavianus, which was derived from FLAVIUS. This was the name of several early saints including a 5th-century patriarch of Constantinople who was beaten to death.
FLORENCEf & mEnglish, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.... [more]
FLORIANmGerman, Polish, French
From the Roman name Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, is the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
FLORINUSmLate Roman
Latin name which was a derivative of FLORUS. This was the name of a 9th-century Swiss saint.
FORTUNATOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of the Late Latin name Fortunatus meaning "fortunate, blessed, happy". This was the name of several early saints and martyrs.
FOSTER (2)mEnglish
English form of VAAST, referring to Saint Vedastus.
FRANCESfEnglish
Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century. A notable bearer was Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), a social worker and the first American to be canonized.
FRANCISm & fEnglish, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.... [more]
FRIDESWIDEfHistory
Modern form of the Old English name Friðuswiþ, formed of the elements friþ "peace" and swiþ "strong". Saint Frideswide was an 8th-century English princess who became a nun. She is credited with establishing Christ Church in Oxford.
FULBERTmFrench, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements fulc "people" and beraht "bright". Saint Fulbert was an 11th-century bishop of Chartres.
FULGENCIOmSpanish
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Fulgentius, which meant "shining" from Latin fulgens. Saint Fulgentius was a 6th-century bishop from Tunisia who was a friend of Saint Augustine.
GAETANOmItalian
Italian form of the Latin name Caietanus, which meant "from Caieta". Caieta (now called Gaeta) was a town in ancient Italy, its name deriving either from Kaiadas, the name a Greek location where prisoners were executed, or else from Caieta, the name of the nurse of Aeneas. Saint Gaetano was a 16th-century Italian priest who founded the Theatines.
GAIUSmAncient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman praenomen, or given name, of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from Latin gaudere "to rejoice", though it may be of unknown Etruscan origin. This was a very common Roman praenomen, the most famous bearers being Gaius Julius Caesar, the great leader of the Roman Republic, and his adopted son Gaius Octavius (later known as Augustus), the first Roman emperor. This name also appears in the New Testament belonging to a bishop of Ephesus who is regarded as a saint.
GALLUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which meant "rooster" in Latin. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint, a companion of Saint Columbanus, who later became a hermit in Switzerland.
GAMALIELmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "my reward is God" in Hebrew. In Acts in the New Testament he is a teacher of Saint Paul.
GARBHÁNmIrish
Means "little rough one" from Irish garbh "rough" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint.
GASTONmFrench
Possibly from a Germanic name derived from the element gast meaning "stranger, guest". This is the usual French name for Saint Vedastus, called Vaast in Flemish, and alternatively the name may be connected to it. The name was also borne by several counts of Foix-Béarn, beginning in the 13th century.
GAVINOmItalian
From the Late Latin name Gabinus, which possibly referred to the ancient city of Gabii in central Italy. Saint Gavino was martyred in Sardinia in the 3rd century.
GEBHARDmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element geb "gift" combined with hard "brave, hardy". Saint Gebhard was a 10th-century bishop of Constance.
GEEVARGHESEmIndian, Malayalam
Malayalam form of GEORGE, used by Saint Thomas Christians in the Indian state of Kerala.
GELLÉRTmHungarian
Hungarian form of GERARD. Saint Gellért was an 11th-century missionary to Hungary who was martyred by being thrown into the Danube.
GENEVIÈVEfFrench
From the medieval name Genovefa, which is of uncertain origin. It could be derived from the Germanic elements kuni "kin, family" and wefa "wife, woman". Alternatively it could be of Gaulish origin, from the related Celtic element genos "kin, family" combined with a second element of unknown meaning. This name was borne by Saint Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris, who inspired the city to resist the Huns in the 5th century.
GENNADIUSmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Γενναδιος (Gennadios), which was derived from Greek γενναδας (gennadas) "noble, generous". Saint Gennadius was an early martyr from North Africa.
GEORGEmEnglish, Romanian
From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.... [more]
GERASIMOSmGreek
Derived from Greek γερας (geras) meaning either "old" or "honour". Saint Gerasimus was a 5th-century hermit.
GEREONmGerman, Late Roman
Possibly derived from Greek γερων (geron) meaning "old man, elder". This was the name of a saint martyred in Cologne in the 4th century.
GERLACHmDutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with laic "play". Saint Gerlach was a 12th-century Dutch soldier who became a hermit.
GERMAINEfFrench
French feminine form of GERMAIN. Saint Germaine was a 16th-century peasant girl from France.
GERMANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "brother" in Latin. This was the name of several early saints.
GERTRUDEfEnglish, Dutch
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).
GERVASIUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name with a first element deriving from ger "spear". Saint Gervasius was an early martyr from Milan whose remains were discovered in the 4th century.
GHISLAINmFrench
French form of Gislenus, a Latinized form of the Germanic name Gislin, derived from the element gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This was the name of a 7th-century Belgian saint.
GIAMBATTISTAmItalian
Combination of GIANNI and BATTISTA, given in honour of Saint John the Baptist.
GILBERTmEnglish, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILESmEnglish
From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek αιγιδιον (aigidion) meaning "young goat". Saint Giles was an 8th-century miracle worker who came to southern France from Greece. He is regarded as the patron saint of the crippled. In Old French the name Aegidius became Gidie and then Gilles, at which point it was imported to England.