Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is French.
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ABEL   m   English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) or הָבֶל (Havel) which meant "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
ABRAHAM   m   English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
ABSOLON   m   French
French form of ABSALOM.
ACHILLE   m   French, Italian
French and Italian form of ACHILLES.
ADAM   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADÉLARD   m   French (Quebec)
French form of ADALHARD.
ADOLPHE   m   French
French form of ADOLF.
ADRIEN   m   French
French form of ADRIAN.
AIMÉ   m   French
From Old French Amé, the masculine form of Amée (see AMY).
ALAIN   m   French
French form of ALAN.
ALAN   m   English, Scottish, Breton, French
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It was used in Brittany at least as early as the 6th century, and it possibly means either "little rock" or "handsome" in Breton. Alternatively, it may derive from the tribal name of the Alans, an Iranian people who migrated into Europe in the 4th and 5th centuries.... [more]
ALBAN   m   German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Albanus which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALBERT   m   English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALDÉRIC   m   French
Variant of ALDRIC.
ALDRIC   m   French, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and ric "ruler, power". Saint Aldric was a 9th-century bishop of Le Mans.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDRE   m   French, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Form of ALEXANDER. This name was borne by the 19th-century French author Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870), who wrote 'The Three Musketeers'.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALPHONSE   m   French
French form of ALFONSO.
AMABLE   m   French (Archaic)
French form of AMABILIS.
AMAURY   m   French
French form of AMALRIC.
AMBROISE   m   French
French form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
AMÉDÉE   m   French
French form of AMADEUS.
AMOUR   m & f   French
French form of AMOR.
ANATOLE   m   French
French form of ANATOLIUS.
ANDRÉ   m   French, Portuguese
French and Portuguese form of Andreas (see ANDREW).
ANSELME   m   French
French form of ANSELM.
ANTHELME   m   French
French form of ANTHELM.
ANTOINE   m   French, African American
French form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIN   m   French
French form of Antoninus (see ANTONINO). This name was borne by the French playwright Antonin Artaud (1896-1948).
APOLLINAIRE   m   French (Rare)
French form of APOLLINARIS. It was adopted as a surname by the Polish-French poet Guillaume Apollinaire (1880-1918), who based it on his Polish middle name Apolinary.
ARIEL   m & f   Hebrew, English, French, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).
ARISTIDE   m   French, Italian
French and Italian form of ARISTIDES.
ARMAND   m   French
French form of HERMAN.
ARMEL   m   French
From the old Welsh name Arthfael, which was composed of the elements arth "bear" and mael "prince". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded abbeys in Brittany.
ARNAUD   m   French
French form of ARNOLD.
ARSÈNE   m   French
French form of ARSENIOS.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
AUBERT   m   French
French variant of ALBERT.
AUBIN   m   French
French form of ALBINUS.
AUGUSTE (1)   m   French
French form of AUGUSTUS.
AUGUSTIN   m   French, Czech, Romanian, Croatian, German
Form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AURÈLE   m   French
French form of AURELIUS.
AURÉLIEN   m   French
French form of AURELIANUS.
BABYLAS   m   Late Greek, French (Rare)
Derived from the name of the ancient Mesopotamian city of Babylon. Saint Babylas was a 3rd-century patriarch of Antioch who was martyred during the reign of emperor Decius.
BAPTISTE   m   French
Means "baptist" in French, originally deriving from Greek βαπτω (bapto) "to dip". This name is usually given in honour of Saint John the Baptist, and as such it is often paired with the name Jean.
BARNABÉ   m   French
French form of BARNABAS.
BARTHÉLÉMY   m   French
French form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BASILE   m   French
French form of BASIL (1).
BASTIEN   m   French
Short form of SÉBASTIEN.
BAUDOUIN   m   French
French form of BALDWIN.
BENJAMIN   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
BENOIT   m   French
French form of BENEDICT.
BÉRENGER   m   French
French form of BERENGAR.
BERNARD   m   English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERTRAND   m   French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with BERTRAM and the two names have merged to some degree. A famous bearer was English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
BLAISE   m   French
From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).
BONIFACE   m   French, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Bonifatius, which meant "good fate" from bonum "good" and fatum "fate". This was the name of nine popes and also several saints, including an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary to Germany (originally named Winfrid) who is now regarded as the patron saint of that country. It came into use in England during the Middle Ages, but became rare after the Protestant Reformation.
BRICE   m   French, English
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
BRUNO   m   German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
CALIXTE   m   French
French form of CALIXTUS.
CAMILLE   f & m   French, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CANDIDE   m & f   French
French form of CANDIDUS or CANDIDA.
CASIMIR   m   English, French
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.
CÉLESTE   f & m   French
French feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS.
CÉLESTIN   m   French
French form of CAELESTINUS.
CÉSAIRE   m   French
French form of CAESARIUS.
CÉSAR   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of CAESAR. A famous bearer was the American labour organizer César Chávez (1927-1993).
CHARLES   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CHARLOT   m   French
French diminutive of CHARLES.
CHRISTIAN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.
CHRISTOPHE   m   French
French form of CHRISTOPHER.
CLAIR   m   French, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
CLAUDE   m & f   French, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLÉMENT   m   French
French form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLOVIS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized), French
Shortened form of Clodovicus, a Latinized form of Chlodovech (see LUDWIG). Clovis was a Frankish king who united France under his rule in the 5th century.
CÔME   m   French
French form of COSMAS.
CONSTANT   m   French, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name CONSTANS. It was also used by the Puritans as a vocabulary name, from the English word constant.
CONSTANTIN   m   Romanian, French
Romanian and French form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
CORENTIN   m   Breton, French
Possibly means "hurricane" in Breton. This was the name of a 5th-century bishop of Quimper in Brittany.
CORIN   m   French
French form of QUIRINUS.
CORNEILLE   m   French (Archaic)
French form of CORNELIUS.
COSME   m   Portuguese, French
Portuguese and French form of COSMAS.
CYRIL   m   English, French, Czech, Slovak
From the Greek name Κυριλλος (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.... [more]
CYRILLE   m & f   French
French form of CYRIL, sometimes used as a feminine form.
DAMIEN   m   French
French form of DAMIAN.
DANIEL   m   English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DENIEL   m   Breton
Breton form of DANIEL.
DENIS   m   French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian
From Denys or Denis, the medieval French forms of DIONYSIUS. Saint Denis was a 3rd-century missionary to Gaul and the first bishop of Paris. He was martyred by decapitation, after which legend says he picked up his own severed head and walked for a distance while preaching a sermon. He is credited with converting the Gauls to Christianity and is considered the patron saint of France.... [more]
DÉODAT   m   French
French form of DEODATUS.
DÉSIRÉ   m   French
Masculine form of DÉSIRÉE.
DIDIER   m   French
French form of DESIDERIO.
DIEUDONNÉ   m   French
Means "given by God" in French, used as a French form of DEUSDEDIT.
DIMITRI   m   Russian, French
Variant of DMITRIY, using the Church Slavic spelling.
DIODORE   m   French
French form of DIODORUS.
DOMINIQUE   f & m   French
French feminine and masculine form of DOMINIC.
DONAT   m   French, Occitan, Catalan, Polish
French, Occitan, Catalan and Polish form of DONATO.
DONATIEN   m   French
French form of DONATIANUS.
DORIAN   m   English, French
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians, or from the surname DORAN.
EDGAR   m   English, French
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Bride of Lammermoor' (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
EDGARD   m   French
French form of EDGAR.
EDMÉ   m   French (Archaic)
Short form of EDMOND.
EDMOND   m   French
French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
ÉDOUARD   m   French
French form of EDWARD.
ÉLIE   m   French
French form of ELIJAH.
ELOI   m   French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of ELIGIUS.
ELOUAN   m   Breton, French
Possibly from a Breton word meaning "light". This name was borne by an obscure 6th-century saint who is now venerated mainly in Brittany and Cornwall.
ÉMERIC   m   French
French form of EMMERICH.
ÉMILE   m   French
French form of Aemilius (see EMIL). This name was borne by French author Emile Zola (1840-1902).
ÉMILIEN   m   French
French form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
EMMANUEL   m   Biblical, French, English
From the Hebrew name עִמָּנוּאֵל ('Immanu'el) meaning "God is with us". This was the foretold name of the Messiah in the Old Testament. It has been used in England since the 16th century in the spellings Emmanuel and Immanuel, though it has not been widespread. The name has been more common in continental Europe, especially in Spain and Portugal (in the spellings Manuel and Manoel).
ENZO   m   Italian, French
The meaning of this name is uncertain. In some cases it seems to be an old Italian form of HEINZ, though in other cases it could be a variant of the Germanic name ANZO. In modern times it is also used as a short form of names ending in enzo, such as VINCENZO or LORENZO.
ÉRIC   m   French
French form of ERIC.
ERMENEGILDE   m   French
French form of HERMENEGILDO.
ERNEST   m   English, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (1895).
ERWAN   m   Breton
Breton form of IVO (1) or YVES.
ERWANN   m   Breton
Variant of ERWAN.
ETHAN   m   English, Jewish, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.... [more]
ÉTIENNE   m   French
French form of STEPHEN.
EUGÈNE   m   French
French form of Eugenius (see EUGENE).
EUSTACHE   m   French
French form of Eustachius or Eustathius (see EUSTACE).
ÉVARISTE   m   French
French form of EVARISTUS.
ÉVRARD   m   French
French form of EVERARD.
FABIEN   m   French
French form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FABRICE   m   French
French form of the Roman family name Fabricius, which was derived from Latin faber "craftsman". Gaius Fabricius Luscinus was a 3rd-century BC Roman general and statesman.
FÉLICIEN   m   French
French form of Felicianus (see FELICIANO).
FÉLIX   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of FELIX.
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FERNAND   m   French
French form of FERDINAND.
FIACRE   m   French
French form of FIACHRA.
FIRMIN   m   French
From the Late Latin name Firminus which meant "firm". This was the name of several early saints, notably the 3rd-century bishop Saint Firmin (or Fermin) of Amiens who is especially venerated in Navarre, Spain.
FLAVIEN   m   French
French form of FLAVIAN.
FLORENCE   f & m   English, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.... [more]
FLORENT   m   French
French masculine form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FLORENTIN   m   French
French form of FLORENTINUS.
FLORIAN   m   German, Polish, French
From the Roman name Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, is the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
FRANCIS   m & f   English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.... [more]
FRANCISQUE   m   French
French variant of Franciscus (see FRANCIS), now somewhat archaic.
FRANCK   m   French
French form of FRANK (1).
FRANÇOIS   m   French
French form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). François Villon was a French lyric poet of the 15th century. This was also the name of two kings of France.
FRANK (1)   m   English, German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis.... [more]
FRAÑSEZ   m   Breton
Breton form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FRÉDÉRIC   m   French
French form of FREDERICK.
FULBERT   m   French, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements fulc "people" and beraht "bright". Saint Fulbert was an 11th-century bishop of Chartres.
GABIN   m   French
French form of Gabinus (see GAVINO).
GABRIEL   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.... [more]
GAËL   m   French, Breton
Meaning uncertain. It possibly derives from the ethno-linguistic term Gael, which refers to speakers of Gaelic languages. Alternatively it may be a variant of GWENAËL.
GAÉTAN   m   French
French form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
GAËTAN   m   French
French form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
GASPARD   m   French
French form of JASPER.
GASTON   m   French
Possibly from a Germanic name derived from the element gast meaning "stranger, guest". This is the usual French name for Saint Vedastus, called Vaast in Flemish, and alternatively the name may be connected to it. The name was also borne by several counts of Foix-Béarn, beginning in the 13th century.
GAUBERT   m   French
French form of the Germanic name Waldobert, composed of the elements wald "rule" and beraht "bright". This was the name of a 7th-century French saint.
GAULTIER   m   French
French form of WALTER.
GAUTHIER   m   French
French form of WALTER.
GAUTIER   m   French
French form of WALTER.
GEOFFREY   m   English, French
From a Norman French form of a Germanic name. The second element is Germanic frid "peace", but the first element may be either gawia "territory", walha "foreign" or gisil "hostage". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. In the later Middle Ages Geoffrey was further confused with the distinct name Godfrey.... [more]
GEOFFROY   m   French
French form of GEOFFREY.
GEORGES   m   French
French form of GEORGE. This name was borne by the French artists Georges Seurat (1859-1891) and Georges Braque (1882-1963).
GÉRALD   m   French
French form of GERALD.
GÉRARD   m   French
French form of GERARD.
GÉRAUD   m   French
French form of GERALD.
GERMAIN   m   French
French form of GERMANUS.
GERVAIS   m   French
French form of GERVASIUS.
GHISLAIN   m   French
French form of Gislenus, a Latinized form of the Germanic name Gislin, derived from the element gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This was the name of a 7th-century Belgian saint.
GHYSLAIN   m   French (Rare)
Variant of GHISLAIN.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILLES   m   French
French form of GILES.
GODEFROY   m   French
French form of Godafrid (see GODFREY).
GRATIEN   m   French
French form of Gratianus (see GRATIAN).
GRÉGOIRE   m   French
French form of GREGORY.
GUILLAUME   m   French
French form of WILLIAM.
GUSTAVE   m   French
French form of GUSTAV. This name was borne by the French artist Gustave Doré (1832-1883).
GUY   m   English, French
Norman French form of WIDO. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels 'Guy Mannering' (1815) by Sir Walter Scott and 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
GWENAËL   m   French, Breton
Means "blessed and generous" from Breton gwenn "white, fair, blessed" and hael "generous". Saint Gwenhael was a 6th-century abbot of Brittany.
GWENNEG   m   Breton
Derived from Breton gwenn "white, fair, blessed" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Gwenneg was an 8th-century monk of Brittany.
GWILHERM   m   Breton
Breton form of WILLIAM.
HADRIEN   m   French
French variant form of ADRIAN.
HECTOR   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.... [more]
HENRI   m   French, Finnish
French form of HENRY.
HERBERT   m   English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HERCULE   m   French
French form of HERCULES.
HERVÉ   m   French
French form of HARVEY.
HILAIRE   m   French
French form of HILARIUS.
HIPPOLYTE (2)   m   French
French form of HIPPOLYTOS.
HONORÉ   m   French
French form of HONORATUS. It is also sometimes used as a French form of HONORIUS.
HORACE   m   English, French
English and French form of HORATIUS, and the name by which the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus is commonly known those languages. In the modern era it has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, in honour of the poet.
HUBERT   m   English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century.
HUGUES   m   French
French form of HUGH.
HUMBERT   m   German, French, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
HYACINTHE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
IGNACE   m   French
French form of IGNATIUS.
IRÉNÉE   m   French
French form of IRENAEUS.
ISIDORE   m   English, French, Georgian, Jewish
From the Greek name Ισιδωρος (Isidoros) which meant "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess ISIS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian.... [more]
JACKY   m   French
Diminutive of JACQUES.
JACQUES   m   French
French form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JASMIN (2)   m   French (Rare)
French masculine form of JASMINE.
JASON   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical
From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father Aeson as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.... [more]
JEAN (1)   m   French
French form of Jehan, the Old French form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The French philosophers Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) and Jean Paul Sartre (1905-1980) were two well-known bearers of this name. It was also borne by the German-French Dadaist artist Jean Arp (1886-1966).
JEAN-BAPTISTE   m   French
Combination of JEAN (1) and BAPTISTE, referring to Saint John the Baptist.
JEAN-MARIE   m   French
Combination of JEAN (1) and MARIE.
JEANNOT   m   French
Diminutive of JEAN (1).
JÉRÉMIE   m   French
French form of JEREMIAH.
JÉRÔME   m   French
French form of JEROME.
JOACHIM   m   French, German, Polish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Contracted form of JEHOIACHIN or JEHOIAKIM. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
JOCELYN   f & m   English, French
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element Gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Gauts, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.
JODOC   m   Breton
Variant of JUDOC.
JOËL   m   French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of JOEL.
JOFFREY   m   French
French variant form of GEOFFREY.
JONATHAN   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan),contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
JOSEPH   m   English, French, German, Biblical
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.... [more]
JOSSE   m   French (Rare), Medieval French
French form of Iudocus (see JOYCE).
JOSSELIN   m   French
French variant of JOCELYN.
JOSUÉ   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of JOSHUA.
JOURDAIN   m   French
French form of JORDAN.
JUDICAËL   m   French, Breton
French form of the Old Breton name Iudicael, derived from the elements iud "lord, prince" and cael "generous". This was the name of a 7th-century Breton king, also regarded as a saint.
JUDIKAEL   m   Breton
Breton form of JUDICAËL.
JUDOC   m   Breton, Ancient Celtic
Breton form of JOYCE.
JULES (1)   m   French
French form of JULIUS. A notable bearer of this name was the French novelist Jules Verne (1828-1905), author of 'Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea' and other works of science fiction.
JULIEN   m   French
French form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).
JUSTE   m   French
French form of JUSTUS.
JUSTIN   m   English, French, Slovene
From the Latin name Iustinus, which was derived from JUSTUS. This was the name of several early saints including Justin Martyr, a Christian philosopher of the 2nd century who was beheaded in Rome. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors. As an English name, it has occasionally been used since the late Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 20th century. Famous modern bearers include pop stars Justin Timberlake (1981-) and Justin Bieber (1994-).
KEVIN   m   English, Irish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the 20th century.
KILIAN   m   German, Irish, French
German form and Irish and French variant of CILLIAN.
KILLIAN   m   Irish, French
Anglicized variant of CILLIAN, also used in France.
KYLIAN   m   French
French variant of CILLIAN.
LAMBERT   m   German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements land "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
LAURENT   m   French
French form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURENTIN   m   French
French form of LAURENTINUS.
LAZARE   m   French
French form of LAZARUS.
LÉANDRE   m   French
French form of LEANDER.
LÉO   m   French
French form of LEO.
LÉON   m   French
French form of LEON.
LÉONARD   m   French
French form of LEONARD.
LÉONCE   m   French
French form of LEONTIOS.
LÉONIDE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of LEONIDAS.
LÉOPOLD   m   French
French form of LEOPOLD.
LILIAN   f & m   English, French
English variant of LILLIAN, as well as a French masculine form.
LIONEL   m   French, English
French diminutive of LÉON. A notable bearer is Argentine soccer star Lionel Messi (1987-).
LOAN   m   French
Variant of ELOUAN.
LOANN   m   French
Variant of ELOUAN.
LOÏC   m   French, Breton
Breton form of LOUIS.
LOTHAIRE   m   French
French form of LOTHAR.
LOU   f & m   English, French
Short form of LOUISE or LOUIS. Famous bearers include the baseball player Lou Gehrig (1903-1941) and the musician Lou Reed (1942-2013).
LOUIS   m   French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LOUP   m   French
French form of the Late Latin name Lupus which meant "wolf". Lupus was the name of several early saints, including a 5th-century bishop of Troyes who apparently convinced Attila to spare the city.
LUC   m   French
French form of LUKE.
LUCAS   m   English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).
LUCIEN   m   French
French form of LUCIANUS.
LUCRÈCE   f & m   French
French form of both LUCRETIA and its masculine form Lucretius.
LUDOVIC   m   French
Medieval Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of an 1833 opera by the French composer Fromental Halévy.
MAËL   m   French, Breton
French form of Breton Mael, which was derived from a Celtic word meaning "chief" or "prince". Saint Mael was a 5th-century Breton hermit who lived in Wales.
MAEL   m   Breton
Breton form of MAËL.
MANU (2)   m & f   French, Spanish, German, Finnish
Short form of MANUEL or EMMANUEL (or MANUELA in Germany).
MANUEL   m   Spanish, Portuguese, German, English, Italian, French, Romanian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Spanish and Portuguese form of EMMANUEL. In the spelling Μανουηλ (Manouel) it was also used in the Byzantine Empire, notably by two emperors. It is possible this form of the name was transmitted to Spain and Portugal from Byzantium, since there were connections between the royal families (king Ferdinand III of Castile married Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, who had Byzantine roots, and had a son named Manuel). The name has been used in Iberia since at least the 13th century and was borne by two kings of Portugal.
MARC   m   French, Catalan, Welsh
French, Catalan and Welsh form of MARK.
MARCELLIN   m   French
French form of MARCELLINUS.
MARIN   m   French, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
French, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of MARINUS.
MARIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French
Roman family name which was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MATÉO   m   French
French form of MATEO or MATTEO.
MATHÉO   m   French
French form of MATEO or MATTEO.
MATHIEU   m   French
French form of MATTHEW.
MATHIS   m   German, French
German and French form of MATTHIAS.
MATHYS   m   French
French variant of MATTHIAS.
MATTHIAS   m   Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
MATTHIEU   m   French
Variant of MATHIEU.
MAURICE   m   English, French
From the Roman name Mauritius, a derivative of MAURUS. Saint Maurice was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Egypt. He and the other Christians in his legion were supposedly massacred on the orders of emperor Maximian for refusing to worship Roman gods. Thus, he is the patron saint of infantry soldiers.... [more]
MAXENCE   m   French
French form of the Roman name Maxentius, a derivative of Latin maximus "greatest". This was the agnomen of an early 4th-century Roman emperor, a rival of Constantine. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint from Agde in France.
MAXIME   m   French
French form of MAXIMUS.
MAXIMILIEN   m   French
French form of Maximilianus (see MAXIMILIAN).
MICHAËL   m   Dutch, French
Dutch and French form of MICHAEL.
MICHEL   m   French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MICKAËL   m   French
French variant form of MICHAEL.
MODESTE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of MODESTUS.
MOÏSE   m   French
French form of MOSES.
MORGAN (1)   m & f   Welsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
NAPOLÉON   m   French (Rare)
French form of NAPOLEON.
NARCISSE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NATHAN   m   English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.... [more]
NATHANAËL   m   French
French form of NATHANAEL.
NAZAIRE   m   French
French form of Nazarius (see NAZARIO).
NICÉPHORE   m   French
French form of NIKEPHOROS.
NICHOLAS   m   English, French
From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.... [more]
NICODÈME   m   French
French form of NICODEMUS.
NICOLAS   m   French
French form of NICHOLAS.
NOÉ   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of NOAH (1).
NOËL   m   French
Means "Christmas" in French. In the Middle Ages it was used for children born on the holiday. A famous bearer was the English playwright and composer Noël Coward (1899-1973).
NORBERT   m   German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord "north" and beraht "bright". This was the name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
OCTAVE   m   French
French form of OCTAVIUS.
ODILON   m   French, Portuguese
French masculine form of ODILIA.
OLIVIER   m   French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
ONÉSIME   m   French
French form of ONESIMUS.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
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