German Names

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
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GERT   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch short form of GERHARD.
GERTRAUD   f   German
German form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERTRUDE.
GERULF   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic ger "spear" and wulf "wolf".
GERVAS   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERVASIUS.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GISA   f   German
German short form of GISELLE.
GISBERT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name in which the second element is beraht "bright". The first element is probably a shortened form of gisil "pledge, hostage" (making it a variant of GILBERT), though it could be related to Gallo-Celtic gaiso "spear".
GISELA   f   German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
German, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese form of GISELLE.
GITTA   f   German, Hungarian
German short form of BRIGITTA and a Hungarian short form of MARGIT.
GLORIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German
Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898). It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).
GOTTFRIED   m   German
German form of GODFREY. This name was borne by the 13th-century German poet Gottfried von Strassburg and the German philosopher and mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), one of the inventors of calculus.
GOTTHARD   m   German
German form of GODEHARD.
GOTTHILF   m   German (Rare)
Derived from German Gott "God" and hilf "help". This name was created in the 17th century.
GOTTHOLD   m   German (Rare)
Derived from German Gott "God" and hold "lovely". This name was created in the 17th century.
GOTTLIEB   m   German (Rare)
German form of GOTELEIB.
GOTTLOB   m   German (Rare)
Derived from German Gott "God" and lob "praise". This name was created in the 17th century.
GOTTSCHALK   m   German (Archaic)
Derived from the Germanic elements god "god" and scalc "servant". Saint Gottschalk was a (perhaps spurious) 11th-century prince of the Wends who was martyred by his brother-in-law.
GRATIA   f   German
Means "grace" in Latin.
GREGOR   m   German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of GREGORY. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
GRETA   f   German, Swedish, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GRETCHEN   f   German, English
German diminutive of MARGARETA.
GRETE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of MARGARET.
GRETEL   f   German
Diminutive of GRETE. This name is well-known as the character in Grimm's fairy tale who is captured, with her brother Hansel, by a witch.
GUDRUN   f   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
GUIDO   m   Italian, German
Latinized form of WIDO. This was the name of two 11th-century saints. Other notable bearers include 11th-century music theorist Guido d'Arezzo, 13th-century poet Guido Cavalcanti, and 17th-century painter Guido Reni.
GUNDA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund which means "war".
GUNDULA   f   German
Elaborated form of GUNDA.
GÜNTER   m   German
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GUNTER   m   German
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GÜNTHER   m   German, Germanic Mythology
From the Germanic name Gundahar, derived from the elements gund "war" and hari "army, warrior". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century Burgundian king. He appears in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', which has him wooing the Icelandic queen Brünhild. He wins her hand in marriage with the help of the hero Siegfried. He ultimately betrays Siegfried, but Siegfried's widow Kriemhild (Günther's sister) takes her revenge upon him.
GUNTHER   m   German
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GUNTRAM   m   German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
GUSTAF   m   Swedish, German
Swedish and German variant of GUSTAV.
GUSTAV   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Possibly means "staff of the Goths", derived from the Old Norse elements Gautr "Goth" and stafr "staff". However, the root name Gautstafr is not well attested in the Old Norse period. Alternatively, it might be derived from the Slavic name GOSTISLAV. This name has been borne by six kings of Sweden, including the 16th-century Gustav I Vasa.
HAGEN (1)   m   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic element hagan meaning "enclosure". In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' he is the half-brother of Günther. He killed the hero Siegfried by luring him onto a hunting expedition and then stabbing him with a javelin in his one vulnerable spot.
HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Arabic, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
HANNE (1)   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of JOHANNE, or a German and Dutch short form of JOHANNA. This can also be a Dutch short form of JOHANNES (masculine).
HANNELORE   f   German
Combination of HANNE (1) and ELEONORE.
HANNES   m   German, Swedish, Dutch, Finnish
Short form of JOHANNES.
HANS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian short form of JOHANNES. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a Renaissance portrait painter from Germany, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
HARALD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Scandinavian and German cognate of HAROLD. This was the name of several kings of Norway and Denmark.
HARTMANN   m   German
Means "brave man", derived from the Germanic element hard "brave, hardy" combined with man.
HARTMUT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave mind", derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and muot "mind, spirit".
HARTWIG   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and wig "battle".
HARTWIN   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "brave friend" from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and win "friend".
HEDWIG   f   German
From the Germanic name Hadewig, derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and wig "war". This was the name of a 13th-century German saint, the wife of the Polish duke Henry the Bearded. It was subsequently borne by a 14th-century Polish queen (usually known by her Polish name Jadwiga) who is now also regarded as a saint.
HEDY   f   German, Dutch
Diminutive of HEDWIG and other Germanic names beginning with the element hadu meaning "battle, combat".
HEIDA   f   German
German diminutive of ADELHEID.
HEIDI   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English
German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel 'Heidi' (1880) by Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.
HEIDRUN   f   Norse Mythology, German
Derived from Old Norse heiðr meaning "bright, clear" and rún meaning "secret". In Norse mythology this was the name of a goat that would eat the leaves from the tree of life and produce mead in her udder.
HEIKE   f & m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HENRIKE or HEINRICH.
HEIKO   m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEILWIG   f   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements heil "happy, hearty, healthy" and wig "war".
HEINER   m   German
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEINO   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German form of Haimo (see HAMO).
HEINRICH   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of HENRY. This was the name of several German kings.
HEINRIKE   f   German (Rare)
Feminine form of HEINRICH.
HEINZ   m   German
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
HELENE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HELFRIED   m   German
Variant of HELMFRIED.
HELGE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Helgi, derived from heilagr meaning "holy, blessed".
HELLA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Variant of HELGA.
HELMA   f   German, Dutch
Short form of WILHELMINA.
HELMFRIED   m   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements helm "helmet" and frid "peace".
HELMINE   f   German
Short form of WILHELMINE.
HELMUT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element helm "helmet" or heil "healthy" combined with muot "spirit, mind".
HELMUTH   m   German
Variant of HELMUT.
HENDRIK   m   Dutch, German, Estonian
Dutch and Estonian cognate of HENRY.
HENNING   m   German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Diminutive of HENRIK.
HENRIETTE   f   French, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
French feminine diminutive of HENRY.
HENRIKE   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian feminine form of HENRY.
HERBERT   m   English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HERIBERT   m   German
German form of HERBERT.
HERMANN   m   German
German form of HERMAN.
HERMENEGILD   m   German (Rare)
German form of HERMENEGILDO.
HERMINE   f   German, French
Feminine form of HERMAN.
HERTA   f   German
Variant of HERTHA.
HERTHA   f   German
Form of NERTHUS. The spelling change from N to H resulted from a misreading of Tacitus's text.
HIERONYMUS   m   German, Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of JEROME used in Germany and the Netherlands. Hieronymus Bosch was a 15th-century Dutch painter known for his depictions of the torments of hell.
HILBERT   m   German (Rare)
Variant of HILDEBERT.
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDE   f   German, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian variant of HILDA.
HILDEBERT   m   German (Rare)
Means "bright battle" from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and beraht "bright".
HILDEBRAND   m   German (Archaic), Ancient Germanic
Means "battle sword", derived from the Germanic element hild "battle" combined with brand "sword". This was the name of the hero of an 8th-century poem written in Old High German.
HILDEGARD   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HILTRAUD   f   German
Variant of HILTRUD.
HILTRUD   f   German
Means "strength in battle", derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and thrud "strength".
HILTRUDE   f   German (Archaic)
Variant of HILTRUD.
HINNERK   m   Low German
Low German form of HEINRICH.
HINRICH   m   Low German
Low German form of HEINRICH.
HORST   m   German
Means "wood, thicket" in German. Alternatively, it may derive from the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse".
HUBERT   m   English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century.
HUGO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HULDA (1)   f   Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "sweet, lovable".
HUMBERT   m   German, French, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
IDA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'The Princess' (1847), which was later adapted into the play 'Princess Ida' (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
IGNATZ   m   German (Rare)
German form of IGNATIUS.
IGNAZ   m   German (Rare)
German form of IGNATIUS.
ILONA   f   Hungarian, German, Finnish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Hungarian form of HELEN.
ILSA   f   German
Variant of ILSE.
ILSE   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH.
IMKE   f   Frisian, Dutch, German
Diminutive of IME (2).
IMMANUEL   m   German, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Form of EMMANUEL used in most translations of the Old Testament. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher who held that duty was of highest importance.
INA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Limburgish, Croatian
Short form of names ending with ina.
INGE   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
INGEBORG   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingibjörg, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
INGEBURG   f   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
German variant of INGEBORG.
INGO   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German masculine form of INGE.
INGOLF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingólfr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with úlfr meaning "wolf".
INGRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
INKA   f   Frisian, Finnish, German
Frisian and Finnish feminine form of INGE, and a German variant.
IRENE   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
IRIS   f   Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Greek
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
IRMA   f   German, English, Dutch, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Lithuanian, Hungarian (Rare), Ancient Germanic
German short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ermen, which meant "whole, universal". It is thus related to EMMA. It began to be regularly used in the English-speaking world in the 19th century.
IRMENTRUD   f   German (Archaic)
German form of ERMENDRUD.
IRMGARD   f   German
Contracted form of IRMINGARD.
IRMHILD   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and hild "battle".
IRMINGARD   f   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen meaning "whole, universal" and gard meaning "enclosure".
IRMTRAUD   f   German
Contracted form of IRMENTRUD.
IRMTRUD   f   German (Rare)
Variant of IRMTRAUD.
ISA (2)   f   German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish
Short form of ISABELLA.
ISAAK   m   Russian, German, Biblical Greek
Russian and German form of ISAAC, as well as the form used in the Greek Old Testament.
ISABEL   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.... [more]
ISABELL   f   German
German variant of ISABEL.
ISABELLA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).
ISABELLE   f   French, English, German, Dutch
French form of ISABEL.
ISIDOR   m   German, Russian, Macedonian
German, Russian and Macedonian form of ISIDORE.
ISOLDE   f   English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".... [more]
IVO (1)   m   German, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element iv meaning "yew". Alternative theories suggest that it may in fact be derived from a cognate Celtic element. This was the name of several saints (who are also commonly known as Saint Yves or Ives).
IVONNE   f   Spanish, German, Dutch
Spanish, German and Dutch variant of YVONNE.
JAN (1)   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan
Form of JOHANNES. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer.
JANA (1)   f   Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German, Slovene, Catalan
Feminine form of JAN (1).
JANINA   f   Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Lithuanian
Latinate form of JEANNINE.
JANINE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
Variant of JEANNINE. It has only been in use since the 20th century.
JASMIN (1)   f   German, Finnish, English
German and Finnish form of JASMINE, as well as an English variant.
JENNIFER   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma' (1906).
JENNY   f   English, Swedish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Originally a medieval English diminutive of JANE. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of JENNIFER.
JEREMIAS   m   German, Portuguese, Finnish
German, Portuguese and Finnish form of JEREMIAH.
JESSICA   f   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JESSIKA   f   German, English (Modern)
German and English variant of JESSICA.
JO   f & m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of JOAN (1), JOANNA, JOSEPHINE, or other names that begin with Jo. It is primarily masculine in German and Dutch, short for JOHANNES or JOSEF.
JOACHIM   m   French, German, Polish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Contracted form of JEHOIACHIN or JEHOIAKIM. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
JOCHEN   m   German
German form of JOACHIM.
JOCHIM   m   German (Rare)
German variant form of JOACHIM.
JOCKEL   m   German
Diminutive of JAKOB, JÖRG or JOACHIM.
JOHANN   m   German
German form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Famous bearers include German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), German novelist and poet Johann Goethe (1749-1832), and Austrian composers Johann Strauss the Elder (1804-1849) and his son Johann Strauss the Younger (1825-1899).
JOHANNA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Hungarian, Finnish, Estonian, English, Late Roman
Latinate form of Ioanna (see JOANNA).
JOHANNES   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Latin form of Ioannes (see JOHN). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
JONAS (2)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical
From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.
JONATAN   m   Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Spanish form of JONATHAN, as well as a Scandinavian and German variant form.
JONATHAN   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan),contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
JÖRDIS   f   German
German form of HJÖRDÍS.
JÖRG   m   German
German short form of GEORGE.
JOSEF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech
German, Scandinavian and Czech form of JOSEPH.
JOSEFINE   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German
Scandinavian and German form of JOSÉPHINE.
JOSEPH   m   English, French, German, Biblical
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.... [more]
JOSEPHA   f   German (Archaic), English (Rare)
Feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOSEPHINE   f   English, German, Dutch
English, German and Dutch form of JOSÉPHINE.
JOST   m   German
German form of Iudocus (see JOYCE).
JUDITH   f   English, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "woman from Judea", Judea being an ancient region in Israel. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.... [more]
JULIA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).... [more]
JULIAN   m   English, Polish, German
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
JULIANA   f   Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JULIANE   f   German, French
German and French feminine form of JULIAN.
JULIE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JULIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, German
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.... [more]
JÜRGEN   m   Low German
Low German form of GEORGE.
JUSTINE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel 'Justine' (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
JUSTUS   m   German, Dutch, Late Roman
Latin name which meant "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
JUTTA   f   German
Probably a medieval Low German form of JUDITH. It might also derive from a Germanic name such as JUDDA.
KAI (1)   m   Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.
KAREN (1)   f   Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, English
Danish short form of KATHERINE. It became common in the English-speaking world after the 1930s.
KARIN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, English
Swedish short form of KATHERINE.
KARINA   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Polish, German, Russian, English
Elaborated form of KARIN.
KARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KARLA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian
German, Scandinavian and Croatian feminine form of CHARLES.
KARLMANN   m   German (Archaic)
German form of CARLOMAN.
KAROLA   f   Hungarian, German
Hungarian and German feminine form of CAROLUS.
KAROLINE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
KARSTEN   m   Low German, Danish, Norwegian
Low German form of CHRISTIAN.
KASIMIR   m   German (Rare)
German form of CASIMIR.
KASIMIRA   f   German (Archaic)
Feminine form of KASIMIR.
KASPAR   m   German
German form of JASPER.
KATARINE   f   German (Rare)
German form of KATHERINE.
KATHARINA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German form of KATHERINE.
KATHARINE   f   English, German
English variant of KATHERINE and German variant of KATHARINA. A famous bearer was American actress Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003).
KÄTHE   f   German
German diminutive of KATHERINE.
KATHERINA   f   English (Rare), German
Latinate form of KATHERINE. Shakespeare used this name in his play 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593).
KATHRIN   f   German
German short form of KATHARINA.
KATINKA   f   German, Hungarian, Dutch
German diminutive of KATHARINA, a Hungarian diminutive of KATALIN and a Dutch diminutive of CATHARINA.
KATRIN   f   German, Swedish, Estonian
German, Swedish and Estonian short form of KATHERINE.
KATRINA   f   English, German, Swedish, Dutch
Variant of CATRIONA. It is also a German, Swedish and Dutch contracted form of KATHERINE.
KERSTIN   f   Swedish, German
Swedish form of CHRISTINA.
KEVIN   m   English, Irish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the 20th century.
KIKI   f   English, German, Greek
Diminutive of names beginning with or containing the sound K.
KILIAN   m   German, Irish, French
German form and Irish and French variant of CILLIAN.
KINGE   f   German
Diminutive of KUNIGUNDE.
KLAAS   m   Dutch, Low German
Dutch and Low German short form of NICHOLAS.
KLAUS   m   German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish
German short form of NICHOLAS.
KLEMENS   m   German, Danish, Swedish, Polish
German, Danish, Swedish and Polish form of Clemens (see CLEMENT). Prince Klemens Metternich was a 19th-century Austrian chancellor who guided the Austrian Empire to victory in the Napoleonic Wars.
KNUT   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Derived from Old Norse knútr meaning "knot". Knut was a Danish prince who defeated Æðelræd II, king of England, in the early 11th century and became the ruler of Denmark, Norway and England.
KOLMAN   m   German (Rare)
Variant of KOLOMAN.
KOLOMAN   m   German (Rare), Slovak
German and Slovak form of COLMÁN. Saint Koloman (also called Coloman or Colman) was an Irish monk who was martyred in Stockerau in Austria.
KONRAD   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Slovene
German, Scandinavian, Polish and Slovene form of CONRAD.
KONSTANZE   f   German
German form of CONSTANTIA.
KORA   f   German
German variant of CORA.
KORBINIAN   m   German
Derived from Latin corvus meaning "raven". This was the name of an 8th-century Frankish saint who was sent by Pope Gregory II to evangelize in Bavaria. His real name may have been Hraban (see Raban).
KÖRBL   m   German
Diminutive of KORBINIAN.
KORD   m   German
German contracted form of CONRAD.
KORNELIA   f   German, Polish
German and Polish form of CORNELIA.
KRESZENTIA   f   German (Rare)
German feminine form of CRESCENTIUS.
KRESZENZ   f   German (Rare)
German feminine form of CRESCENTIUS.
KRIEMHILD   f   German (Rare), Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements grim "mask" and hild "battle". Kriemhild was a beautiful heroine in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', where she is the sister of Günther and the wife of Siegfried. After her husband is killed by Hagen with the consent of Günther, Kriemhild tragically exacts her revenge.
KRIEMHILDE   f   German
Variant of KRIEMHILD.
KRIMHILDE   f   German (Rare)
Variant of KRIEMHILD.
KRISTA   f   German, English, Finnish
Short form of KRISTINA.
KRISTIANE   f   German
German form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTIN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, English
Scandinavian and German form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTINE   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, English, German
Scandinavian form of CHRISTINE, as well as an English and German variant.
KUNIBERT   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuni "clan, family" and beraht "bright".
KUNIGUNDE   f   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic element kuni "clan, family" combined with gund "war". Saint Kunigunde was the wife of Holy Roman Emperor Henry II.
KUNO   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic kuni meaning "clan, family".
KURT   m   German, English
German contracted form of CONRAD. A famous bearer was the American musician Kurt Cobain (1967-1994).
LAMBERT   m   German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements land "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
LARA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LARS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German
Scandinavian form of LAURENCE (1).
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LAURENZ   m   German
German form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LEBERECHT   m   German (Rare)
Means "live rightly" from German lebe "live" and recht "right". This name was created in the 17th century.
LENA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LENE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of HELENE or MAGDALENE.
LENI   f   German
German diminutive of HELENE or MAGDALENA.
LENNART   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Low German, Dutch
Swedish and Low German form of LEONARD.
LENZ   m   German
Short form of LORENZ. This is also a German poetic word referring to the springtime.
LEO   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEON   m   English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEONA   f   English, German
Feminine form of LEON.
LEONARD   m   English, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements levon "lion" and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, though it did not become common there until the 19th century.
LEONHARD   m   German
German form of LEONARD. Leonhard Euler was a Swiss mathematician who made many important contributions to calculus, number theory, geometry and theoretical physics.
LEONIE   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch feminine form of LEONIUS.
LEONORE   f   German
German short form of ELEANOR.
LEOPOLD   m   German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).
LIANE   f   German
Short form of JULIANE.
LIES   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH.
LIESA   f   German
German diminutive of ELISABETH.
LIESE   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH.
LIESEL   f   German
German diminutive of ELISABETH.
LIESELOTTE   f   German
Variant of LISELOTTE.
LIESL   f   German
German short form of ELISABETH.
LILI   f   German, French, Hungarian
German, French and Hungarian diminutive of ELISABETH, also sometimes connected to the German word lilie meaning "lily". In Hungarian, it can also be diminutive of KAROLINA or JÚLIA.
LILLI   f   German, Finnish
German variant of LILI and a Finnish variant of LILJA.
LILO   f   German
Short form of LISELOTTE.
LINDA   f   English, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LINUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.
LISA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of ELIZABETH, ELISABETH, ELISABET or ELISABETTA. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the 'Mona Lisa', the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.
LISBETH   f   German
German short form of ELISABETH.
LISELOTTE   f   Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
Contraction of LISE and CHARLOTTE.
LORE (1)   f   German
German contracted form of ELEONORE.
LORENZ   m   German
German form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOTHAR   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Chlodochar meaning "famous army", derived from the elements hlud "famous" and hari "army". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish king, the son of Louis I, who ruled the region called Lorraine. It was also borne by medieval kings of France, Italy and the Holy Roman Empire.
LOUISA   f   English, German, Dutch
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of 'Little Women'.
LOUISE   f   French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LUCA (1)   m   Italian, Romanian, German
Italian and Romanian form of LUKE. This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
LUCIA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUDGER   m   German, Dutch
From the Germanic name Leudagar which was derived from the elements leud "people" and ger "spear". Saint Ludger was an 8th-century Frisian Benedictine bishop who founded a monastery at Munster.
LUDOLF   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hludwolf which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wolf "wolf".
LUDWIG   m   German
From the Germanic name Chlodovech, which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman Emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
LUISE   f   German
German form of LOUISE.
LUITGARD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Leutgard which was derived from the elements leud "people" and gard "enclosure". This was the name of a 13th-century Flemish nun, the patron saint of easy deliveries.
LUITGER   m   German (Archaic)
Variant of LUDGER.
LUITPOLD   m   German (Rare)
German variant of LEOPOLD.
LUKAS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian
German, Scandinavian and Lithuanian form of LUKE.
LULU (1)   f   German
Diminutive of names that begin with Lu, especially LUISE.
LUTGARD   f   German (Archaic)
Variant of LUITGARD.
LUTZ   m   German
German diminutive of LUDWIG.
LUZIA   f   Portuguese, German
Portuguese and German form of LUCIA.
LYDIA   f   English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
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