Names Categorized "elder scrolls characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include elder scrolls characters.
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ADARA   f   Hebrew
Means "noble" in Hebrew.
ADRIANNE   f   English
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
AGRIPPINA   f   Ancient Roman
Feminine derivative of AGRIPPA. This name was borne by the scheming mother of the Roman emperor Nero, who eventually had her killed. This was also the name of a 3rd-century Roman saint who is venerated in Sicily.
ALAIN   m   French
French form of ALAN.
ALEA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AALIYAH.
ALESSANDRA   f   Italian
Italian form of ALEXANDRA.
ALEXIA   f   French, English (Modern)
Feminine form of ALEXIS.
ALFHILD   f   Norwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Alfhildr which was composed of the elements alfr "elf" and hildr "battle". In Norse legend Alfhild was a maiden who disguised herself as a warrior in order to avoid marriage to king Alf. Her life was perhaps based on that of a 9th-century Viking pirate.
ALVA (1)   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Feminine form of ALF (1).
ANGELINE   f   French
French diminutive of ANGELA.
ANISE   f   English (Rare)
From the English word for the herb, also called aniseed.
ANWEN   f   Welsh
Means "very beautiful" in Welsh.
ARCADIA   f   Various
Feminine form of ARCADIUS. This is the name of a region on the Greek Peloponnese, long idealized for its natural beauty.
ARON   m   Polish, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Polish, Croatian and Scandinavian form of AARON.
ARVEL   m   English
Meaning unknown, possibly a variant of ARWEL.
ÁSBJÖRN   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the elements áss "god" and björn "bear". It is therefore a cognate of OSBORN.
ASTA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of ASTRID.
ASTRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
AZURA   f   English (Rare)
Elaboration of AZURE.
BABETTE   f   French
French diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BENDT   m   Danish
Danish form of BENEDICT.
BJARTUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of Bjartr (see BJARTE).
BLAISE   m   French
From the Roman name Blasius which meant "lisping" from Latin blaesus. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).
BOR   m   Slovene
Short form of names containing bor, such as BORISLAV or BORIS. It is also a South Slavic word meaning "pine tree".
BRAITH   m   English (Australian)
Meaning uncertain, perhaps from Welsh brith, braith meaning "speckled".
BRAN (1)   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran was a mariner who was involved in several adventures.
CAIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman variant of GAIUS.
CALIXTO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CALIXTUS.
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CARLOTTA   f   Italian
Italian form of CHARLOTTE.
CASSIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin cassus "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CHRISTER   m   Swedish, Danish
Swedish and Danish diminutive of CHRISTIAN.
CICERO   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "chickpea" from Latin cicer. Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero) was a statesman, orator and author of the 1st century BC.
CIEL   f   Various
Means "sky" in French. It is not used as a given name in France itself.
CLINTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
COLETTE   f   French
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).
CONSTANCE   f   English, French
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CONSTANTIUS   m   Late Roman
Late Latin name which was a derivative of CONSTANS.
DAGNY   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Dagný, which was derived from the elements dagr "day" and "new".
DAGUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of DAG.
DANICA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Czech, Macedonian, English
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
DARIUS   m   English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush, which was composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.... [more]
DELPHINE   f   French
French form of DELPHINA.
DORIAN   m   English, French
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians, or from the surname DORAN.
DORTHE   f   Danish
Danish form of DOROTHY.
EDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
EDWINA   f   English
Feminine form of EDWIN.
ELAM   m   Biblical
Possibly means either "hidden" or "eternity" in Hebrew. This was the name of several characters in the Old Testament, including a son of Shem who was the ancestor of the Elamite peoples.
ELDA   f   Italian
Italian form of HILDA.
EMMANUEL   m   Biblical, French, English
From the Hebrew name עִמָּנוּאֵל ('Immanu'el) meaning "God is with us". This was the foretold name of the Messiah in the Old Testament. It has been used in England since the 16th century in the spellings Emmanuel and Immanuel, though it has not been widespread. The name has been more common in continental Europe, especially in Spain and Portugal (in the spellings Manuel and Manoel).
ENNIS   f & m   Irish
From the name of a town in Ireland.
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERIS   f   Greek Mythology
Means "strife" in Greek. In Greek mythology Eris was the goddess of discord. She was the sister and companion of Ares.
ERLENDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ERLAND.
ÉTIENNE   m   French
French form of STEPHEN.
EVETTE   f   English
Variant of YVETTE.
EYDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey "good fortune" or "island" and dís "goddess".
FALK   m   German
Means "falcon" in German.
FESTUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman cognomen which possibly meant "festival, holiday" in Latin. This was the name of a Roman official in the New Testament.
FRANÇOIS   m   French
French form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). François Villon was a French lyric poet of the 15th century. This was also the name of two kings of France.
FRIDA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
GABRIELLA   f   Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GAIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman praenomen, or given name, of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from Latin gaudere "to rejoice", though it may be of unknown Etruscan origin. This was a very common Roman praenomen, the most famous bearers being Gaius Julius Caesar, the great leader of the Roman Republic, and his adopted son Gaius Octavius (later known as Augustus), the first Roman emperor. This name also appears in the New Testament belonging to a bishop of Ephesus who is regarded as a saint.
GALLUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which meant "rooster" in Latin. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint, a companion of Saint Columbanus, who later became a hermit in Switzerland.
GEMMA   f   Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GERDA (1)   f   German, Dutch
Feminine form of GERD (1).
GIANNA   f   Italian, Greek
Italian short form of GIOVANNA and a modern Greek variant of IOANNA.
GREGOR   m   German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of GREGORY. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
GRETA   f   German, Swedish, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GUL   m & f   Urdu, Pashto
Means "flower, rose" in Urdu and Pashto, ultimately from Persian.
GUNNAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of GÜNTHER). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
GWENDOLYN   f   Welsh, English
Variant of GWENDOLEN.
HÁKON   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of HÅKON, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
HARAN   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Possibly means "hill, mountain" in Hebrew. This is the name of the brother of Abraham and father of Lot in the Old Testament.
HILDE   f   German, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian variant of HILDA.
HILLEVI   f   Swedish, Finnish
Swedish and Finnish form of HEILWIG.
HULDA (1)   f   Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "sweet, lovable".
IAN   m   Scottish, English
Scottish form of JOHN.
INGE   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
INGRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
IONA (1)   f   English, Scottish
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
JEANNE   f   French, English
Modern French form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Joan of Arc is known as Jeanne d'Arc in France.
JESPER   m   Danish
Danish form of JASPER.
JIM   m   English
Medieval diminutive of JAMES.
JON (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Basque
Scandinavian and Basque form of JOHN.
JONNA   f   Danish, Swedish, Finnish
Short form of JOHANNA.
JÖRDIS   f   German
German form of HJÖRDÍS.
JÖRGEN   m   Swedish
Swedish form of JÜRGEN.
JULIENNE   f   French
French feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).
JURGEN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GEORGE.
KAI (1)   m   Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.
KARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KAYE   f   English
Variant of KAY (1).
KNUD   m   Danish
Danish form of KNUT.
LARS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German
Scandinavian form of LAURENCE (1).
LEONTIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of LEONTIOS.
LISBET   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of ELISABET.
LISETTE   f   French, English
Diminutive of ÉLISABETH.
LLEWELLYN   m   Welsh
Variant of LLEWELYN.
LOUIS   m   French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LUCAN   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Lucanus, which was derived from the name of the city of Luca in Tuscany (modern Lucca). Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, commonly called Lucan, was a 1st-century Roman poet.
LUCIA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LYDIA   f   English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
MARA (1)   f   Biblical
Means "bitter" in Hebrew. This is a name taken by Naomi in the Old Testament (see Ruth 1:20).
MARCEL   m   French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Form of MARCELLUS. A notable bearer was the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922).
MARGRÉT   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of MARGARET.
MARISE   f   French
French diminutive of MARIE.
MARKUS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
German, Scandinavian and Finnish form of MARK.
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MATÚŠ   m   Slovak
Slovak form of MATTHEW, used to refer to the evangelist and apostle also known as Levi.
MAURICE   m   English, French
From the Roman name Mauritius, a derivative of MAURUS. Saint Maurice was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Egypt. He and the other Christians in his legion were supposedly massacred on the orders of emperor Maximian for refusing to worship Roman gods. Thus, he is the patron saint of infantry soldiers.... [more]
MICHEL   m   French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MIKAEL   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Scandinavian and Finnish form of MICHAEL.
MILA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILOŠ   m   Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu "gracious, dear". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian hero who apparently killed the Ottoman sultan Murad I at the Battle of Kosovo.
MIRABELLE   f   French (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MURIEL   f   English, French, Irish
Medieval English form of a Celtic name which was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel 'John Halifax, Gentleman' (1856).
NASH   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer of the surname was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015). The name was popularized in the 1990s by the television series 'Nash Bridges'.
NEVIL   m   English (Rare)
Variant of NEVILLE.
NILS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of NICHOLAS.
NURA   f   Arabic
Strictly feminine form of NUR.
OLAF   m   Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
ORLA (2)   m   Danish
Danish name, meaning unknown.
PELAGIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Πελαγιος (Pelagios), which was derived from πελαγος (pelagos) "the sea". This was the name of several saints and two popes.
QUENTIN   m   French, English
French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England. In America it was brought to public attention by president Theodore Roosevelt's son Quentin Roosevelt (1897-1918), who was killed in World War I.
QUINTUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "fifth" in Latin. It was traditionally given to the fifth child, or possibly a child born in the fifth month. This was a common praenomen, being more popular than the other numeric Roman names. A notable bearer was the poet Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus).
RAGNAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian cognate of RAYNER.
RAVEN   f & m   English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
RIA   f   German, Dutch
Short form of MARIA.
RIGEL   m   Astronomy
Derived from Arabic الرجل (al-Rijl) meaning "foot". This is the name of the star that forms the left foot of the constellation Orion.
RIKKE   f   Danish
Danish short form of FREDERIKKE.
RUNA   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Feminine form of RUNE.
RUNE   m   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore".
SABINE   f   French, German, Danish
French, German and Danish form of SABINA.
SALMA   f   Arabic
Means "safe", derived from Arabic سلم (salima) "to be safe".
SAMUEL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.... [more]
SAPPHIRE   f   English (Rare)
From the name of the gemstone, the blue birthstone of September, which is derived from Greek σαπφειρος (sappheiros), ultimately from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir).
SEREN   f   Welsh
Means "star" in Welsh.
SERGIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name, possibly meaning "servant" in Latin but most likely of unknown Etruscan origin. Saint Sergius was a 4th-century Roman officer who was martyred in Syria with his companion Bacchus. They are the patron saints of Christian desert nomads. Another saint by this name (in the Russian form Sergey) was a 14th-century Russian spiritual leader. The name was also borne by four popes.
SEVAN   f & m   Armenian
From the name of the largest lake in Armenia, which may be from the Urartian word suinia simply meaning "lake".
SHEL   m   English
Short form of SHELDON.
SIGRID   f   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SIGURD   m   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and varðr "guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga', which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
SILVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SOFIE   f   German, Danish, Dutch, Czech
Form of SOPHIE.
STAR   f   English
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.
SUSANNA   f   Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
From Σουσαννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.... [more]
SVEN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn which meant "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
SYBILLE   f   German, French
German and French form of SIBYL.
TACITUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "silent, mute" in Latin. This was the name of a 1st-century Roman historian.
TAMIKA   f   English
Variant of TAMIKO, inspired by the American jazz singer Tamiko Jones (1945-) or the American movie 'A Girl Named Tamiko' (1963).
TITUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to Latin titulus "title of honour". It is more likely of Oscan origin, since it was borne by the legendary Sabine king Titus Tatius.... [more]
TORSTEN   m   Swedish, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".
TULLIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Latin form of TULLIO.
URIEL   m   Biblical, Hebrew
From the Hebrew name אוּרִיאֵל ('Uri'el) which meant "God is my light". Uriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition. He is mentioned only in the Apocrypha, for example in the Book of Enoch where he warns Noah of the coming flood.
VERNER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of WERNER.
VIOLA   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
VITTORIA   f   Italian
Italian form of VICTORIA.
VIVIENNE   f   French
French form of VIVIANA.
WILHELM   m   German, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of WILLIAM. This was the name of two German Emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
XANDER   m   Dutch, English (Modern)
Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).
ZARIA   f   English (Modern)
Possibly based on ZAHRAH or the Nigerian city of Zaria.
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