Scandinavian Names

Scandinavian names are used in the Scandinavia region of northern Europe. For more specific lists, see Swedish names, Danish names and Norwegian names. See also about Scandinavian names.
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KRISTOFFER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of CHRISTOPHER.
LÆRKE   f   Danish
Means "lark" in Danish.
LAILA (2)   f   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish
Scandinavian and Finnish form of LÁILÁ.
LÁRA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of LAURA.
LARS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German
Scandinavian form of LAURENCE (1).
LÁRUS   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of LAURENCE (1).
LASSE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Scandinavian and Finnish form of LAURENCE (1).
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LAURITS   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURITZ   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LEIF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendant, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.
LEIFUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of LEIF.
LEIV   m   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of LEIF.
LELLE   m   Swedish
Diminutive of LENNART.
LENA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LENE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of HELENE or MAGDALENE.
LENNART   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Low German, Dutch
Swedish and Low German form of LEONARD.
LEO   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LILJA   f   Icelandic, Finnish
Icelandic and Finnish cognate of LILY.
LILLY   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
English variant of LILY. It is also used in Scandinavia, as a form of LILY or a diminutive of ELISABETH.
LINA (2)   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Croatian
Short form of names ending in lina.
LINDA   f   English, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LINE   f   Danish, Norwegian, French
Short form of CAROLINE and other names ending in line.
LINN   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Short form of LINNÉA and other names containing the same sound.
LINNÉA   f   Swedish
From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.
LINUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.
LIS   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Short form of ELISABET.
LISA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of ELIZABETH, ELISABETH, ELISABET or ELISABETTA. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the 'Mona Lisa', the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.
LISBET   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of ELISABET.
LISELOTT   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of LISELOTTE.
LISELOTTE   f   Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
Contraction of LISE and CHARLOTTE.
LISS   f   Norwegian
Short form of ELISABET.
LISSI   f   Danish
Diminutive of ELISABET.
LIV (1)   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from the Old Norse name Hlíf meaning "protection". Its use has been influenced by the modern Scandinavian word liv meaning "life".
LOKE   m   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of LOKI.
LONE   f   Danish
Short form of ABELONE.
LORENS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of LAURENCE (1).
LOTTA   f   Swedish, Finnish
Short form of CHARLOTTA.
LOTTIE   f   English, Swedish
Diminutive of CHARLOTTE or LISELOTTE.
LOUISE   f   French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LOVE (1)   m   Swedish
Swedish form of LOUIS.
LOVISA   f   Swedish
Swedish feminine form of LOUIS.
LOVISE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian feminine form of LOUIS.
LUCIA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUDDE   m   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of LUDVIG.
LUDVIG   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of LUDWIG.
LUKAS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian
German, Scandinavian and Lithuanian form of LUKE.
LÚÐVÍK   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of LUDWIG.
LÝDIA   f   Slovak, Faroese
Slovak and Faroese form of LYDIA.
LYKKE   f   Danish
Means "good fortune, happiness" in Danish.
MADELEINE   f   French, English, Swedish
French form of MAGDALENE.
MADS   m   Danish
Danish short form of MATHIAS.
MÆJA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic diminutive of MARIA.
MAGNE   m   Norwegian
Modern form of MAGNI as well as a variant of MAGNUS.
MAGNHILD   f   Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse magn "mighty, strong" and hildr "battle". This was the name of a novel by the Norwegian author Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson.
MAGNUS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "great". It was borne by a 7th-century saint who was a missionary in Germany. It became popular in Scandinavia after the time of the 11th-century Norwegian king Magnus I, who was said to have been named after Charlemagne, or Carolus Magnus in Latin (however there was also a Norse name Magni). The name was borne by six subsequent kings of Norway as well as three kings of Sweden. It was imported to Scotland and Ireland during the Middle Ages.
MAIKEN   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian diminutive of MARIA.
MAJKEN   f   Danish, Swedish
Variant of MAIKEN.
MALENA   f   Swedish, Spanish, Czech
Swedish and Spanish short form of MAGDALENA, and a Czech short form of MAHULENA.
MALENE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of MAGDALENA.
MALIN   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian short form of MAGDALENE.
MALTE   m   Danish, Swedish, German
Short form of the Germanic name HELMOLD.
MALTHE   m   Danish, German
Variant of MALTE.
MARCUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was probably derived from the name of the Roman god MARS. This was among the most popular of the Roman praenomina. Famous bearers include Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.
MAREN   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of MARINA.
MARGARETHE   f   German, Danish
German and Danish form of MARGARET.
MARGIT   f   Hungarian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, German
Hungarian and Scandinavian form of MARGARET.
MARGRÉT   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of MARGARET.
MARGRETE   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of MARGARET.
MARGRETHE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of MARGARET. This is the name of the current queen of Denmark (1940-).
MARI (1)   f   Welsh, Breton, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Welsh, Breton, Estonian and Finnish form of MARIA, as well as a Hungarian diminutive of MÁRIA. It is also a Scandinavian form of MARIE.
MARÍA   f & m   Spanish, Galician, Icelandic
Spanish, Galician and Icelandic form of MARIA. It is occasionally used as a masculine middle name in Spanish-speaking regions.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIANNE   f   French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Originally a French diminutive of MARIE. It is also considered a combination of MARIE and ANNE (1). Shortly after the formation of the French Republic in 1792, a female figure by this name was adopted as the symbol of the state.
MARIE   f   French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.
MARIT   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian form of MARGARET.
MARITA (2)   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian form of MARGARET.
MARIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French
Roman family name which was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MARK   m   English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical
Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.... [more]
MARKUS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
German, Scandinavian and Finnish form of MARK.
MARNA   f   Danish
Danish short form of MARINA.
MÄRTA   f   Swedish
Swedish short form of MARGARETA.
MARTE   f   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of MARTHA.
MÅRTEN   m   Swedish
Swedish form of Martinus (see MARTIN).
MARTHA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.... [more]
MARTHE   f   French, Norwegian
French and Norwegian form of MARTHA.
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MARTINA   f   German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
MARTINE   f   French, Dutch, Norwegian
French, Dutch and Norwegian feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN).
MATILDA   f   English, Swedish, Finnish
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.... [more]
MATS   m   Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian short form of MATTHIAS.
MATTEUS   m   Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian form of MATTHEW, used to refer to the evangelist and apostle also known as Levi.
MATTHIAS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
MATTIAS   m   German, Swedish
Variant of MATTHIAS.
MAX   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).
MAXIMILIAN   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman Emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.
MELKER   m   Swedish
Swedish form of MELCHIOR.
MERETE   f   Danish
Danish form of MARGARET.
MERIT (2)   f   Swedish
Variant of MARIT.
META   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian short form of MARGARET.
METTE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish diminutive of MARGARET.
MIA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MICHAEL   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHAELA   f   German, Swedish, English, Czech, Slovak
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MIKAEL   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Scandinavian and Finnish form of MICHAEL.
MIKAELA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Feminine form of MICHAEL.
MIKKEL   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of MICHAEL. It can also derive from the Scandinavian root mikill meaning "enormous".
MIKKELINE   f   Danish
Danish feminine form of MIKKEL.
MIKKJAL   m   Faroese
Faroese form of MICHAEL.
MILLA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Short form of CAMILLA and other names that end in milla.
MILLY   f   Swedish, Norwegian, English
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MIMMI   f   Swedish, Finnish
Diminutive of VILHELMINA or VILHELMIINA.
MOA   f   Swedish
Possibly derived from Swedish moder meaning "mother". This was the pen name of the Swedish author Moa Martinson (real name Helga Maria Martinson).
MOGENS   m   Danish
Danish form of MAGNUS.
MONA (2)   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of MONIKA.
MORTEN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of MARTIN.
MY   f   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of MARIA.
NANNA (1)   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Norse nanþ meaning "daring, brave". In Norse legend she was a goddess who died of grief when her husband Balder was killed.
NATALIE   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
NATHALIE   f   French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
French form of NATALIE, as well as a Dutch, German and Scandinavian variant.
NEA   f   Swedish, Finnish
Short form of LINNÉA.
NELS   m   Danish
Danish variant of NILS.
NIELS (1)   m   Danish
Danish form of NICHOLAS. A famous bearer was Niels Bohr (1885-1962), a Danish physicist who investigated the structure of atoms.
NIKLAS   m   Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Norwegian, German
Swedish form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAJ   m   Danish, Slovene
Danish and Slovene form of NICHOLAS.
NILS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of NICHOLAS.
NINA (1)   f   Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NJÅL   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of NJÁLL.
NJÁLA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic feminine form of NJÁLL.
NJÁLL   m   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Niall (see NEIL). This is the name of the hero of a 13th century Icelandic saga, based on the life of a 10th-century Icelandic chieftain.
NJORD   m   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Old Norse Njörðr, which was possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ner meaning "strong, vigourous". Njord was the Norse god of the sea, sailing, fishing and fertility. With his children Freyr and Freya he was a member of the Vanir.
NOAK   m   Swedish
Swedish form of NOAH (1).
NORA   f   Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).
ODA   f   German, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Odo (see OTTO).
ODD   m   Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse oddr meaning "point of a sword".
ODDMUND   m   Norwegian
Possibly a modern coinage based on the Old Norse elements oddr "point of a sword" and mundr "protection".
ØIVIND   m   Norwegian
Variant of ØYVIND.
OLA (1)   m   Norwegian, Swedish
Norwegian and Swedish short form of OLAF.
OLAF   m   Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
ÓLAFUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of OLAF.
OLAV   m   Norwegian, Danish
Variant of OLAF.
ÓLAVUR   m   Faroese
Faroese form of OLAF.
OLE   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of OLAF.
OLGA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLIVER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
OLLE   m   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of OLAF.
OLOF   m   Swedish
Swedish form of OLAF.
OLOV   m   Swedish
Swedish form of OLAF.
OLUF   m   Danish
Danish variant of OLAF.
ÖRJAN   m   Swedish
Medieval Swedish form of JURIAN.
ØRJAN   m   Norwegian
Medieval Norwegian form of JURIAN.
ORLA (2)   m   Danish
Danish name, meaning unknown.
ORVAR   m   Swedish, Norse Mythology
Means "arrow" in Old Norse. Orvar Odd is a legendary Norse hero who is the subject of a 13th-century Icelandic saga.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
ÓSKAR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of OSCAR.
OSKAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish
Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of OSCAR. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
OSVALD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian cognate of OSWALD.
ÓÐINN   m   Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of ODIN.
OTTILIA   f   Swedish
Swedish form of ODILIA.
OTTO   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
OTTÓ   m   Hungarian, Icelandic
Hungarian and Icelandic form of OTTO.
OVE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Probably a modern form of the Old Danish name Aghi, originally a short form of names that contain the Old Norse element ag "edge of a sword" or agi "terror".
ØYDIS   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of EYDÍS.
ØYSTEIN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of EYSTEINN.
ØYVIND   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Eyvindr, which was derived from ey meaning "island" or "good fortune" and vindr possibly meaning "victor".
PÅL   m   Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian form of PAUL.
PÁLA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic feminine form of PAUL.
PÁLL   m   Icelandic, Faroese
Icelandic and Faroese form of PAUL.
PALLE   m   Danish
Danish diminutive of PAUL.
PATRIK   m   Swedish, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Hungarian
Form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PAUL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
PAULA   f   German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
PAULINA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Swedish, Lithuanian, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAULINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PEDER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of PETER.
PEER   m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Variant of PER. The Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen used this name for the main character in his play 'Peer Gynt' (1867).
PEHR   m   Swedish
Swedish variant of PER.
PELLE   m   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of PER.
PER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Breton
Scandinavian and Breton form of PETER.
PERNILLA   f   Swedish
Swedish short form of PETRONILLA.
PERNILLE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of PETRONILLA.
PETER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.... [more]
PETRA   f   German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
PETRONELLA   f   Dutch, Swedish
Dutch and Swedish form of PETRONILLA.
PETTER   m   Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian form of PETER.
PÉTUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of PETER.
PETUR   m   Faroese
Faroese form of PETER.
PHILIP   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Greek name Φιλιππος (Philippos) which means "friend of horses", composed of the elements φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.... [more]
PIERRE   m   French, Swedish
French form of PETER. This name was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and by Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
PONTUS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of PONTIUS.
POUL   m   Danish
Danish form of PAUL.
PREBEN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Modern Danish form of the name Pridbjørn, which was a medieval Scandinavian form of the Slavic (Wendish) name Pridbor, which was derived from Slavic prid "first" and borti "battle". It was imported into Danish via the medieval Putbus family, who were Slavic nobles from Rügen in Pomerania.
RAGNA   f   Icelandic, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Ancient Scandinavian
Short form of Old Norse names beginning with the element regin "advice, counsel".
RAGNAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian cognate of RAYNER.
RAGNHEIÐUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of RAGNHEIÐR.
RAGNHILD   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ragnhildr, composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and hildr "battle".
RAGNHILDUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of RAGNHILD.
RAGNVALD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of RAGNVALDR.
RAKEL   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic
Scandinavian form of RACHEL.
RALPH   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
RANDI (2)   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Modern form of the Old Norse name Ragnfríðr, which was derived from regin "advice, counsel" and fríðr "beautiful".
RASMUS   m   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian form of ERASMUS.
REBECCA   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name רִבְקָה (Rivqah) from an unattested root probably meaning "join, tie, snare". This is the name of the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob in the Old Testament. It came into use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular with the Puritans in the 17th century.
REBECKA   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of REBECCA.
REBEKKA   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Faroese, Finnish, Biblical Greek
Cognate of REBECCA. It is also the form used in the Greek Old Testament.
REGINA   f   English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
REGINE   f   German, Norwegian
German and Norwegian form of REGINA.
REIDAR   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hreiðarr which was derived from the elements hreiðr "nest, home" and arr "warrior".
REIDUN   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Hreiðunn which was derived from the elements hreiðr "nest, home" and unnr "to wave, to billow".
RENATE   f   German, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian feminine form of RENATUS.
RIKA   f   Swedish, Dutch
Short form of FREDRIKA, HENRIKA, and other names ending in rika.
RIKARD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of RICHARD.
RIKKE   f   Danish
Danish short form of FREDERIKKE.
RITA   f   Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
ROALD   m   Norwegian
Modern form of the Old Norse name Hróðvaldr or Hróaldr, composed of the elements hróðr "fame" and valdr "ruler". This name was borne by the children's author Roald Dahl (1916-1990).
ROAR   m   Norwegian
Newer Scandinavian form of HRÓARR.
RÓBERT   m   Hungarian, Slovak, Icelandic
Hungarian and Icelandic form of ROBERT.
ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROBIN   m & f   English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROFFE   m   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of ROLF.
ROGER   m   English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
ROLAND   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and land meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROLF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
RONJA   f   Swedish
Invented by Swedish children's author Astrid Lindgren, who based it on the middle portion of Juronjaure, the name of a lake in Sweden. Lindgren used it in her book 'Ronia the Robber's Daughter' (Ronia is the English translation).
ROSA (1)   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
RUBEN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Armenian, Biblical Latin
Scandinavian, Dutch, French and Armenian form of REUBEN. This was the name of an 11th-century Armenian ruler of Cilicia.
RUDOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel 'The Prisoner of Zenda' (1894).
RÚNA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of RUNA.
RUNA   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Feminine form of RUNE.
RÚNAR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of RUNAR.
RUNAR   m   Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements rún "secret lore" and arr "warrior". This name did not exist in Old Norse, but was created in the modern era.
RUNE   m   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore".
RÚNI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Faroese
Old Norse and Faroese form of RUNE.
RUTH (1)   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.... [more]
SABINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
SABINE   f   French, German, Danish
French, German and Danish form of SABINA.
SAGA   f   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Icelandic
Possibly means "seeing one" in Old Norse. This was the name of the Norse goddess of poetry and history, sometimes identified with the goddess Frigg. This is also a modern Swedish word meaning "story, fairy tale".
SALOMON   m   French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
French and Scandinavian form of SOLOMON.
SAMUEL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.... [more]
SANDER   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Dutch and Scandinavian short form of ALEXANDER.
SANDRA   f   Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887). A famous bearer is American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).
SANNA   f   Swedish, Finnish
Short form of SUSANNA. It can also be derived from Swedish sann meaning "true".
SANNE   f   Dutch, Danish
Dutch and Danish short form of SUSANNA.
SASSA   f   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of ASTRID, ALEXANDRA or SARAH.
SEBASTIAN   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian
From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.... [more]
SELMA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.
SEVERIN   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian form of SEVERINUS.
SIBYLLA   f   Greek, German, Swedish, Late Roman, Late Greek
Greek and Latinate form of SIBYL.
SIF   f   Norse Mythology, Danish, Icelandic
Variant of SIV.
SIGFRID (1)   m   Swedish
Swedish form of SIEGFRIED.
SIGFRID (2)   f   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of SIGRID.
SIGGE   m   Swedish
Diminutive of SIGMUND, SIGFRID (1), and other Germanic names beginning with the element sigu which means "victory".
SIGMUND   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SIGNE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of SIGNY.
SIGNY   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of SIGNÝ.
SIGNÝ   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse name which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and "new". In Norse legend she was the twin sister of Sigmund and the wife of Siggeir.
SIGRID   f   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SIGRÚN   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and rún "secret". This was the name of a Valkyrie in Norse legend.
SIGRUN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of SIGRÚN.
SIGURD   m   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and varðr "guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga', which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
SIGURÐUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of SIGURD.
SIGVARD   m   Swedish
Swedish form of SIGURD.
SILJE   f   Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish diminutive of CECILIA.
SILLE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of CECILIA.
SIMEN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of SIMON (1).
SIMON (1)   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).... [more]
SINDRE   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of SINDRI.
SINDRI   m   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Possibly means either "small, trivial" or else "sparkling" in Old Norse. In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf who, with his brother Brokk, made many magical items for the gods.
SIRI   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of SIGRID.
SIV   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Means "bride" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology Siv was the wife of Thor.
SIXTEN   m   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Sigsteinn, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and steinn "stone".
SJURD   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of SIGURD.
SNORRE   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of SNORRI.
SNORRI   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse snerra "attack, onslaught". This name was borne by Snorri Sturluson, a 13th-century Icelandic historian and poet, the author of the Prose Edda.
SOFFÍA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of SOPHIA.
SOFIE   f   German, Danish, Dutch, Czech
Form of SOPHIE.
SOLFRID   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse elements sól "sun" and fríðr "beautiful". This name was apparently coined in the 19th century.
SÓLVEIG   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of SOLVEIG.
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