Scandinavian Names

Scandinavian names are used in the Scandinavia region of northern Europe. For more specific lists, see Swedish names, Danish names and Norwegian names. See also about Scandinavian names.
Filter Results     
more options...
STEIN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian cognate of STEN.
STEINAR   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Steinarr, derived from the elements steinn "stone" and arr "warrior".
STELLAN   m   Swedish
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.
STEN   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Derived from the Old Norse name Steinn meaning "stone".
STIAN   m   Norwegian
Modern form of STÍGANDR.
STIG   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of STIGR.
STINA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of CHRISTINA and other names ending in stina.
STINE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of CHRISTINE and other names ending in stine.
STORM   m & f   English (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
STURE   m   Swedish, Medieval Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse stura "to be contrary". This was the name of three viceroys of Sweden.
SUNNIVA   f   Norwegian
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
SUSANN   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian short form of SUSANNE.
SUSANNA   f   Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
From Σουσαννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.... [more]
SUSANNE   f   German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
German and Scandinavian form of SUSANNA.
SVANA   f   Icelandic
Short form of SVANHILDUR.
SVANHILD   f   Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Scandinavian cognate of SWANHILD. In Norse legend she was the daughter of Sigurd and Gudrun.
SVANHILDUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of SVANHILD.
SVANTE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Swedish short form of SVANTEPOLK.
SVEA   f   Swedish
From a personification of the country of Sweden, in use since the 17th century. It is a derivative of Svear, the Swedish name for the ancient Germanic tribe the Swedes. The Swedish name of the country of Sweden is Sverige, a newer form of Svea rike meaning "the realm of the Svear".
SVEIN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of SVEN.
SVEN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn which meant "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
SVEND   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of SVEN.
SVERRE   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Sverrir which meant "wild, swinging, spinning".
SVERRIR   m   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of SVERRE, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
SYLVESTER   m   English, Dutch, Danish, German
Medieval variant of SILVESTER. This is currently the usual English spelling of the name. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a famous bearer.
SYLVI   f   Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish
Norwegian and Swedish variant of SOLVEIG. It is also used as a short form of SYLVIA.
SYLVIA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
SYNNE   f   Norwegian
Short form of SYNNØVE.
SYNNÖVE   f   Swedish
Swedish form of SUNNIVA.
SYNNØVE   f   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of SUNNIVA.
TALLAK   m   Norwegian
Variant of TOLLAK.
TARBEN   m   Danish
Danish form of TORBJÖRN.
TATIANA   f   Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Romanian, Polish, Greek, Georgian, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TEODORA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Polish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Feminine form of Theodoros (see THEODORE).
TERESA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Cognate of THERESA. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse de Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
TERESE   f   Basque, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Basque and Scandinavian form of TERESA.
TERESIA   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of THERESA.
TERJE (1)   m   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of TORGEIR.
TESSAN   f   Swedish
Swedish diminutive of TERESA.
THEODOR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Romanian
German form of THEODORE, as well as a Scandinavian, Czech and Romanian variant of TEODOR. A famous bearer was American children's book creator Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991), better known as Dr. Seuss.
THEÓDÓRA   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of THEODORE.
THERESA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Spanish and Portuguese name Teresa. It was first recorded as Therasia, being borne by the Spanish wife of Saint Paulinus of Nola in the 4th century. The meaning is uncertain, but it could be derived from Greek θερος (theros) "summer", from Greek θεριζω (therizo) "to harvest", or from the name of the Greek island of Therasia (the western island of Santorini).... [more]
THERESE   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German and Scandinavian variant of THERESA.
THERESIA   f   German, Dutch, Swedish
German, Dutch and Swedish form of THERESA.
THOMAS   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.... [more]
ÞÓR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of Þórr (see THOR).
THOR   m   Norse Mythology, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder, war and storms, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.
ÞÓRA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Either a feminine form of Þórr (see THOR) or else a short form of the various Old Norse names beginning with the element Þór. In Norse myth Thora was the wife of the Danish king Ragnar Lodbrok.
THORA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Modern form of ÞÓRA.
THORBEN   m   Danish, German
Variant of TORBEN.
ÞORBJÖRG   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ÞÓRBJÖRG.
ÞORBJÖRN   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of ÞÓRBJÖRN.
THORBJÖRN   m   Swedish
Variant of TORBJÖRN.
THORBJØRN   m   Norwegian
Variant of TORBJØRN.
THORBORG   f   Swedish
Variant of TORBORG.
ÞÓRDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "Thor's goddess" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with Old Norse dís "goddess".
THORE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of TORE (1).
ÞÓRIR   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "Thor's warrior" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with Old Norse vér "warrior, fighter".
THORSTEIN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of TORSTEN.
THORSTEN   m   Swedish, Danish, German
Variant of TORSTEN.
THORVALD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of TORVALD.
THYRA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of TYRA.
TILDA   f   English, Swedish, Finnish
Short form of MATILDA.
TILDE   f   Danish
Short form of MATHILDE.
TIM   m   English, German, Dutch, Slovene, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of TIMOTHY. It was borne by the fictional character Tiny Tim, the ill son of Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843).
TINE (1)   f   Norwegian, Danish
Short form of KRISTINE.
TOBIAS   m   Biblical, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of TOBIAH. This is the name of the hero of the apocryphal Book of Tobit, which appears in many English versions of the Old Testament. It relates how Tobit's son Tobias, with the help of the angel Raphael, is able to drive away a demon who has plagued Sarah, who subsequently becomes his wife. This story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the name came into occasional use in parts of Europe at that time. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation.
TOLLAK   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórleikr, which meant "Thor's play" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with leikr "play, game (involving weapons)".
TÓMAS   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of THOMAS.
TOMAS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Lithuanian
Swedish, Norwegian and Lithuanian form of THOMAS.
TONE (2)   f   Norwegian
Variant of TORNY.
TOR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of Þórr (see THOR). It was not used as a personal name until the 18th century. It is sometimes used as a short form of names of Old Norse origin that begin with the element Tor, which is also from Þórr.
TORA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of ÞÓRA.
TORBEN   m   Danish, German
Danish form of TORBJÖRN.
TORBJØRG   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of ÞÓRBJÖRG.
TORBJÖRN   m   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Þórbjörn, which meant "Thor's bear" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with björn "bear".
TORBJØRN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of TORBJÖRN.
TORBORG   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of ÞÓRBJÖRG.
TORDIS   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of ÞÓRDÍS.
TORE (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Probably from the Old Norse name ÞÓRIR.
TORGEIR   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórgeirr, which meant "Thor's spear" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with geirr "spear".
TORGER   m   Norwegian
Variant of TORGEIR.
TORGILS   m   Norwegian
Modern form of ÞÓRGÍSL.
TORGNY   m   Swedish
From the Old Norse name Þórgnýr meaning "Thor's noise" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with gnýr "noise, grumble, murmur".
TORHILD   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórhildr, which meant "Thor's battle" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with hildr "battle".
TORIL   f   Norwegian
Variant of TORHILD.
TORILL   f   Norwegian
Variant of TORHILD.
TORKEL   m   Norwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Þórketill meaning "Thor's cauldron" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with ketill "cauldron".
TORLEIF   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórleifr meaning "Thor's descendant" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with leifr "descendant, heir".
TORMOD   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórmóðr, which meant "Thor's mind" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with móðr "mind, mood".
TORNY   f   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórný which was derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with "new".
TORØ   f   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of TORA.
TORSTEIN   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of TORSTEN.
TORSTEN   m   Swedish, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".
TORVALD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Þórvaldr, which meant "Thor's ruler" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with valdr "ruler".
TOVA (2)   f   Swedish
Swedish variant of TOVE.
TOVE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of the Old Norse name Tófa, a short form of ÞÓRFRÍÐR.
TRINE   f   Danish
Danish short form of KATRINE.
TROELS   m   Danish
Danish form of ÞÓRGÍSL.
TROND   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse byname Þróndr which indicated a person from Trøndelag, a region in central Norway, possibly derived from þróast meaning "to grow, to prosper".
TRUDE   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of TRUDI.
TRULS   m   Norwegian, Swedish
Norwegian and Swedish form of ÞÓRGÍSL.
TRYGGVE   m   Swedish
Variant of TRYGVE.
TRYGGVI   m   Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of TRYGVE.
TRYGVE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Old Norse tryggr meaning "trustworthy".
TUE   m   Danish
Danish form of TÓFI.
TURE   m   Swedish
Variant of TORE (1).
TURID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of ÞÓRFRÍÐR.
TUVA   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Swedish and Norwegian variant of TOVE.
TYGE   m   Danish
Danish form of TYCHO.
TYKO   m   Swedish
Swedish form of TYCHO.
TYRA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Þýri, a variant of the Norse names ÞÓRVÍ or ÞÓRVEIG.
UFFE   m   Danish
Variant of ULF.
ULF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse byname Úlfr meaning "wolf".
ULLA   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, German
Scandinavian diminutive of ULRIKA or HULDA (1), or a German diminutive of URSULA.
ULRICA   f   Swedish
Feminine form of ULRIC.
ULRIK   m   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian form of ULRICH.
ULRIKA   f   Swedish
Swedish feminine form of ULRICH. This was the name of two queens of Sweden.
ULRIKKE   f   Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish feminine form of ULRICH.
UNN   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of UNNR.
UNNUR   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of UNNR.
URBAN   m   Danish, Swedish, German, Polish, Slovene, Biblical, History
From the Latin name Urbanus which meant "city dweller". This name is mentioned briefly in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. It was subsequently borne by eight popes.
URSULA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
VALDEMAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Scandinavian form of WALDEMAR. This was the name of four kings of Denmark.
VALDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse valr "the dead" and dís "goddess".
VANJA   m & f   Croatian, Serbian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Croatian and Serbian (masculine and feminine) form of VANYA. It is also used in Scandinavia, where it is primarily feminine.
VARG   m   Norwegian
Means "wolf" in Old Norse.
VENDELA   f   Swedish
Swedish feminine form of WENDEL.
VERA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERNER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of WERNER.
VESLEMØY   f   Norwegian
Means "little girl" from Norwegian vesle "little" and møy "girl". This name was created by Norwegian writer Arne Garborg for the main character in his poem 'Haugtussa' (1895).
VESTER   m   Danish
Short form of SYLVESTER.
VIBEKE   f   Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of WIEBKE.
VICTOR   m   English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
VICTORIA   f   English, Spanish, Romanian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Means "victory" in Latin, being borne by the Roman goddess of victory. It is also a feminine form of VICTORIUS. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from North Africa.... [more]
VIDAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse Víðarr, which is possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, he will avenge his father's death.
VIGDÍS   f   Icelandic
Icelandic form of VÍGDÍS.
VIGGO   m   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Short form of names containing the Old Norse element víg "war".
VIKING   m   Swedish, Finnish
From the Old Norse name Víkingr meaning "viking, raider", ultimately from vík "bay, inlet".
VIKTORIA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
German and Scandinavian variant of VICTORIA. It is also a variant transcription of VIKTORIYA.
VILFRED   m   Danish
Danish form of WILFRED.
VILHELM   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish and Hungarian form of WILLIAM.
VILHELMINA   f   Swedish (Rare), Lithuanian (Rare)
Swedish and Lithuanian feminine form of WILLIAM.
VILHJÁLMUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of WILLIAM.
VILLE   m   Finnish, Swedish
Finnish and Swedish diminutive of WILLIAM.
VILMAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of WILLAMAR.
VINCENT   m   English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VIOLA   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
VIRGINIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.... [more]
VITA   f   Ancient Roman, Italian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Danish
Feminine form of VITUS.
VIVEKA   f   Swedish
Swedish form of WIEBKE.
VIVI   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Scandinavian diminutive of names beginning with Vi, as well as OLIVIA and SOFIA.
VIVIAN   m & f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
WALDEMAR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish
Germanic derivative of the Slavic name VLADIMIR (or perhaps a cognate composed of the Germanic elements wald "rule" and meri "famous"). It was introduced into Scandinavia by the 12th-century Danish king Waldemar (or Valdemar) who was named after a royal ancestor of his Ukrainian mother.
WALTER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WERNER   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From a Germanic name derived from warin "guard" combined with hari "army".
YLVA   f   Swedish, Norwegian
Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".
YNGVAR   m   Norwegian
Variant of INGVAR.
YNGVE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of YNGVI.
YVONNE   f   French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French feminine form of YVON. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
Previous Page       1,069 results (this is page 4 of 4)