Names Categorized "producers"

This is a list of names in which the categories include producers.
gender
usage
Aaron m English, French, German, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon), which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses. He acted as a spokesman for his brother when they appealed to the pharaoh to release the Israelites from slavery. Aaron's rod produced miracles and plagues to intimidate the pharaoh. After the departure from Egypt and arrival at Mount Sinai, God installed Aaron as the first high priest of the Israelites and promised that his descendants would form the priesthood.... [more]
Abe 1 m English
Short form of Abraham.
Africa 1 f African American (Rare)
From the name of the continent, which is of Latin origin, possibly from the Afri people who lived near Carthage in North Africa. This rare name is used most often by African-American parents.
Aishath f Dhivehi
Dhivehi form of Aisha.
Alain m French
French form of Alan.
Alessandro m Italian
Italian form of Alexander. A famous bearer was Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), the Italian physicist who invented the battery.
Alexandra f English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of Alexander. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
Alison f English, French
Norman French diminutive of Aalis (see Alice). It was common in England, Scotland and France in the Middle Ages, and was later revived in England in the 20th century via Scotland. Unlike most other English names ending in son, it is not derived from a surname.
Amber f English, Dutch
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel Forever Amber (1944).
Anabel f Spanish
Spanish form of Annabel, also commonly used as a contraction of Ana Isabel.
André m French, Portuguese, Galician, German, Dutch
French, Portuguese and Galician form of Andreas (see Andrew).
Angeline f French
French diminutive of Angela.
Angelique f Dutch
Dutch form of Angélique.
Antwan m African American
Variant of Antoine, in use since the 1960s.
Anushka f Indian, Hindi, Sinhalese
Meaning uncertain, possibly inspired by the Russian name Annushka.
Aphrodite f Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Phoenician origin. Aphrodite was the Greek goddess of love and beauty, identified with the Roman goddess Venus. She was the wife of Hephaestus and the mother of Eros, and she was often associated with the myrtle tree and doves. The Greeks connected her name with ἀφρός (aphros) meaning "foam", resulting in the story that she was born from the foam of the sea. Many of her characteristics are based on the goddess known as Ashtoreth to the Phoenicians and Ishtar to the Mesopotamian Semitic peoples, and on the Sumerian goddess Inanna.
Apolline f French
French form of Apollonia.
Arianwen f Welsh
Derived from Welsh arian "silver" and gwen "white, blessed". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint, one of the supposed daughters of Brychan Brycheiniog.
Armin m German
Modern form of Arminius.
Asha 1 f Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Derived from Sanskrit आशा (asha) meaning "wish, desire, hope".
Astor m English (Rare)
From a German and French surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk". The wealthy and influential Astor family, prominent in British and American society, originated in the Italian Alps.
Barbie f English
Diminutive of Barbara. This is the name of a doll produced by the Mattel toy company since 1959. It was named after the original designer's daughter.
Berardo m Italian
Italian form of Berard.
Berny m & f English
Variant of Bernie.
Beulah f Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Means "married" in Hebrew. The name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the land of Israel (Isaiah 62:4). As an English given name, Beulah has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
Bobbi f English
Diminutive of Roberta or Barbara.
Boris m Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, German, French
From a Bulgar Turkic name, also recorded as Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his realm to Christianity and is thus regarded as a saint in the Orthodox Church. To the north in Kievan Rus it was the name of another saint, a son of Vladimir the Great who was murdered with his brother Gleb in the 11th century. His mother may have been Bulgarian.... [more]
Brannon m English
From an Irish surname, a variant of Brennan.
Brennan m English
From an Irish surname (Anglicized from Irish Gaelic Ó Braonáin) that was derived from the byname Braonán, itself from Irish braon meaning "rain, moisture, drop" combined with a diminutive suffix. As a given name, it has been used since the 1960s as an alternative to Brendan or Brandon, though it has not been as popular as them.
Brian m English, Irish, Old Irish
Meaning uncertain, possibly related to the old Celtic root *brixs "hill, high" (Old Irish brií) or the related *brigā "might, power" (Old Irish briíg). It was borne by the Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. This name was common in Ireland after his time, and it was introduced to northern England by Norse-Gael settlers. It was also used in Brittany, and was brought to England by Bretons in the wake of the Norman Conquest. Though it eventually became rare in the English-speaking world, it was strongly revived in the 20th century, becoming a top-ten name for boys in most regions.
Bruna f Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Feminine form of Bruno.
Calvin m English
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve meaning "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.... [more]
Camillus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen, which is probably of Etruscan origin and unknown meaning. It is probably not related to Latin camillus "a youth employed in religious services". This name was borne by the 16th-century Italian monk Saint Camillus de Lellis.
Capucine f French
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
Carwyn m Welsh
Derived from Welsh caru "to love" and gwyn "white, blessed". This name was created in the 20th century.
Cassidy f & m English (Modern)
From an Irish surname (Anglicized from Irish Gaelic Ó Caiside), which is derived from the byname Caiside. Very rare as a given name before the 1970s, it established itself in the 80s and then surged in popularity during the 90s.
Catalina f Spanish, Corsican
Spanish and Corsican form of Katherine.
Charlotte f French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of Charles. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette. A famous fictional bearer is the spider in the children's novel Charlotte's Web (1952) by E. B. White.... [more]
Cherry f English
Simply means "cherry" from the name of the fruit. It can also be a diminutive of Charity. It has been in use since the late 19th century.
Chloe f English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "green shoot" in Greek, referring to new plant growth in the spring. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Demeter. The name is also mentioned by Paul in one of his epistles in the New Testament.... [more]
Codie m & f English (Modern)
Variant or feminine form of Cody.
Curtis m English
From an English surname that originally meant "courteous" in Old French.
Danny m English, Dutch
Diminutive of Daniel.
Darla f English
Variant of Darlene using the suffix la.
Davida f English (Rare)
Feminine form of David.
Deana f English
Variant of Deanna.
Debora f Italian, Dutch, German (Rare)
Italian, Dutch and German form of Deborah.
Deloris f English
Variant of Dolores.
Demetrius m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Δημήτριος (Demetrios), which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess Demeter 1. Kings of Macedon and the Seleucid kingdom have had this name. This was also the name of several early saints including a Saint Demetrius who was martyred in the 4th century.
Desiree f English
English form of Désirée. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the movie Désirée (1954).
Ebony f African American
From the English word ebony for the black wood that comes from the ebony tree. It is ultimately from the Egyptian word hbnj. In America this name is most often used in the black community.
Elysia f Various
From Elysium, the name of the realm of the dead in Greek and Roman mythology, which means "blissful".
Ennio m Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Ennius, which is of unknown meaning. Quintus Ennius was an early Roman poet.
Étienne m French
French form of Stephen.
Everett m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Everard.
Fathimath f Dhivehi
Dhivehi form of Fatimah.
Fawn f English
From the English word fawn for a young deer.
Fedde m Frisian
Originally a short form of names beginning with the Old German element fridu "peace".
Felix m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
Flavienne f French (Rare)
French feminine form of Flavian.
Frankie m & f English
Diminutive of Frank or Frances.
Freida f English
Variant of Frieda.
Haidee f Literature
Perhaps intended to derive from Greek αἰδοῖος (aidoios) meaning "modest, reverent". This name was created by Lord Byron for a character (written as Haidée) in his 1819 poem Don Juan.
Herbert m English, German, Dutch, Czech, Swedish, French
Derived from the Old German elements heri "army" and beraht "bright". It was borne by two Merovingian Frankish kings, usually called Charibert. The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
Herbie m English
Diminutive of Herbert.
Ilene f English
Variant of Eileen, probably inspired by the spelling of Irene.
Innocent m History (Ecclesiastical), English (African)
From the Late Latin name Innocentius, which was derived from innocens "innocent". This was the name of several early saints. It was also borne by 13 popes including Innocent III, a politically powerful ruler and organizer of the Fourth Crusade.... [more]
Janae f English (Modern)
Elaborated form of Jane.
Jayne f English
Variant of Jane.
Jenelle f English
Combination of Jen and the popular name suffix elle.
Jerold m English
Variant of Gerald.
Jerrold m English
Variant of Gerald.
Ji-Hoon m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 지훈 (see Ji-Hun).
Jocelyne f French
French feminine form of Joscelin (see Jocelyn).
Joi f English (Modern)
Variant of Joy.
Joyce f & m English
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also became a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
Judi f English
Diminutive of Judith.
Karolyn f English
Variant of Caroline.
Kathi f English
Diminutive of Katherine.
Ken 1 m English
Short form of Kenneth.
Kendrick m English
From a surname that has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of Henry".... [more]
Khaled m Arabic, Urdu
Alternate transcription of Arabic/Urdu خالد (see Khalid).
Kourtney f English (Modern)
Variant of Courtney. Like Courtney this name declined in popularity in the 1990s, but it was briefly revived after 2007 by the television personality Kourtney Kardashian (1979-) when she began appearing on the reality show Keeping Up with the Kardashians.
LaShawn f & m African American
Combination of the popular prefix la with the name Shawn.
Laurita f Spanish
Diminutive of Laura.
Liddy f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth or Lydia.
Lilibet f English
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Lorna f English
Created by the author R. D. Blackmore for the title character in his novel Lorna Doone (1869), set in southern England, which describes the dangerous love between John Ridd and Lorna Doone. Blackmore may have based the name on the Scottish place name Lorne or on the title Marquis of Lorne (see Lorne).
Lukas m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Lithuanian
German, Scandinavian, Dutch and Lithuanian form of Lucas (see Luke). This was the most popular name for boys in Germany, Austria and Lithuania in some years of the 1990s and 2000s.
Lupita f Spanish
Diminutive of Guadalupe.
Mabelle f English
Variant of Mabel. It also coincides with the French phrase ma belle meaning "my beautiful".
Malinda f English
Variant of Melinda.
Marci f English
Diminutive of Marcia.
Marie-Claire f French
Combination of Marie and Claire.
Mariel f English
Diminutive of Mary influenced by Muriel. In the case of actress Mariel Hemingway (1961-), the name is from the Cuban town of Mariel.
Markus m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German, Scandinavian, Finnish and Estonian form of Marcus (see Mark).
Marlyn f & m English
Variant of Marilyn (feminine) or Marlin (masculine).
Martie m & f English
Diminutive of Martin, Martina or Martha.
Martijn m Dutch
Dutch form of Martin.
Maryanne f English
Combination of Mary and Anne 1.
Matthias m German, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Greek Ματθίας (Matthias), a variant of Ματθαῖος (see Matthew). This form appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary (spelled Mátyás in Hungarian), including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
Melia f Greek Mythology
Means "ash tree" in Greek, a derivative of μέλι (meli) meaning "honey". This was the name of a nymph in Greek myth, the daughter of the Greek god Okeanos.
Merrill m English
From an English surname that was derived either from the given name Muriel or from place names meaning "pleasant hill".
Mervyn m Welsh, English
Welsh variant of Merfyn, as well as the usual Anglicized form.
Michiel m Dutch
Dutch form of Michael.
Mindy f English
Diminutive of Melinda.
Mohammed m Arabic, Bengali
Alternate transcription of Arabic محمّد or Bengali মুহাম্মদ (see Muhammad).
Mona 1 f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Muadhnait. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the Mona Lisa (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").
Nicky m & f English
Diminutive of Nicholas or Nicole.
Niki 2 f English
Diminutive of Nicole.
Niles m English
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Neil.
Nora 1 f English, Irish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish
Short form of Honora or Eleanor. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play A Doll's House (1879).
Olav m Norwegian, Danish
Variant of Olaf.
Olivier m French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of Oliver. This is also the French word meaning "olive tree".
Ori m & f Hebrew
Means "my light" in Hebrew.
Osborne m English
From a surname that was a variant of Osborn.
Osmond m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans. Saint Osmund was an 11th-century Norman nobleman who became an English bishop. Though it eventually became rare, it was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
Osvaldo m Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Oswald.
Ottokar m German (Rare)
German form of Odoacer.
Oz 1 m English
Short form of Oswald, Osborn and other names beginning with a similar sound.
Ozzy m English
Variant of Ozzie.
Pattie f English
Variant of Patty.
Peace f English (African)
From the English word peace, ultimately derived from Latin pax. This name is most common in Nigeria and other parts of Africa.
Peggy f English
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of Margaret. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
Pepijn m Dutch
Dutch form of Pepin.
Quintino m Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of Quintinus (see Quentin).
Rafael m Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovene, Hebrew
Form of Raphael in various languages. A famous bearer is the Spanish tennis player Rafael Nadal (1986-).
Raffaella f Italian
Italian feminine form of Raphael.
Raphaela f German
Feminine form of Raphael.
Reinaldo m Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of Reynold.
Rolande f French
French feminine form of Roland.
Roly m English
Diminutive of Roland.
Ronald m Scottish, English, Dutch, German
Scottish form of Ragnvaldr, a name introduced to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004). It is also associated with Ronald McDonald, the clown mascot for the McDonald's chain of restaurants, first appearing in 1963.
Rosaline f English
Medieval variant of Rosalind. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost (1594) and Romeo and Juliet (1596).
Roselyn f English
Variant of Rosalyn.
Royston m English (British)
From a surname that was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "town of Royse". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of Rose.
Rozanne f English
Variant of Rosanne.
Ryland m English (Modern)
From an English surname, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.
Sami 2 m Arabic, Turkish, Albanian
Means "elevated, sublime, supreme" in Arabic.
Sandy m & f English
Originally a diminutive of Alexander. As a feminine name it is a diminutive of Alexandra or Sandra. It can also be given in reference to the colour.
Savitri f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "relating to the sun" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a hymn dedicated to Savitr, a Hindu sun god, and it is also the name of his daughter. It is borne by several other characters in Hindu epics, including a wife of Brahma, a wife of Shiva, and a daughter of Daksha. In the Hindu epic the Mahabharata it is borne by King Satyavan's wife, who successfully pleas with Yama, the god of death, to restore her husband to life.
Sharla f English
Variant of Charla.
Sheridan m & f English
From an Irish surname (Anglicized from Irish Gaelic Ó Sirideáin), which was derived from the given name Sirideán possibly meaning "searcher".
Shonda f English
Invented name, probably based on the sounds found in Shawna and Rhonda.
Simonne f French
Variant of Simone 1.
Singh m Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion". In 1699 Guru Gobind Singh gave all his male Sikh followers the surname Singh, and it is now a very common surname or a middle name. The female equivalent is Kaur.
Sonny m English
From a nickname that is commonly used to denote a young boy, derived from the English word son.
Stephanie f English, German
Feminine form of Stephen.
Tamela f English
Probably a blend of Tamara and Pamela. It first arose in the 1950s.
Tate m English
From an English surname that was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.
Terri f English
Either a feminine variant of Terry 1 or a diminutive of Theresa.
Tevin m English (Modern)
Invented name, probably inspired by Kevin and Devin. This name was popularized by the American singer Tevin Campbell (1976-).
Tiger m English (Rare)
From the name of the large striped cat, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek τίγρις (tigris), ultimately of Iranian origin. A famous bearer is American golfer Tiger Woods (1975-).
Tijs m Dutch
Variant of Thijs.
Timmy m English
Diminutive of Timothy.
Tye m English
From a surname meaning "pasture" in Middle English.
Velvet f English
From the English word for the soft fabric. It became used as a given name after the main character in Enid Bagnold's book National Velvet (1935) and the movie (1944) and television (1960) adaptations.
Viggo m Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Short form of names containing the Old Norse element víg "war".
Wesley m English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name, itself meaning "west meadow" from Old English west "west" and leah "woodland, clearing". It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
Zakiya f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic زكيّة (see Zakiyya).
Zoila f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Zoilus.