Names Categorized "authors"

This is a list of names in which the categories include authors.
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ADA   f   English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish
Short form of ADELAIDE and other names beginning with the same sound. This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
AGATHA   f   English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αγαθη (Agathe), derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
AKIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AKIRA   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name.
ALDOUS   m   English (Rare)
Probably a diminutive of names beginning with the Old English element eald "old". It has been in use as an English given name since the Middle Ages, mainly in East Anglia. The British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was a famous bearer of this name.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALLEN   m   English, Scottish
Variant of ALAN. A famous bearer of this name was Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997), an American beat poet. Another is the American film director and actor Woody Allen (1935-), who took the stage name Allen from his real first name.
AMADEUS   m   Late Roman
Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.
AMY   f   English
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
ANDREA (2)   f   English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANYA   f   Russian
Russian diminutive of ANNA.
AOI   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese (aoi) meaning "hollyhock, althea" or an adjectival form of (ao) meaning "green, blue". Other kanji with the same reading can form this name as well.
APHRA   f   Various
Meaning uncertain; possibly a variant of AFRA (1), or possibly a variant of Aphrah, a biblical place name meaning "dust". This name was born by the English writer Aphra Behn (1640-1689).
ARTEMIDOROS   m   Ancient Greek
Means "gift of Artemis" from the name of the goddess ARTEMIS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of a Greek author of the 2nd century who wrote about the interpretation of dreams.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
ASTRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
ATSUKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (atsu) meaning "warm", (atsu) meaning "deep, true, sincere" or (atsu) meaning "honest" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
AUSTEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AUSTIN.
AVI   m   Hebrew
Means "my father" in Hebrew. It is also a diminutive of AVRAHAM or AVIRAM.
AYA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design", or other kanji characters with the same pronunciation.
AYLİN   f   Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "moon halo" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.
BEATRIX   f   German, Hungarian, Dutch, English (Rare), Late Roman
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.... [more]
BYRON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of 'Don Juan' and many other works.
CHARLES   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHIHIRO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand" and (hiro) meaning "search, seek", as well as other kanji combinations.
CHIYO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand" combined with (yo) meaning "generation" or (yo) meaning "world". Other kanji combinations are possible.
CHRISTIAN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.
CHRISTOPHER   m   English
From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing CHRIST", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.... [more]
CICERO   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "chickpea" from Latin cicer. Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero) was a statesman, orator and author of the 1st century BC.
CLIVE   m   English
From a surname meaning "cliff" in Old English, originally belonging to a person who lived near a cliff.
COLETTE   f   French
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).
CONAN   m   Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Gaelic "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was the author who wrote the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
CONRAD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CORMAC   m   Irish
Possibly derived from Irish Gaelic corb "raven" or "wheel" and mac "son". This was the name of a 3rd-century king of Ireland.
DALTON   m   English
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was John Dalton (1766-1844), the English chemist and physicist who theorized about the existence of atoms.
DANA (2)   m & f   English
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who was Danish. It was originally given in honour of American lawyer Richard Henry Dana (1815-1882), the author of 'Two Years Before the Mast'.
DASHIELL   m   English (Rare)
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961), it is an Anglicized form of his mother's surname De Chiel, which is of unknown meaning.
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DEFOREST   m   English
From a French surname meaning "from the forest". It was originally given in honour of American author John Deforest (1826-1906).
DELPHINE   f   French
French form of DELPHINA.
DORIS   f   English, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-).
DOYLE   m   Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dubhghaill meaning "descendant of Dubhghall" (see DOUGAL). Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
ÉMILE   m   French
French form of Aemilius (see EMIL). This name was borne by French author Émile Zola (1840-1902).
EMILY   f   English
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.... [more]
EUDORA   f   Greek Mythology
Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements ευ (eu) "good" and δωρον (doron) "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.
FARLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "fern clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of this name is Canadian author Farley Mowat (1921-).
FLANNERY   f & m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour". A famous bearer was American author Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964).
FRANÇOIS   m   French
French form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). François Villon was a French lyric poet of the 15th century. This was also the name of two kings of France.
FREDERICK   m   English
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.... [more]
GEORGE   m   English, Romanian
From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.... [more]
GERARD   m   English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GOROU   m   Japanese
From Japanese (go) meaning "five" and (rou) meaning "son". This was traditionally a name for the fifth son. Different combinations of kanji are also possible.
HANS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian short form of JOHANNES. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a Renaissance portrait painter from Germany, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HARRIET   f   English
English form of HENRIETTE, and thus a feminine form of HARRY. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century. A famous bearer was Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), the American author who wrote 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'.
HARSHA   m   Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Sanskrit
Means "happiness" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 7th-century emperor of northern India. He was also noted as an author.
HARUKI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "living". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HELEN   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HENRY   m   English
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".... [more]
HIKARU   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (hikaru) meaning "light" or (hikaru) meaning "brightness". Other kanji can also form this name.
HIROKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiro) meaning "abundant" or (hiro) meaning "prosperous" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HIROSHI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (hiroshi) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiroshi) meaning "prosperous", or other kanji and kanji combinations which are read the same way.
HITOMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (hitomi) meaning "pupil of the eye". It can also come from (hito) meaning "history" and (mi) meaning "beautiful", as well as other kanji combinations. This name is often written ひとみ using the hiragana writing system.
HOTARU   f   Japanese
From Japanese (hotaru) meaning "firefly".
HOWARD   m   English
From an English surname which can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
IAN   m   Scottish, English
Scottish form of JOHN.
ICHIROU   m   Japanese
From Japanese (ichi) meaning "one" and (rou) meaning "son". This was traditionally a name given to the first son. Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.
IVAN   m   Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
JACK   m   English
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).
JACKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of JACK or JACQUELINE. A notable bearer was baseball player Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball.
JACOB   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".... [more]
JACQUELINE   f   French, English
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.
JESSICA   f   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JOANNA   f   English, Polish, Biblical
English and Polish form of Latin Iohanna, which was derived from Greek Ιωαννα (Ioanna), the feminine form of Ioannes (see JOHN). This is the spelling used in the English New Testament, where it belongs to a follower of Jesus who is regarded as a saint. In the Middle Ages in England it was used as a Latinized form of Joan (the usual feminine form of John) and it became common as a given name in the 19th century.
JOANNE   f   English, French
Variant of JOAN (1) or JOHANNE.
JOHN   m   English, Biblical
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.... [more]
JORDANES   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, probably related to the Norse element jord meaning "land". This name was borne by a 6th-century Roman author of Gothic background, who wrote a history of the Goths. It is possible that the spelling of his name was influenced by that of the Jordan River.
JOY   f   English
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
JUN (1)   m & f   Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (jūn) meaning "king, ruler", (jùn) meaning "talented, handsome" (which is usually only masculine) or (jūn) meaning "army" (also usually only masculine). This is also a single-character Korean name, often from the hanja meaning "talented, handsome". This name can be formed by other characters besides those shown here.
JUNKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (jun) meaning "obedience" or (jun) meaning "pure" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.
KAORI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (kaori) meaning "fragrance". It can also come from an alternate reading of (ka) combined with (ori) meaning "weaving". Other kanji combinations are possible. It is often written かおり using the hiragana writing system.
KAORU   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese (kaoru) meaning "fragrant", as well as other kanji having the same reading.
KAZUKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (kazu) meaning "one" or (kazu) meaning "harmony, peace" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can also be formed from other kanji combinations.
KAZUO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (kazu) meaning "one" or (kazu) meaning "harmony, peace" combined with (o) meaning "male, man" or (o) meaning "husband, man". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
KEIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (kei) meaning "celebrate", (kei) meaning "respect", (kei) meaning "open, begin" or (kei) meaning "favour, benefit" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
KEN (2)   m   Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
KEN'ICHI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or (ken) meaning "study, sharpen" combined with (ichi) meaning "one". Other kanji combinations are possible.
KENJI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "study, sharpen" and (ji) meaning "two", as well as other combinations of kanji characters.
KENNETH   m   Scottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.
KIYOKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (kiyo) meaning "clear, pure, clean" or (kiyo) meaning "holy" and (ko) meaning "child". This name can also be formed from other combinations of kanji characters.
KNUT   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Derived from Old Norse knútr meaning "knot". Knut was a Danish prince who defeated Æðelræd II, king of England, in the early 11th century and became the ruler of Denmark, Norway and England.
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LEO   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEV (1)   m   Russian
Means "lion" in Russian, functioning as a vernacular form of Leo. This was the real Russian name of both author Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) and revolutionary Leon Trotsky (1879-1940).
LEWIS   m   English
Medieval English form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. This was also the surname of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963), the author of the 'Chronicles of Narnia'.
LOUIS   m   French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LOUISA   f   English, German, Dutch
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of 'Little Women'.
LUDOVIC   m   French
Medieval Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of an 1833 opera by the French composer Fromental Halévy.
LYDIA   f   English, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
MAKOTO   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (makoto) meaning "sincerity", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations.
MARCEL   m   French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Form of MARCELLUS. A notable bearer was the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922).
MARCUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was probably derived from the name of the Roman god MARS. This was among the most popular of the Roman praenomina. Famous bearers include Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.
MARGARET   f   English
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.... [more]
MARIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine", (ri) meaning "village" and (ko) meaning "child". Many different combinations of kanji characters can form this name.
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MARY   f   English, Biblical
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".... [more]
MASAMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (masa) meaning "become" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". This name can also be comprised of different combinations of kanji.
MASARU   m   Japanese
From Japanese (masaru) meaning "victory". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
MAURICE   m   English, French
From the Roman name Mauritius, a derivative of MAURUS. Saint Maurice was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Egypt. He and the other Christians in his legion were supposedly massacred on the orders of emperor Maximian for refusing to worship Roman gods. Thus, he is the patron saint of infantry soldiers.... [more]
MAYU   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" or (ma) meaning "full" combined with (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yu) meaning "evening". This name can also be constructed from other kanji combinations.
MEREDITH   m & f   Welsh, English
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MICHEL   m   French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MICHIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" and (ko) meaning "child". This name can also be comprised of other combinations of kanji.
MIDORI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (midori) meaning "green", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations which have the same pronunciation.
MINAKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (na), a phonetic character, and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MINORU   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (minoru) meaning "to bear fruit", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations with the same pronunciation.
MOMOKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (momo) meaning "hundred" or (momo) meaning "peach" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be constructed from other kanji combinations as well.
NAOKI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (nao) meaning "straight" and (ki) meaning "tree", as well as other combinations of different kanji with the same pronunciations.
NATHANIEL   m   English, Biblical
Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.
NEIL   m   Irish, Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.... [more]
NOBUYUKI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (nobu) meaning "trust" or (nobu) meaning "extend, stretch, open" combined with (yuki) meaning "row, line" or (yuki) meaning "happiness". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.
OCTAVIA   f   English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
OSAMU   m   Japanese
From Japanese (osamu) meaning "discipline, study", as well as other kanji which have the same pronunciation.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
PETRONIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which is possibly derived from Latin petro, petronis "yokel".
PHILIP   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Greek name Φιλιππος (Philippos) which means "friend of horses", composed of the elements φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.... [more]
RAMÓN   m   Spanish
Spanish form of RAYMOND.
RAYMOND   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Raginmund, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and mund "protector". The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Reimund. It was borne by several medieval (mostly Spanish) saints, including Saint Raymond Nonnatus, the patron of midwives and expectant mothers, and Saint Raymond of Peñafort, the patron of canonists.
ROALD   m   Norwegian
Modern form of the Old Norse name Hróðvaldr or Hróaldr, composed of the elements hróðr "fame" and valdr "ruler". This name was borne by the children's author Roald Dahl (1916-1990).
ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
RYOU   m   Japanese
From Japanese (ryou) meaning "cool, refreshing", (ryou) meaning "distant" or (ryou) meaning "reality", as well as other kanji which have the same pronunciation.
RYUU   m   Japanese
From Japanese 竜, 龍 (ryuu) meaning "dragon", as well as other kanji with the same pronunciation.
RYUUNOSUKE   m   Japanese
From Japanese 竜, 龍 (ryuu) meaning "dragon" or (ryuu) meaning "noble, prosperous" combined with (no), a possessive marker, and (suke) meaning "forerunner, herald". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
SAKURAKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
SAMUEL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.... [more]
SAYAKA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "sand" or (sa) meaning "thread, silk" with (ya) meaning "also" or (ya), an interjection, combined with (ka) meaning "fragrance" or (ka) meaning "increase". This name can also be composed of other kanji combinations. It is often written さやか using the hiragana writing system.
SHELLEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "clearing on a bank" in Old English. Two famous bearers of the surname were Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), a romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias', and Mary Shelley (1797-1851), his wife, the author of the horror story 'Frankenstein'. As a feminine given name, it came into general use after the 1940s.
SHIRLEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel 'Shirley' (1849). The child actress Shirley Temple (1928-2014) helped to popularize this name.
SHUN (2)   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese 駿 (shun) meaning "fast", (shun) meaning "talented", or other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
SIGRID   f   Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
STEPHEN   m   English, Biblical
From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown", more precisely "that which surrounds". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament. He is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.... [more]
SUSUMU   m   Japanese
From Japanese (susumu) meaning "advance, make progress", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations having the same pronunciation.
TAKASHI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (takashi) meaning "filial piety", (takashi) meaning "noble, prosperous" or (takashi) meaning "esteem, honour, venerate", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations which result in the same pronunciation.
TAKESHI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (takeshi) meaning "military, martial" or other kanji having the same reading.
TAKUMA   m   Japanese
From Japanese (taku) meaning "expand, open, support" and (ma) meaning "real, genuine". Other kanji combinations are possible.
TANYA   f   Russian, English
Russian diminutive of TATIANA. It began to be used in the English-speaking world during the 1930s.
TERENCE   m   English
From the Roman family name Terentius which is of unknown meaning. Famous bearers include Publius Terentius Afer, a Roman playwright, and Marcus Terentius Varro, a Roman scholar. It was also borne by several early saints. The name was used in Ireland as an Anglicized form of TOIRDHEALBHACH, but it was not in use as an English name until the late 19th century.
TERRY (2)   m & f   English
Diminutive of TERENCE or THERESA. A famous bearer was Terry Fox (1958-1981), a young man with an artificial leg who attempted to run across Canada to raise money for cancer research. He died of the disease before crossing the country.
TOM (1)   m   English, Dutch
Short form of THOMAS. Tom Sawyer was the main character in several of Mark Twain's novels, first appearing in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876). Other famous bearers include American actors Tom Hanks (1956-) and Tom Cruise (1962-).
TOMOKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (tomo) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (tomo) meaning "friend" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be formed of other kanji characters as well.
TRAVERS   m   English (Rare)
From the surname TRAVERS.
TULLIO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Tullius, which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer was Marcus Tullius Cicero, a Roman orator and author.
UME   f   Japanese
From Japanese (ume) meaning "plum". In Japan the plum blossom is thought to symbolize devotion. Different kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
UPTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "upper town" in Old English. A famous bearer of this name was the American novelist Upton Sinclair (1878-1968).
VÁCLAV   m   Czech, Slovak
Contracted form of the older name Veceslav, from the Slavic elements veche "more" and slava "glory". Saint Václav (known as Wenceslas in English) was a 10th-century duke of Bohemia murdered by his brother. He is the patron saint of the Czech Republic. This was also the name of several Bohemian kings.
VERNER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of WERNER.
VICTOR   m   English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
WASHINGTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town, itself meaning "settlement belonging to WASSA's people". The given name is usually given in honour of George Washington (1732-1799), commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and the first president of the United States.
WILHELM   m   German, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of WILLIAM. This was the name of two German Emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
WILLIAM   m   English
From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.... [more]
WYSTAN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
YOKO   f   Japanese
Variant transcription of YOUKO.
YUMI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (yumi) meaning "archery bow". It can also come from (yu) meaning "reason, cause", (yu) meaning "friend" or a nanori reading of (yu) meaning "archery bow" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji or kanji combinations are also possible.
YUMIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (yumi) meaning "archery bow" or (yu) meaning "reason, cause" with (mi) meaning "beautiful" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
YUU   m & f   Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness", (yuu) meaning "distant, leisurely", (yuu) meaning "brave", or other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
YUUMA   m   Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "distant, leisurely" or (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" combined with (ma) meaning "real, genuine". Other combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
YUUTO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yuu) meaning "distant, leisurely" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, (to) meaning "person" or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations are possible.
ZANE (1)   m   English
From an English surname of unknown meaning. It was introduced as a given name by American author Zane Grey (1872-1939). Zane was in fact his middle name - it had been his mother's maiden name.
ZOLA (1)   f   English
Meaning unknown, perhaps an invented name. It has been in occasional use in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. It coincides with an Italian surname, a famous bearer being the French-Italian author Émile Zola (1840-1902).
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