Russian Names

Russian names are used in the country of Russia and in Russian-speaking communities throughout the world. See also about Russian names.
gender
usage
Liudmila Людмила f Belarusian, Russian, Ukrainian
Belarusian form of Lyudmila, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Людмила (see Lyudmila) or Ukrainian Людмила (see Lyudmyla).
Liza Лиза f English, Russian, Georgian
Short form of Elizabeth (English), Yelizaveta (Russian) or Elisabed (Georgian).
Lizaveta Лизавета f Russian
Short form of Yelizaveta.
Luba Люба f Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Ukrainian Люба (see Lyuba).
Lubov Любовь f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian Любовь or Ukrainian/Bulgarian Любов (see Lyubov).
Ludmila Людмила f Czech, Latvian, Russian
Means "favour of the people" from the Slavic elements lyudu "people" and milu "gracious, dear". Saint Ludmila was a 10th-century duchess of Bohemia, the grandmother of Saint Václav. She was murdered on the orders of her daughter-in-law Drahomíra.... [more]
Ludmilla Людмила f Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Людмила (see Lyudmila).
Luka Лука m Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic
Form of Lucas (see Luke) in several languages.
Lukyan Лукьян m Russian (Archaic), Ukrainian (Archaic)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Lucianus.
Lyosha Лёша m Russian
Diminutive of Aleksey.
Lyov Лёв m Russian (Rare)
Diminutive of Lev 1.
Lyuba Люба f Russian, Ukrainian
Diminutive of Lyubov.
Lyubochka Любочка f Russian, Ukrainian
Diminutive of Lyubov.
Lyubov Любовь f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Derived from the Slavic element lyuby meaning "love".
Lyudmila Людмила f Russian, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Russian and Bulgarian form of Ludmila. This was the name of a character in Aleksandr Pushkin's poem Ruslan and Lyudmila (1820).
Makar Макар m Russian
Russian form of Makarios (see Macario).
Makari Макарий m Russian (Archaic)
Alternate transcription of Russian Макарий (see Makariy).
Makariy Макарий m Russian (Archaic)
Russian form of Makarios (see Macario).
Maks Макс m Russian, Ukrainian
Short form of Maksim or Maksym.
Maksim Максим m Russian, Belarusian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Russian, Belarusian and Macedonian form of Maximus, as well as an alternate transcription of Ukrainian Максим (see Maksym).
Maksimilian Максимилиан, Максимильян m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Maximilianus (see Maximilian).
Manya Маня f Russian
Russian diminutive of Maria.
Marfa Марфа f Russian
Traditional Russian form of Martha.
Margarita Маргарита f Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Greek, Late Roman
Latinate form of Margaret. This is also the Spanish word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Maria Мария f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see Mary). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
Marianna Марианна f Italian, Hungarian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Greek, English
Combination of Maria and Anna. It has been confused with the Roman name Mariana to the point that it is no longer easy to separate the two forms. It is sometimes also used as a Latinized form of Mariamne.
Marina Марина f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Marinus. This name was borne by a few early saints. This is also the name by which Saint Margaret of Antioch is known in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Mariya Мария f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of Maria, as well as an alternate transcription of Belarusian Марыя (see Maryia).
Mark Марк m English, Russian, Belarusian, Dutch, Danish, Biblical
Form of Latin Marcus used in several languages. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.... [more]
Marlen 1 Марлен m Russian
Blend of Marx and Lenin. This name was created by Communist parents who were eager to reject traditional names.
Martin Мартин, Мартын m English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god Mars. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
Marusya Маруся f Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of Mariya.
Marya Марья f Russian
Russian variant form of Maria.
Maryana Марьяна f Ukrainian, Russian
Ukrainian form of Marianna, and a Russian variant.
Masha Маша f Russian
Russian diminutive of Mariya.
Matfey Матфей m Russian (Rare)
Older Russian form of Matthew.
Matrona Матрона f Russian (Rare), Late Roman
Means "lady" in Late Latin. This was the name of three early saints.
Matryona Матрёна f Russian (Rare)
Variant of Matrona.
Matvei Матвей m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Матвей (see Matvey).
Matvey Матвей m Russian
Russian form of Matthew.
Max Макс m German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Czech, Russian, Catalan
Short form of Maximilian (or sometimes of Maxwell in English). It is also an alternate transcription of Russian Макс (see Maks).
Maxim Максим m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech
Alternate transcription of Russian Максим or Belarusian Максім (see Maksim) or Ukrainian Максим (see Maksym). This is also the Czech form.
Mechislav Мечислав m Russian (Rare), Medieval Slavic
Russian form of Mieczysław.
Mefodiy Мефодий m Russian (Archaic)
Russian form of Methodius.
Melor Мэлор m Russian (Rare)
Acronym of Russian Маркс, Энгельс, Ленин, Октябрьская Революция (Marx, Engels, Lenin, October Revolution). This name commemorates the creation of the former Soviet state. It was created by Communist parents who were eager to reject traditional names.
Michail Михаил m Greek, Russian
Modern Greek transcription of Michael. It is also an alternate transcription of Russian Михаил (see Mikhail).
Mikhail Михаил m Russian, Belarusian, Bulgarian
Russian and Belarusian form of Michael, and an alternate transcription of Bulgarian Михаил (see Mihail). This was the name of two Russian tsars. Other notable bearers include the poet Mikhail Lermontov (1814-1841) and the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev (1931-).
Mila Мила f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
Milan Милан m Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
Milana Милана f Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Belarusian, Ukrainian
Feminine form of Milan.
Milena Милена f Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Slovak, Italian
Feminine form of Milan. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of the Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of Maria and Elena.
Miron 1 Мирон m Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish
Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian and Polish form of Myron.
Miroslav Мирослав m Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
Misha Миша m Russian
Russian diminutive of Mikhail.
Mishka Мишка m Russian
Russian diminutive of Mikhail.
Mitrofan Митрофан m Russian (Archaic)
Russian form of Metrophanes.
Mitya Митя m Russian
Diminutive of Dmitriy or Mitrofan.
Modest Модест m Russian (Archaic)
Russian form of Modestus.
Moisey Моисей m Russian
Russian form of Moses.
Motya Мотя m & f Russian
Diminutive of Matvey or Matrona.
Mstislav Мстислав m Czech (Rare), Russian (Rare), Medieval Slavic
Means "vengeance and glory" from the Slavic elements misti "vengeance" and slava "glory".
Nadejda Надежда f Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Надежда (see Nadezhda).
Nadezhda Надежда f Russian, Bulgarian
Means "hope" in Russian and Bulgarian.
Nadia 1 Надя f French, Italian, Spanish, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Variant of Nadya 1 used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).
Nadya 1 Надя f Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Russian and Bulgarian diminutive of Nadezhda. It is also an alternate transcription of Ukrainian Надія (see Nadiya).
Naida Наида f Russian
Meaning uncertain, possibly derived from Greek Ναϊάς (Naias), a type of water nymph in Greek mythology (plural Ναϊάδες).
Nastasia Настасья f Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Настасья (see Nastasya).
Nastasya Настасья f Russian
Short form of Anastasiya.
Nastia Настя f Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Настя (see Nastya).
Nastya Настя f Russian
Diminutive of Anastasiya.
Nata Ната f Russian, Georgian
Short form of Natalya (Russian) or Natalia (Georgian).
Natali Натали f Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Natalie.
Nataliya Наталия f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of Natalia (see Natalie).
Natalya Наталья f Russian
Russian form of Natalia (see Natalie).
Natasha Наташа f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of Natalya. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
Naum Наум m Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Russian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Nahum.
Nazar Назар m Russian, Ukrainian, Turkmen, Armenian
Russian, Ukrainian, Turkmen and Armenian form of Nazarius.
Nazariy Назарий m Ukrainian, Russian (Rare)
Ukrainian and Russian form of Nazarius.
Nelli Нелли f Russian, Finnish, Hungarian
Russian, Finnish and Hungarian form of Nellie.
Nestor Нестор m Greek Mythology, Russian
Means "returner, homecomer" in Greek, from νέομαι (neomai) meaning "to return". In Homer's Iliad this was the name of the king of Pylos, famous for his great wisdom and longevity, who acted as a counselor to the Greek allies.
Nika 1 Ника f & m Russian
Russian short form of Veronika and other names ending in nika. It can also be a short form of Nikita 1 (masculine).
Nikandr Никандр m Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Nikandros.
Nikanor Никанор m Ancient Greek, Russian (Rare)
Greek and Russian form of Nicanor.
Nikifor Никифор m Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Russian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Nikephoros.
Nikita 1 Никита m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Russian form of Niketas. This form is also used in Ukrainian and Belarusian alongside the more traditional forms Mykyta and Mikita.
Nikodim Никодим m Russian
Russian form of Nicodemus.
Nikolai Николай m Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see Nikolay).
Nikolay Николай m Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of Nicholas. A notable bearer was the Russian novelist Nikolay Gogol (1809-1852).
Nikon Никон m Ancient Greek, Russian
Derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory".
Nil Нил m & f Catalan, Russian (Rare), Turkish
Catalan and Russian form of Neilos (and the Nile River). This name was borne by a 15th-century Russian saint, Nil Sorsky. As a Turkish name it is feminine, and comes directly from the Turkish name for the river.
Nina 1 Нина f Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Lithuanian, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as Antonina or Giannina. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also nearly coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
Nina 3 Нина f Russian
Russian form of Nino 2.
Ninel Нинель f Russian
Reversal of the surname Lenin. Lenin was the founder of the former Soviet state. This name was created by Communist parents who were eager to reject traditional names.
Ninochka Ниночка f Russian
Diminutive of Nina 1.
Nonna Нонна f Russian
Russian form of Nona 2.
Noyabrina Ноябрина f Russian (Rare)
Derived from Russian ноябрь (noyabr) meaning "November". It was coined by Communist parents in order to commemorate the October Revolution of 1917, which according to the Gregorian calendar (not in use in Russia at the time) actually took place in November 1917.
Odissey Одиссей m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Odysseus.
Ofeliya Офелия f Azerbaijani, Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare), Bulgarian (Rare)
Azerbaijani, Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of Ophelia.
Oksana Оксана f Ukrainian, Russian
Ukrainian form of Xenia.
Oktyabrina Октябрина f Russian (Rare)
Derived from Russian октябрь (oktyabr) meaning "October". This name was created by Communist parents who were eager to reject traditional names and commemorate the October Revolution of 1917.
Oleg Олег m Russian
Russian form of Helge. The Varangians brought this name from Scandinavia to Russia. It was borne by an important 10th-century grand prince of Kiev.
Olesya Олеся f Ukrainian, Russian
Ukrainian diminutive of Oleksandra. This was the name of an 1898 novel by the Russian author Aleksandr Kuprin.
Olga Ольга f Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of Helga. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
Olimpiada Олимпиада f Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Olympias.
Olya Оля f Russian
Diminutive of Olga.
Onisim Онисим m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Onesimus.
Onufriy Онуфрий m Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Onuphrius.
Osip Осип m Russian
Russian form of Joseph.
Oxana Оксана f Ukrainian, Russian
Alternate transcription of Ukrainian/Russian Оксана (see Oksana).
Pafnutiy Пафнутий m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Paphnutius.
Pankrati Панкратий m Russian (Rare)
Alternate transcription of Russian Панкратий (see Pankratiy).
Pankratiy Панкратий m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Pancratius.
Panteley Пантелей m Bulgarian (Rare), Russian (Rare)
Bulgarian and Russian form of both Panteleimon and Pantaleon.
Pasha Паша m Russian
Diminutive of Pavel.
Patritsiya Патриция f Bulgarian (Rare), Russian (Rare)
Bulgarian and Russian feminine form of Patricius (see Patrick).
Patya Патя m Russian (Rare)
Diminutive of Ipatiy.
Pavel Павел m Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian, Belarusian
Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian and Belarusian form of Paul.
Pelageya Пелагея f Russian
Russian form of Pelagia.
Pelagiya Пелагия f Russian
Russian form of Pelagia.
Petia Петя m & f Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Петя (see Petya).
Petya Петя m & f Russian, Bulgarian
Russian masculine diminutive of Pyotr or Bulgarian feminine diminutive of Petar.
Platon Платон m Ancient Greek, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian
Greek form of Plato.
Polikarp Поликарп m Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Polycarp.
Polina Полина f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Greek
Either a Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Greek form of Paulina or a short form of Apollinariya.
Porfiriy Порфирий m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Porphyrios (see Porfirio).
Praskovia Прасковья f Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Прасковья (see Praskovya).
Praskoviya Прасковья f Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Прасковья (see Praskovya).
Praskovya Прасковья f Russian
Russian form of Paraskeve.
Prokhor Прохор m Russian
Russian form of Prochorus.
Prokopiy Прокопий m Russian
Russian form of Prokopios.
Prokopy Прокопий m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Прокопий (see Prokopiy).
Pyotr Пётр m Russian
Russian form of Peter. A famous bearer was the Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893).
Rada Рада f Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Derived from the Slavic element rad meaning "happy, willing".
Radimir Радимир m Russian (Rare)
Russian variant form of Radomir.
Radmir Радмир m Russian
Russian form of Radomir.
Rafail Рафаил m Greek, Russian
Greek and Russian form of Raphael.
Raisa 1 Раиса f Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Possibly from the Greek name Herais. This was the name of a saint and martyr killed in Alexandria during the early 4th-century persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian.
Raya Рая f Bulgarian, Russian
Diminutive of Rayna 1 or Raisa 1.
Renat Ренат m Russian
Russian form of Renatus. In some cases Communist parents may have bestowed it as an acronym of революция наука техника (revolyutsiya nauka tekhnika) meaning "revolution, science, technics" or революция наука труд (revolyutsiya nauka trud) meaning "revolution, science, labour".
Robert Роберт m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).... [more]
Rodion Родион m Russian
Russian form of Herodion.
Rodya Родя m Russian
Diminutive of Rodion.
Roksana Роксана f Russian, Polish
Russian and Polish form of Roxana.
Roksolana Роксолана f Ukrainian, Russian
Ukrainian and Russian form of Roxelana.
Rolan Ролан m Russian
Russian form of Roland.
Roma 1 Рома m Russian
Diminutive of Roman.
Roman Роман m Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian, German, English
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
Rostislav Ростислав m Russian, Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rasti "growth" and slava "glory".
Roza 1 Роза f Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Means "rose" in some Slavic languages. It is a cognate of Rosa 1.
Rozaliya Розалия f Russian
Russian form of Rosalia.
Rudolf Рудольф m German, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Dutch, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel The Prisoner of Zenda (1894).
Ruf Руфь f Russian
Russian form of Ruth 1.
Rufina Руфина f Russian, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Rufinus.
Rurik Рюрик m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of the Old Norse name Hrœrekr.
Ruslan Руслан m Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Turkmen, Azerbaijani, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar, Circassian, Indonesian, Malay
Form of Yeruslan used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem Ruslan and Ludmila (1820), which was loosely based on Russian and Tatar folktales of Yeruslan Lazarevich.
Rustik Рустик m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Rusticus.
Ruvim Рувим m Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Reuben.
Sabina Сабина f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "a Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
Samuil Самуил m Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of Samuel.
Sanya 2 Саня m & f Russian
Diminutive of Aleksandr or Aleksandra.
Sasha Саша m & f Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of Aleksandr or Aleksandra.
Sashenka Сашенька f Russian
Diminutive of Sasha.
Sashok Сашок m Russian
Diminutive of Aleksandr.
Saveli Савелий m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Савелий (see Saveliy).
Saveliy Савелий m Russian
Russian form of the Latin name Sabellius meaning "a Sabine". The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy.
Savely Савелий m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Савелий (see Saveliy).
Savva Савва m Russian
Russian form of Sabas.
Selena Селена f Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Selene. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.
Semen Семён m Ukrainian, Russian
Ukrainian form of Simon 1, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Семён (see Semyon).
Semion Семён m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Семён (see Semyon).
Semyon Семён m Russian
Russian form of Simon 1.
Serafim Серафим m Greek, Portuguese, Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Form of Seraphinus (see Seraphina) in various languages.
Serafima Серафима f Russian
Russian form of Seraphina.
Sergei Сергей m Russian, Bulgarian
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Сергей (see Sergey).
Sergej Сергей m Serbian, Russian, Bulgarian
Serbian form of Sergius, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Сергей (see Sergey).
Sergey Сергей m Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of Sergius.
Seva Сева m Russian
Diminutive of Vsevolod.
Sevastian Севастьян m Russian (Rare)
Alternate transcription of Russian Севастьян (see Sevastyan).
Sevastyan Севастьян m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Sebastian.
Shura Шура f & m Russian
Russian diminutive of Aleksandra or Aleksandr.
Silvestr Сильвестр m Czech, Russian (Rare)
Czech and Russian form of Silvester.
Slava Слава m & f Russian, Slovene, Croatian
Short form of Slavic names containing the element slava "glory".
Snezhana Снежана f Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Russian, Bulgarian and Macedonian cognate of Snježana.
Sofiya София f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of Sophia.
Sofron Софрон m Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Russian and Ukrainian form of Sophron.
Sofya Софья f Russian
Russian form of Sophia.
Sonya Соня f Russian, English
Russian diminutive of Sophia. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace (1869, English translation 1886).
Spartak Спартак m Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Armenian, Georgian
Form of Spartacus in several languages.
Stanislav Станислав m Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements stani meaning "stand, become" combined with slava meaning "glory".
Stanislava Станислава f Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Feminine form of Stanislav.
Stas Стас m Russian
Russian diminutive of Stanislav.
Stasya Стася f Russian
Diminutive of Stanislava or Anastasiya.
Stefaniya Стефания f Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Russian, Bulgarian and Ukrainian feminine form of Stephen.
Stepan Степан m Russian, Ukrainian, Armenian
Russian, Ukrainian and Armenian form of Stephanos (see Stephen).
Susanna Сусанна f Italian, Catalan, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
From Σουσάννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.... [more]
Sveta Света f Russian
Short form of Svetlana.
Svetka Светка f Russian
Diminutive of Svetlana.
Svetlana Светлана f Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian
Derived from Russian svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem Svetlana (1813) by the poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.
Svyatopolk Святополк m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Svatopluk.
Svyatoslav Святослав m Russian, Ukrainian
Derived from the Slavic elements svetu "blessed, holy" and slava "glory".
Syuzanna Сюзанна f Russian
Russian variant of Susanna.
Taisa Таиса f Russian, Ukrainian
Short form of Taisiya.
Taisia Таисия f Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian Таисия or Ukrainian Таїсія (see Taisiya).
Taisiya Таисия f Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Thaïs (referring to the saint).
Tamara Тамара f Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Lithuanian, Georgian
Russian form of Tamar. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).
Tamila Тамила f Ukrainian, Russian
Possibly a variant of Tomila.
Tanya Таня f Russian, Bulgarian, English
Russian diminutive of Tatiana. It began to be used in the English-speaking world during the 1930s.
Taras Тарас m Ukrainian, Russian, Belarusian
Ukrainian, Russian and Belarusian form of the Greek name Ταράσιος (Tarasios), which possibly means "from Taras". Taras was an Italian city, now called Taranto, which was founded by Greek colonists in the 8th century BC and was named for the Greek mythological figure Taras, a son of Poseidon. Saint Tarasios was an 8th-century bishop of Constantinople. It was also borne by the Ukrainian writer and artist Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
Tasha Таша f Russian, English
Short form of Natasha.
Tatiana Татьяна f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, French, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name Tatius. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
Tatyana Татьяна f Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of Tatiana.
Terenti Терентий m Georgian, Russian
Georgian form of Terentius (see Terence). It is also an alternate transcription of Russian Терентий (see Terentiy).
Terentiy Терентий m Russian
Russian form of Terentius (see Terence).
Tikhon Тихон m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Tychon.
Timofei Тимофей m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Тимофей (see Timofey).
Timofey Тимофей m Russian
Russian form of Timothy.
Timur Тимур m Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Uzbek, Turkish, Russian, History
From the Turkic and Mongol name Temür meaning "iron". This was the name of several Mongol, Turkic and Yuan leaders. A notable bearer was Timur, also known as Tamerlane (from Persian تیمور لنگ (Timur e Lang) meaning "Timur the lame"), a 14th-century Turkic leader who conquered large areas of Western Asia.
Tit Тит m Slovene, Russian (Rare)
Slovene and Russian form of Titus.
Toma 1 Тома f Russian
Diminutive of Tamara.
Tonya Тоня f English, Russian
English diminutive of Antonia or a Russian diminutive of Antonina. In the English-speaking world its use has likely been positively influenced by the name Tanya.
Trofim Трофим m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Trophimus.
Tsetsiliya Цецилия f Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Cecilia.
Tyoma Тёма m Russian
Diminutive of Artyom.
Uliana Ульяна f Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian Ульяна or Ukrainian Уляна (see Ulyana).
Ulya Уля f Russian
Diminutive of Ulyana.
Ulyana Ульяна f Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Juliana.
Ustinya Устинья f Russian (Rare)
Russian variant form of Iustina (see Justina).
Vadik Вадик m Russian
Diminutive of Vadim.
Vadim Вадим m Russian
Meaning unknown. It is used as a Russian form of Bademus, but it may actually be derived from the Slavic name Vadimir or else from an Old Norse source.
Vadimir Вадимир m Russian (Rare)
Possibly from the Slavic elements vaditi "accuse" and miru "peace, world".
Valentin Валентин m French, Romanian, German, Czech, Russian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Finnish
Form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1) in several languages.
Valentina Валентина f Italian, Russian, Lithuanian, German, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.
Valeri Валерий m Bulgarian, Georgian, Russian
Bulgarian and Georgian form of Valerius, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Валерий (see Valeriy).
Valerian Валериан m Russian, Georgian, Romanian, History
From the Roman cognomen Valerianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name Valerius. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor. Several saints also had this name, including a 2nd-century martyr of Lyons.
Valeriy Валерий m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian form of Valerius.
Valeriya Валерия f Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Russian and Ukrainian feminine form of Valerius, as well as an alternate transcription of Belarusian Валерыя (see Valeryia).
Valery Валерий m Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Alternate transcription of Russian Валерий, Ukrainian Валерій or Belarusian Валерый (see Valeriy).
Valya Валя f & m Russian, Bulgarian
Diminutive of Valentina or Valentin.
Vanya Ваня m Russian
Diminutive of Ivan.
Varfolomei Варфоломей m Russian (Rare)
Alternate transcription of Russian Варфоломей (see Varfolomey).
Varfolomey Варфоломей m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Bartholomew.
Varlaam Варлаам m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Barlaam.
Varlam Варлам m Russian (Rare)
Variant of Varlaam.
Varnava Варнава m Russian (Rare), Old Church Slavic
Russian form of Barnabas.
Varvara Варвара f Russian, Greek, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Russian, Greek, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Barbara.
Varya Варя f Russian
Diminutive of Varvara.
Vasili Василий m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see Vasiliy).
Vasilisa Василиса f Russian
Russian feminine form of Basil 1.
Vasiliy Василий m Russian
Russian form of Basil 1.
Vasily Василий m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see Vasiliy).
Vaska Васька m & f Russian, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Russian diminutive of Vasiliy (masculine) or a Macedonian and Bulgarian diminutive of Vasilija (feminine).
Vassily Василий m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see Vasiliy).
Vasya Вася m Russian
Diminutive of Vasiliy.
Vatslav Вацлав m Russian
Russian form of Václav.
Venera Венера f Sicilian, Russian, Bulgarian, Albanian
Form of Venus, from the genitive form Veneris. This name was borne by a 2nd-century saint who was martyred in Rome or Sicily.
Veniamin Вениамин m Russian, Greek
Russian and Greek form of Benjamin.
Venyamin Вениамин m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Вениамин (see Veniamin).
Vera 1 Вера f Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Belarusian, Georgian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
Verochka Верочка f Russian
Russian diminutive of Vera 1.
Verusha Веруша f Russian
Russian diminutive of Vera 1.
Verusya Веруся f Russian
Russian diminutive of Vera 1.
Vikenti Викентий m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Викентий (see Vikentiy).
Vikentiy Викентий m Russian
Russian form of Vincent.
Viktoria Виктория f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
German, Scandinavian and Greek variant of Victoria. It is also an alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Виктория or Ukrainian Вікторія (see Viktoriya) or Belarusian Вікторыя (see Viktoryia).
Viktoriia Виктория f Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian Виктория or Ukrainian Вікторія (see Viktoriya).
Viktoriya Виктория f Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian form of Victoria, as well as an alternate transcription of Belarusian Вікторыя (see Viktoryia).
Vilen Вилен m Russian
Abbreviation of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the name of the founder of the former Soviet state (see Vladimir and Lenin).
Violetta Виолетта f Italian, Russian, Hungarian
Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of Violet.
Vissarion Виссарион m Russian (Archaic), Greek
Russian form and Modern Greek transcription of Bessarion.
Vitali Виталий m Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian Виталий or Ukrainian Віталій (see Vitaliy).
Vitalik Виталик m Russian, Ukrainian
Diminutive of Vitaliy.
Vitaliy Виталий m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Vitalis (see Vitale).
Vitaliya Виталия f Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian feminine form of Vitalis (see Vitale).
Vitaly Виталий m Russian, Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Russian Виталий or Ukrainian Віталій (see Vitaliy).
Vitold Витольд m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Witold.
Vitya Витя m Russian
Diminutive of Viktor.
Vlad Влад m Romanian, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Old short form of Vladislav and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule". Vlad Dracula, a 15th-century prince of Wallachia, was Bram Stoker's inspiration for the name of his vampire, Count Dracula.
Vladik Владик m Russian
Diminutive of Vladislav.
Vladilen Владилен m Russian
Contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the name of the founder of the former Soviet state (see Vladimir and Lenin).
Vladimir Владимир m Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
Vladislav Владислав m Russian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
Vladislava Владислава f Russian, Czech
Feminine form of Vladislav.
Vladlen Владлен m Russian
Contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the name of the founder of the former Soviet state (see Vladimir and Lenin).
Vladlena Владлена f Russian
Feminine form of Vladlen.
Vlas Влас m Russian
Russian form of Blaise.
Vlasi Власий m Russian (Rare)
Alternate transcription of Russian Власий (see Vlasiy).
Vlasiy Власий m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Blaise.
Volodya Володя m Russian
Diminutive of Vladimir.
Volya Воля m Russian (Rare)
Diminutive of Vsevolod. It also means "will, freedom" in Russian.
Vova Вова m Russian
Diminutive of Vladimir.
Vsevolod Всеволод m Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements visi "all" and vladeti "rule". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev.
Vyacheslav Вячеслав m Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Václav.
Wassily Василий m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Василий (see Vasiliy).
Yakim Яким m Russian (Rare)
Russian form of Joachim.