Wordsmith's Personal Name List

ZULEIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: zoo-LAY-kə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 40 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly of Arabic origin. According to medieval tradition, notably related by the 15th-century Persian poet Jami, this was the name of the biblical Potiphar's wife. She has been a frequent subject of poems and tales.
ZOTIQUE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
French form of Zotikos via ZOTICUS. A known bearer of this name was Zotique Racicot (1845-1915), a Canadian Roman Catholic priest and Auxiliary Bishop of Montréal.
ZOSIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized), Italian
Rating: 51% based on 9 votes
Latinized form of ZOSIME and Italian feminine form of ZOSIMO.
ZORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Зора(Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ZO-ra(Czech) ZAW-ra(Slovak)
Rating: 66% based on 14 votes
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".
ZOLZAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mongolian
Other Scripts: Золзаяа(Mongolian Cyrillic)
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
Derived from Mongolian заяа (zayaa) meaning "fate, luck, destiny".
ZINOVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ζηνοβία(Greek)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Modern Greek transcription of ZENOBIA.
ZIMRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זִמְרִי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIM-rie(English)
Rating: 31% based on 33 votes
Means "my praise" or "my music" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Israel in the Old Testament. He ruled for only seven days, when he was succeeded by the commander of the army Omri.
ZILLAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: צִלָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIL-ə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 31 votes
Means "shade" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the second wife of Lamech.
ZIBIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: צִבְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 47% based on 19 votes
Means "gazelle" or "doe" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother of King Joash of Judah.
ZERELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American
Pronounced: zə-REL-də
Rating: 54% based on 12 votes
Variant of SERILDA. It was regionally popular in the Midwestern and Southern United States in the 19th century, borne by the Kentuckian mother of Jesse James, outlaw, as well as her husband's niece, whom Jesse later married. Another known bearer was American suffragist Zerelda G. Wallace (1817-1901).
ZENOBIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Ζηνοβία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZDEH-NO-BEE-A(Classical Greek) zə-NO-bee-ə(English)
Rating: 44% based on 33 votes
Means "life of Zeus", derived from Greek Ζηνός (Zenos) meaning "of ZEUS" and βίος (bios) meaning "life". This was the name of a 3rd-century queen of Palmyra. After claiming the title Queen of the East and expanding her realm into Roman territory she was defeated by Emperor Aurelian. Her Greek name was used as an approximation of her native Aramaic name.
ZENAIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Ζηναΐδα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 64% based on 12 votes
Apparently a Greek derivative of Ζηναΐς (Zenais), which was derived from the name of the Greek god ZEUS. This was the name of a 1st-century saint who was a doctor with her sister Philonella.
ZELKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: ZEHL-kah
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of GIZELLA, meaning "hostage, pledge".
ZEBULUN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זְבוּלֻן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZEHB-yə-lən(English)
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
Possibly derived from Ugartic zbl meaning "prince". In the Old Testament Zebulun is the tenth son of Jacob (his sixth son by Leah) and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Genesis 30:20 implies two different roots for the name: זָבַל (zaval) meaning "to dwell" and זֵבֵד (zeved) meaning "gift, dowry". These are probably only folk etymologies.
ZEBEDEE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Ζεβεδαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZEHB-ə-dee(English)
Rating: 34% based on 31 votes
From Ζεβεδαῖος (Zebedaios), the Greek form of ZEBADIAH used in the New Testament, where it refers to the father of the apostles James and John.
ZACCAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זַכָּי(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 46% based on 8 votes
From the Hebrew name זַכָּי (Zakkai) meaning "pure". This is the name of a minor character in the Old Testament.
YVO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Rating: 38% based on 20 votes
Variant of IVO (1).
YSELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Occitan
Rating: 61% based on 7 votes
Possibly a variant of ISOLDE.
YOLANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: YAW-LAHND
Rating: 57% based on 22 votes
French form of YOLANDA. A notable bearer of the 15th century was Yolande of Aragon, who acted as regent for the French king Charles VII, her son-in-law. She was a supporter of Joan of Arc.
YLVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Rating: 58% based on 18 votes
Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".
XENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξένια(Greek) Ξενία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 64% based on 13 votes
Means "hospitality" in Greek, a derivative of ξένος (xenos) meaning "foreigner, guest". This was the name of a 5th-century saint who is venerated in the Eastern Church.
XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KSAN-TEH(Classical Greek)
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
Derived from Greek ξανθός (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
WYSTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 37% based on 11 votes
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman Conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
WULFRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Rating: 69% based on 8 votes
Old English form of ULRIC.
WULFHELM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Derived from Gothic vulfs "wolf" combined with Old High German helm "helmet, protection."
WOLFRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: VAWL-fram
Rating: 49% based on 39 votes
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn meaning "raven".
WOLFGANG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VAWLF-gang(German) WUWLF-gang(English)
Rating: 52% based on 11 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang meaning "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
WOJCIECH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: VOI-chekh
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements voji "warrior, soldier" and tekha "solace, comfort, joy". Saint Wojciech (also known by the Czech form of his name Vojtěch or his adopted name Adalbert) was a Bohemian missionary to Hungary, Poland and Prussia, where he was martyred in the 10th century.
WISTERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIS-tee- ree-a
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Derived from the name of the flower, which in turn was named after the American anatomist Caspar Wistar. His last name allegedly derives from German Westländer "westerner".
WINIFRED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: WIN-ə-frid(English)
Rating: 66% based on 54 votes
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.
WILHELMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German (Rare), English
Pronounced: vil-hehl-MEE-na(Dutch, German) wil-ə-MEEN-ə(English) wil-hehl-MEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 13 votes
Dutch and German feminine form of WILHELM. This name was borne by a queen of the Netherlands (1880-1962).
WILFRID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-frəd
Rating: 41% based on 13 votes
Variant of WILFRED.
WILBUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-bər
Rating: 42% based on 35 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane. Wright was named after the Methodist minister Wilbur Fisk (1792-1839).
WHITAKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIT-ə-kər
Rating: 51% based on 8 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "white field" in Old English.
WALDO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: WAWL-do(English)
Rating: 30% based on 37 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element wald meaning "rule". In the Middle Ages this name became the basis for a surname. Its present use in the English-speaking world is usually in honour of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism [2]. He was (probably) named after the 12th-century Christian radical Peter Waldo, who was from Lyons in France. Though Waldo and his followers, called the Waldensians, were declared heretics at the time, they were later admired by Protestants.
VIVIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: VIV-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 51% based on 17 votes
From the Latin name Vivianus, which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
VIVECA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, English
Pronounced: VEE-veh-kah(Swedish) VIV-i-kə(English)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Variant of VIVEKA.
VISSARION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Archaic), Greek
Other Scripts: Виссарион(Russian) Βησσαρίων(Greek)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Russian form and Modern Greek transcription of BESSARION.
VIRGINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Greek, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Βιργινία(Greek)
Pronounced: vər-JIN-yə(English) veer-JEE-nya(Italian) beer-KHEE-nya(Spanish)
Rating: 59% based on 48 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius, which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.

This was the name of the first English baby born in the New World: Virginia Dare in 1587 on Roanoke Island. Perhaps because of this, the name has generally been more popular in America than elsewhere in the English-speaking world, though in both Britain and America it was not often used until the 19th century. The baby was named after the Colony of Virginia, which was itself named for Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen. A more recent bearer was the English novelist Virginia Woolf (1882-1941).

VIOLETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Hungarian
Other Scripts: Виолетта(Russian)
Pronounced: vyo-LEHT-ta(Italian) vyi-u-LYEHT-tə(Russian) VEE-o-leht-taw(Hungarian)
Rating: 66% based on 49 votes
Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of VIOLET.
VIOLANTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Italian
Pronounced: vee-o-LAN-teh(Italian)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Latin form of YOLANDA.
VERENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Late Roman
Pronounced: veh-REH-na(German)
Rating: 59% based on 43 votes
Possibly related to Latin verus "true". This might also be a Coptic form of the Ptolemaic name BERENICE. Saint Verena was a 3rd-century Egyptian-born nurse who went with the Theban Legion to Switzerland. After the legion was massacred she settled near Zurich.
VENETIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Greek
Other Scripts: Βενετία(Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 14 votes
Originally this was probably a Latinized form of GWYNEDD or GWYNETH. It also coincides with the Latin name of the city of Venice in Italy. This name was borne by the celebrated beauty Venetia Stanley (1600-1633). Benjamin Disraeli used it in his novel entitled Venetia (1837).

As a Greek name it is derived directly from the name of the city.

VASHTI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: וַשְׁתִּי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: VASH-tee(English)
Rating: 52% based on 21 votes
Possibly means "thread" in Hebrew, but it is most likely of Persian origin. In the Old Testament this is the name of the first wife of King Ahasuerus of Persia before he marries Esther.
VARINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish (Rare)
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of VARINIUS.
VALENTINE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAL-in-tien
Rating: 58% based on 41 votes
From the Roman cognomen Valentinus, which was itself a derivative of the cognomen Valens meaning "strong, vigorous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.
URSULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Pronounced: UR-sə-lə(English) UR-syoo-lə(English) UWR-zoo-la(German) OOR-soo-lah(Finnish)
Rating: 57% based on 49 votes
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
ÚNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: OO-nə
Rating: 54% based on 26 votes
Possibly derived from Irish uan meaning "lamb".
ULYSSES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology, English
Pronounced: yoo-LIS-eez(American English) YOOL-i-seez(British English)
Rating: 47% based on 43 votes
Latin form of ODYSSEUS. It was borne by Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War, who went on to become an American president. Irish author James Joyce used it as the title of his book Ulysses (1922), which loosely parallels Homer's epic the Odyssey.
ULYANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Ульяна(Russian) Уляна(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: uw-LYA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of JULIANA.
ULVHILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Scandinavian
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Composed of the elements ulv ("wolf") and hild ("battle")

Notable bearer: Ulvhild Håkansdotter, Scandinavian queen (c. 1095-c. 1148)

The name belongs to two characters in Sigrid Undset's trilogy about medieval Norway, Kristin Lavransdatter.

ULRIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: uyl-REE-ka
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Swedish feminine form of ULRICH. This was the name of two queens of Sweden.
UBERTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: oo-BEHR-to
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
Italian form of HUBERT.
TULLIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: TOOL-lyo
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Italian form of the Roman family name Tullius, derived from the praenomen Tullus, which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer was Marcus Tullius Cicero, a Roman orator and author.
TULLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: TOOL-lya(Italian)
Rating: 68% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of Tullius (see TULLIO).
TREVELYAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: tri-VEHL-yən
Rating: 56% based on 10 votes
From a surname that was derived from a Cornish place name meaning "homestead on the hill".
TIRZAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
Rating: 69% based on 12 votes
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
TIRESIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology, Greek
Pronounced: Tie-REE-see-us(Classical Greek, Greek Mythology, Greek)
Rating: 44% based on 21 votes
Tiresias was born a man, but was changed into a woman as punishment by a vengeful goddess (either Hera or Athena) when he disturbed an act held sacred to her. Most sources say it was Athena, who was angered when Tiresias used his staff to strike two mating snakes. The goddess regretted her rash action, but could not undo Tiresias's transformation, so gave him/her the gift of prophecy instead. (Some speculate this is where the universal medical alert symbol of two snakes intertwined with a winged rod came from.) Tiresias spent a good many years as a woman when he happened upon that same eventful spot in his late years and discovered again, two mating snakes. He struck them again with his staff and was changed back into a man. Tiresias, as an elderly male prophet, is a character in the Greek drama Antigone.
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Greek name meaning “sign, portent”. In Greek mythology, Tiresias was a blind prophet of Thebes, famous for clairvoyance, and for being transformed into a woman for seven years. He was the son of the shepherd Everes and the nymph Chariclo. He lived for seven generations, beginning as the advisor of Cadmus. Tiresias was a common title for soothsayers in Greek history, which suggests that Tiresias is not a personal name, but a (possibly hereditary) epithet for those who foresaw the future. It may also help explain his abnormally long life.
TIMOTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1], Greek
Other Scripts: Τιμοθέα(Greek)
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of TIMOTHY.
TIHOMIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Тихомира(Bulgarian)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of TIHOMIR.
THORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Rating: 71% based on 40 votes
Modern form of ÞÓRA.
THOMASINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: tahm-ə-SEE-nə
Rating: 50% based on 42 votes
Medieval feminine form of THOMAS.
THISTLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare, Archaic)
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
From the name of the flower, which is the national symbol of Scotland. The word is from the Old English þistel.
THISBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Θίσβη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 59% based on 9 votes
From the name of an ancient Greek town in Boeotia, itself supposedly named after a nymph. In a Greek legend (the oldest surviving version appearing in Latin in Ovid's Metamorphoses) this is the name of a young woman from Babylon. Believing her to be dead, her lover Pyramus kills himself, after which she does the same to herself. The splashes of blood from their suicides is the reason mulberry fruit are red.
THESSALY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Thessaly is a traditional geographic and modern administrative region of Greece, comprising most of the ancient region of the same name. This name is borne by Thessaly Lerner, American stage, film and voice actress.
THEODOSIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Θεοδόσιος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DO-shəs(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοδόσιος (Theodosios) meaning "giving to god", derived from θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δόσις (dosis) meaning "giving". Saint Theodosius of Palestine was a monk who founded a monastery near Bethlehem in the 5th century. This also was the name of emperors of the Eastern Roman and Byzantine Empires.
THEODOSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδοσία(Greek)
Pronounced: TEH-O-DO-SEE-A(Classical Greek) thee-ə-DO-see-ə(English) thee-ə-DO-shə(English)
Rating: 51% based on 44 votes
Feminine form of THEODOSIUS.
THEODORIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: thee-AHD-ə-rik(English)
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the elements theud "people" and ric "ruler". It was notably borne by Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy. By Theodoric's time the Ostrogoths were partially Romanized and his name was regularly recorded as Theodoricus. The Gothic original may have been Þiudreiks.
THEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 68% based on 49 votes
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THEOBALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: THEE-ə-bawld(English)
Rating: 36% based on 43 votes
Means "bold people", derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and bald "bold". The Normans brought the name to England, where it joined an existing Old English cognate. The medieval forms Tibald and Tebald were commonly Latinized as Theobaldus. It was rare by the 20th century.
THEMISTOCLEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of THEMISTOKLEIA. This was the name of a Greek priestess, philosopher and mathematician from the 6th century BC, who was the teacher of Pythagoras. After Pythagoras coined the term "philosophy", Themistoclea became the first woman in history to whom the word "philosopher" was applied.
THELONIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Rating: 49% based on 14 votes
Latinized form of Tielo (see TILO). A famous bearer was jazz musician Thelonious Monk (1917-1982).
THADDEUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Θαδδαῖος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: THAD-ee-əs(English) tha-DEE-əs(English)
Rating: 58% based on 36 votes
From Θαδδαῖος (Thaddaios), the Greek form of the Aramaic name Thaddai. It is possibly derived from a word meaning "heart", but it may in fact be an Aramaic form of a Greek name such as Θεόδωρος (see THEODORE). In the Gospel of Matthew, Thaddaeus is listed as one of the twelve apostles, though elsewhere in the New Testament his name is omitted and Jude's appears instead. It is likely that the two names refer to the same person.
TERTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of TERTIUS.
TERPSICHORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Τερψιχόρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TEHR-PSEE-KO-REH(Classical Greek) tərp-SIK-ə-ree(English)
Rating: 31% based on 37 votes
Means "enjoying the dance" from Greek τέρψις (terpsis) meaning "delight" and χορός (choros) meaning "dance". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and dramatic chorus, one of the nine Muses.
TÉLESPHORE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Archaic)
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
French form of the Greek name Τελεσφόρος (Telesphoros) meaning "bringing fulfillment" or "bearing fruit" [1]. Saint Telesphorus was a 2nd-century pope and martyr.
TANITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Rating: 37% based on 18 votes
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.
TALITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Pronounced: TAL-i-thə(English) tə-LEE-thə(English)
Rating: 72% based on 13 votes
Means "little girl" in Aramaic. The name is taken from the phrase talitha cumi meaning "little girl arise" spoken by Jesus in order to restore a young girl to life (see Mark 5:41).
TACITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 44% based on 31 votes
Feminine form of TACITUS.
SYNCLETICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Συγκλητική(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of the Greek feminine given name Συγκλητική (Synkletike), which is derived from the Greek adjective συγκλητικός (synkletikos) - also found spelled as sugkletikos - meaning "of senatorial rank".

The word is ultimately derived from Greek σύγκλητος (synkletos) - also found spelled as sugkletos - which originally meant "called together, summoned" but later came to mean "senate, council, assembly" (possibly in reference to the Byzantine Senate). It is a compound word that consists of Greek σύν (syn) "beside, with, together" combined with Greek κλητέος (kleteos) meaning "to be called, to be named". The latter element is ultimately derived from the Greek verb κλέω (kleo) meaning "to call". Also compare the Greek verb κλητεύω (kleteuo) meaning "to summon into court".

Syncletica is the name of two saints of the Orthodox Church, one of which is Syncletica of Alexandria (4th century AD).

SYLVÈRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Rating: 51% based on 8 votes
Variant spelling of SILVÈRE. A known bearer of this name is the French literary critic and cultural theorist Sylvère Lotringer (b. 1938).
SYLVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 70% based on 9 votes
Either a variant of SILVANUS or directly from the Latin word silva meaning "wood, forest".
SWITHIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Rating: 37% based on 16 votes
From the Old English name Swiðhun or Swiþhun, derived from swiþ "strong" and perhaps hun "bear cub". Saint Swithin was a 9th-century bishop of Winchester.
SWANHILDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Rating: 52% based on 9 votes
Variant of SWANHILD.
SVETLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Светлана(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: svyit-LA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Derived from Slavic svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem Svetlana (1813) by the Russian poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.
SUSANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Сусанна(Russian) שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew) Сꙋсанна(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: soo-ZAN-na(Italian) soo-ZAN-nə(Catalan) suy-SAN-na(Swedish) SOO-sahn-nah(Finnish) suw-SAN-nə(Russian) suy-SAH-na(Dutch) soo-ZAN-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 51 votes
From Σουσάννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.

As an English name, it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Old Testament heroine. It did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, at which time it was often spelled Susan.

SUFYAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Urdu
Other Scripts: سفيان(Arabic) سفیان(Urdu)
Pronounced: SOOF-yan(Indonesian)
Rating: 49% based on 9 votes
Meaning uncertain. It could be derived from Arabic صوف (suf) meaning "wool", صفا (safa) meaning "pure, clean" or صعف (sa'f) meaning "slim, thin". Sufyan al-Thawri was an 8th-century Islamic scholar.
SOSIPATRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Romanian (Rare), Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Σωσιπάτρα(Ancient Greek) Сосипатра(Russian)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of SOSIPATROS. This name was borne by the Greek philosopher Sosipatra of Ephesus (4th century AD).
SOPHRONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Σωφρονία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 58% based on 44 votes
Feminine form of SOPHRONIUS. Torquato Tasso used it in his epic poem Jerusalem Delivered (1580), in which it is borne by the lover of Olindo.
SOPHONISBA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Near Eastern (Latinized), History, Literature
Rating: 61% based on 16 votes
A classical rendering of the original Carthaginian name Saphanba'al, possibly meaning "Ba'al has sheltered her", from the Punic element saphan "sheltered" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Sophonisba was a 3rd-century BCE Carthaginian princess whose name was mentioned in this form by Roman historians Livy and Appian and later popularized by numerous playwrights from the 15th century onwards.
SOMERLED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 42% based on 37 votes
Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Sumarliði meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Scottish warlord who created a kingdom on the Scottish islands.
SOLVEIG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: SOOL-vie(Norwegian) SOOL-vay(Swedish)
Rating: 53% based on 43 votes
From an Old Norse name, which was derived from the elements sól "sun" and veig "strength". This is the name of the heroine in Henrik Ibsen's play Peer Gynt (1876).
SOLLEMNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Latin form of SOLANGE.
SOLANGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LAHNZH
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
French form of the Late Latin name Sollemnia, which was derived from Latin sollemnis "religious". This was the name of a French shepherdess who became a saint after she was killed by her master.
SILVIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: SEEL-vyo(Italian) SEEL-byo(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
Italian and Spanish form of SILVIUS.
SILVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, German, Dutch, English, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: SEEL-vya(Italian) SEEL-bya(Spanish) ZIL-vya(German) SIL-vee-ə(English)
Rating: 57% based on 42 votes
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SILVESTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Slovene
Pronounced: seel-VEH-stra(Italian)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovak, Slovene, Serbian, German, English, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Силвестер(Serbian)
Pronounced: zil-VEHS-tu(German) sil-VEHS-tər(English)
Rating: 58% based on 16 votes
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
SIGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
Pronounced: SEE-grid(Swedish) SEEG-reed(Finnish)
Rating: 57% based on 47 votes
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SIGMUND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: ZEEK-muwnt(German) SEEG-mund(Swedish) SIG-mənd(English)
Rating: 50% based on 41 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SIEGLINDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: zeek-LIN-də(German)
Rating: 43% based on 40 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and lind "soft, tender, flexible". Sieglinde was the mother of Siegfried in the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied.
SIBYLLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, German
Pronounced: zee-BI-la(German)
Rating: 56% based on 30 votes
Latinate form of SIBYL.
SIBYL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIB-əl
Rating: 63% based on 27 votes
From Greek Σίβυλλα (Sibylla), meaning "prophetess, sibyl". In Greek and Roman legend the sibyls were female prophets who practiced at different holy sites in the ancient world. In later Christian theology, the sibyls were thought to have divine knowledge and were revered in much the same way as the Old Testament prophets. Because of this, the name came into general use in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans imported it to England, where it was spelled both Sibyl and Sybil. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps helped by Benjamin Disraeli's novel Sybil (1845).
SHEHERAZADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of SHAHRAZAD.
SHAKUNTALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Other Scripts: शकुन्तला(Sanskrit) शकुंतला(Hindi, Marathi)
Rating: 29% based on 7 votes
Derived from Sanskrit शकुन्त (shakunta) meaning "bird". This is the name of a character in Hindu legend, her story adapted by Kalidasa for the 5th-century play Abhijnanashakuntalam. It tells how Shakuntala, who was raised in the forest by birds, meets and marries the king Dushyanta. After a curse is laid upon them Dushyanta loses his memory and they are separated, but eventually the curse is broken after the king sees the signet ring he gave her.
SEVERIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Norwegian (Rare), Swedish (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Pronounced: zeh-veh-REEN(German) ZEH-veh-reen(German)
Rating: 45% based on 10 votes
German and Scandinavian form of SEVERINUS.
SEPTIMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: SEHP-tee-moos
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Roman praenomen, or given name, which meant "seventh" in Latin.
SÉGOLÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-GAW-LEHN
Rating: 45% based on 36 votes
Possibly a French form of SIEGLINDE.
SATURNINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish
Pronounced: sa-toor-NEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of SATURNINUS. This was the name of a legendary saint who was supposedly martyred in northern France.
SASKIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German
Pronounced: SAHS-kee-a:(Dutch) ZAS-kya(German)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
From the Germanic element sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SARASWATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Other Scripts: सरस्वती(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi)
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Means "possessing water" from Sanskrit सरस् (saras) meaning "fluid, water, lake" and वती (vati) meaning "having". This is the name of a Hindu river goddess, also associated with learning and the arts, who is the wife of Brahma.
SAPPHO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σαπφώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SAP-PAW(Classical Greek) SA-fo(English)
Rating: 36% based on 30 votes
Possibly from Greek σάπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Greek poetess from Lesbos.
SANDHYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam
Other Scripts: संध्या(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi) సంధ్యా(Telugu) சந்தியா(Tamil) ಸಂಧ್ಯಾ(Kannada) സന്ധ്യ(Malayalam)
Rating: 58% based on 10 votes
Means "twilight" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the daughter of the Hindu god Brahma.
RUPERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: ROO-pehrt(German) RUY-pərt(Dutch) ROO-pərt(English)
Rating: 61% based on 49 votes
German variant form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.
RUFUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Biblical
Pronounced: ROO-foos(Latin) ROO-fəs(English)
Rating: 52% based on 45 votes
Roman cognomen meaning "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.
RUDOLF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Dutch, Russian, Armenian
Other Scripts: Рудольф(Russian) Ռուդոլֆ(Armenian)
Pronounced: ROO-dawlf(German, Slovak) ROO-dolf(Czech, Hungarian) RUY-dawlf(Dutch)
Rating: 42% based on 47 votes
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel The Prisoner of Zenda (1894).
ROXANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ῥωξάνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə(English) rok-SA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 26 votes
Latin form of Ῥωξάνη (Rhoxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak), which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel Roxana (1724).
ROSWITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: raws-VEE-ta
Rating: 47% based on 26 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and swinth "strength". This was the name of a 10th-century nun from Saxony who wrote several notable poems and dramas.
ROSINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RO-ZEEN
Rating: 57% based on 22 votes
French diminutive of ROSE.
ROSINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ro-ZEE-na
Rating: 55% based on 33 votes
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1). This is the name of a character in Rossini's opera The Barber of Seville (1816).
ROSEMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree, ROZ-mehr-ee
Rating: 75% based on 59 votes
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROSAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Means "golden rose", derived from Latin rosa "rose" and aurea "golden". This name was (first?) used by Pedro Calderón de la Barca for a character in his play Life Is a Dream (1635).
ROSAMUND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RO-zə-mənd, RAHZ-ə-mənd
Rating: 67% based on 50 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.
ROSALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-zə-leen, RAHZ-ə-lin, RAHZ-ə-lien
Rating: 72% based on 53 votes
Medieval variant of ROSALIND. This is the name of characters in Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost (1594) and Romeo and Juliet (1596).
ROSALIND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHZ-ə-lind
Rating: 77% based on 56 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hros meaning "horse" and lind meaning "soft, tender, flexible". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it was not common. During the Middle Ages its spelling was influenced by the Latin phrase rosa linda "beautiful rose". The name was popularized by Edmund Spencer, who used it in his poetry, and by William Shakespeare, who used it for the heroine in his comedy As You Like It (1599).
ROSALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: ro-za-LEE-a(Italian)
Rating: 83% based on 6 votes
Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.
ROMULUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: RO-moo-loos(Latin) RAHM-yuw-ləs(English)
Rating: 56% based on 36 votes
Means "of Rome" in Latin. In Roman legend Romulus and Remus were the founders of the city of Rome.
ROMOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: RO-mo-la
Rating: 41% based on 32 votes
Italian feminine form of ROMULUS.
ROLLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHL-o
Rating: 34% based on 20 votes
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of ROLF. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
ROLAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Medieval French
Pronounced: RO-lənd(English) RAW-LAHN(French) RO-lant(German) RO-lahnt(Dutch) RO-lawnd(Hungarian) RAW-lant(Polish)
Rating: 74% based on 47 votes
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic La Chanson de Roland, in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROHESE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 43% based on 9 votes
Norman French form of HRODOHAIDIS.
RITVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: REET-vah
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
Means "birch branch" in Finnish.
RICHENZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Medieval English, American (Rare), Medieval German
Pronounced: ree-khen-zah(Polish)
Rating: 37% based on 21 votes
Polish and medieval English and medieval German form of RIKISSA.
RICHENDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British, Rare), English (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: ri-SHEHN-də(English)
Rating: 26% based on 9 votes
Variant of the medieval name RICHENZA, used since at least the 18th century. It is often regarded as a feminine form of RICHARD. A known bearer is English actress Richenda Carey (1948-).
RICHEMAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 23% based on 12 votes
Medieval English form of Old English RÍCMÆG.
RHODA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: Ῥόδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RO-də(English)
Rating: 32% based on 32 votes
Derived from Greek ῥόδον (rhodon) meaning "rose". In the New Testament this name was borne by a maid in the house of Mary the mother of John Mark. As an English given name, Rhoda came into use in the 17th century.
REGINALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REHJ-ə-nəld
Rating: 41% based on 39 votes
From Reginaldus, a Latinized form of REYNOLD.
RADMILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Czech
Other Scripts: Радмила(Serbian)
Pronounced: RAD-mi-la(Czech)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Serbian, Croatian and Czech feminine form of RADOMIL.
PURNIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Tamil, Kannada
Other Scripts: पूर्णिमा(Hindi, Marathi) পূর্ণিমা(Bengali) பூர்ணிமா(Tamil) ಪೂರ್ಣಿಮಾ(Kannada)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Means "full moon" in Sanskrit.
PSYCHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ψυχή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PSUY-KEH(Classical Greek) SIE-kee(English)
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
Means "the soul", derived from Greek ψύχω (psycho) meaning "to breathe". The Greeks thought that the breath was the soul. In Greek mythology Psyche was a beautiful maiden who was beloved by Eros (or Cupid in Roman mythology). She is the subject of Keats's poem Ode to Psyche (1819).
PRUNELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: proo-NEHL-ə
Rating: 47% based on 23 votes
From the English word for the type of flower, also called self-heal, ultimately a derivative of the Latin word pruna "plum".
PRUDENCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: PROO-dəns(English) PRUY-DAHNS(French)
Rating: 45% based on 35 votes
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
PRIMROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-roz
Rating: 73% based on 12 votes
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".
PRASKOVYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Прасковья(Russian)
Pronounced: pru-SKO-vyə
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
Russian form of PARASKEVE.
POLYXENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Πολυξένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pə-LIK-sin-ə(English)
Rating: 58% based on 20 votes
Latinized form of Greek Πολυξένη (Polyxene), which was from the word πολύξενος (polyxenos) meaning "entertaining many guests, very hospitable", itself derived from πολύς (polys) meaning "many" and ξένος (xenos) meaning "foreigner, guest". In Greek legend she was a daughter of Priam and Hecuba, beloved by Achilles. After the Trojan War, Achilles' son Neoptolemus sacrificed her.
POLYMNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πολύμνια, Πολυύμνια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PO-LUYM-NEE-A(Classical Greek)
Rating: 38% based on 38 votes
Means "abounding in song", derived from Greek πολύς (polys) meaning "much" and ὕμνος (hymnos) meaning "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.
POLISSENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Rating: 49% based on 13 votes
Italian form of POLYXENA.
PIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Slovene, Late Roman
Pronounced: PEE-a(Italian, Swedish, Danish, German)
Rating: 53% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of PIUS.
PHYLLIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FIL-i-də
Rating: 39% based on 39 votes
From Φυλλίδος (Phyllidos), the genitive form of PHYLLIS. This form was used in 17th-century pastoral poetry.
PHILOMENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Φιλομένα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: fil-ə-MEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 59% based on 41 votes
From Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and μένος (menos) meaning "mind, strength, force". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in 1802 after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομήνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
PHILOMELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φιλομήλη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: fil-ə-MEE-lə(English)
Rating: 64% based on 36 votes
From Greek Φιλομήλη (Philomele), derived from φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend" and μῆλον (melon) meaning "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μέλος (melos) meaning "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.
PHILIPPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), German
Pronounced: FI-li-pə(English)
Rating: 59% based on 15 votes
Latinate feminine form of PHILIP.
PETUNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: pə-TOON-yə
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
From the name of the flower, derived ultimately from a Tupi (South American) word.
PETRONELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Dutch and Swedish form of PETRONILLA.
PERPETUA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: pehr-PEH-twa(Spanish)
Rating: 44% based on 10 votes
Derived from Latin perpetuus meaning "continuous". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred with another woman named Felicity.
PEREGRINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEHR-ə-grin
Rating: 71% based on 50 votes
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
PERCIVAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, English
Pronounced: PUR-si-vəl(English)
Rating: 61% based on 45 votes
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem Perceval, the Story of the Grail. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail. The character (and probably the name) of Perceval was based on that of the Welsh hero PEREDUR. The spelling was perhaps altered under the influence of Old French percer val "to pierce the valley".
PEONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEE-ə-nee
Rating: 50% based on 46 votes
From the English word for the type of flower. It was originally believed to have healing qualities, so it was named after the Greek medical god Pæon.
PELAGIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1], Greek, Polish (Rare)
Other Scripts: Πελαγία(Greek)
Pronounced: peh-LA-gya(Polish)
Rating: 47% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of PELAGIUS. This was the name of a few early saints, including a young 4th-century martyr who threw herself from a rooftop in Antioch rather than lose her virginity.
PASCAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, German, Dutch
Pronounced: PAS-KAL(French) pas-KAL(German) pahs-KAHL(Dutch)
Rating: 47% based on 44 votes
From the Late Latin name Paschalis, which meant "relating to Easter" from Latin Pascha "Easter", which was in turn from Hebrew פֶּסַח (pesach) meaning "Passover". Passover is the ancient Hebrew holiday celebrating the liberation from Egypt. Because it coincided closely with the later Christian holiday of Easter, the same Latin word was used for both. The name Pascal can also function as a surname, as in the case of Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), the French philosopher, mathematician and inventor.
PARTHENOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παρθενόπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pahr-THEHN-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 38% based on 39 votes
Means "maiden's voice", derived from Greek παρθένος (parthenos) meaning "maiden, virgin" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "voice". In Greek legend this is the name of one of the Sirens who enticed Odysseus.
PANKRAZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: PANG-krats
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
German form of PANCRATIUS.
OTTOLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 54% based on 43 votes
Diminutive of OTTILIE. A famous bearer was the British socialite Lady Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938).
OTTILIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: aw-TEE-lyə
Rating: 50% based on 42 votes
German form of ODILIA.
OTTILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: oot-TEE-lee-ah
Rating: 45% based on 35 votes
Swedish form of ODILIA.
OTTAVIANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Italian form of Octavianus (see OCTAVIAN).
OTTAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ot-TA-vya
Rating: 68% based on 14 votes
Italian form of OCTAVIA.
OSANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Italian form of HOSANNA. This was the name of a 15th-century Italian saint and mystic, as well as a 16th-century Montenegrin saint.
ORTRUN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: AWRT-roon
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements ort "point" and run "secret".
OLYMPIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Slovak
Other Scripts: Ολυμπία(Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 43 votes
Feminine form of OLYMPOS.
OLGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ольга(Russian, Ukrainian) Олга(Serbian, Bulgarian) Όλγα(Greek)
Pronounced: OL-gə(Russian) AWL-ga(Polish, German) AWL-ka(Icelandic) OL-gaw(Hungarian) OL-gha(Spanish) OL-ga(Czech)
Rating: 37% based on 51 votes
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLALLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: o-LA-ya
Rating: 43% based on 19 votes
Spanish variant of EULALIA. This was the name of two 4th-century saints from Spain.
OLAF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
Pronounced: O-laf(German) O-lahf(Dutch) AW-laf(Polish)
Rating: 42% based on 12 votes
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
OENONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Οἰνώνε(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-NO-nee(English)
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Latinized form of the Greek Οἰνώνε (Oinone), derived from οἶνος (oinos) meaning "wine". In Greek mythology Oenone was a mountain nymph who was married to Paris before he went after Helen.
ODILE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DEEL
Rating: 36% based on 45 votes
French form of ODILIA.
ODETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-DEHT
Rating: 54% based on 48 votes
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet Swan Lake (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.
NINIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic
Rating: 35% based on 13 votes
Meaning unknown. It appears in a Latinized form Niniavus, which could be from the Welsh name NYNNIAW. This was the name of a 5th-century British saint who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He is known as the Apostle to the Picts.
NIMUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay(English)
Rating: 69% based on 10 votes
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French Lancelot-Grail cycle.
NEVENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Невена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Rating: 54% based on 21 votes
Derived from South Slavic neven meaning "marigold".
NEPHELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νεφέλη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NEH-PEH-LEH(Classical Greek) NEHF-ə-lee(English)
Rating: 54% based on 14 votes
From Greek νέφος (nephos) meaning "cloud". In Greek legend Nephele was created from a cloud by Zeus, who shaped the cloud to look like Hera in order to trick Ixion, a mortal who desired her. Nephele was the mother of the centaurs by Ixion, and was also the mother of Phrixus and Helle by Athamus.
NEDELYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Неделя(Bulgarian)
Rating: 36% based on 10 votes
Means "Sunday" in Bulgarian.
NAUSICAA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ναυσικάα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 43% based on 14 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ναυσικάα (Nausikaa) meaning "burner of ships". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of a daughter of Alcinous who helps Odysseus on his journey home.
NARCISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: nahr-SIS-ə(English)
Rating: 51% based on 20 votes
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
MYRTLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MUR-təl
Rating: 50% based on 35 votes
Simply from the English word myrtle for the evergreen shrub, ultimately from Greek μύρτος (myrtos). It was first used as a given name in the 19th century, at the same time many other plant and flower names were coined.
MURIEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Irish
Pronounced: MYUWR-ee-əl(English) MUY-RYEHL(French)
Rating: 48% based on 36 votes
Medieval English form of a Breton name that was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel John Halifax, Gentleman (1856).
MOSES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: מֹשֶׁה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MOZ-is(English)
Rating: 34% based on 10 votes
From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh), which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology (see Exodus 2:10).

The biblical Moses was drawn out of the Nile by the pharaoh's daughter and adopted into the royal family, at a time when the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. With his brother Aaron he demanded the pharaoh release the Israelites, which was only done after God sent ten plagues upon Egypt. Moses led the people across the Red Sea and to Mount Sinai, where he received the Ten Commandments from God. After 40 years of wandering in the desert the people reached Canaan, the Promised Land, but Moses died just before entering it.

In England, this name has been commonly used by Christians since the Protestant Reformation, though it had long been popular among Jews.

MNEMOSYNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Μνημοσύνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MNEH-MO-SUY-NEH(Classical Greek) ni-MAWS-i-nee(English)
Rating: 31% based on 11 votes
Means "remembrance" in Greek. In Greek mythology Mnemosyne was a Titan goddess of memory. She was the mother by Zeus of the nine Muses.
MINERVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, English
Pronounced: mi-NUR-və(English)
Rating: 67% based on 52 votes
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MIMOSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Finnish, French, Spanish, Danish, Filipino, Italian
Pronounced: MI-maw-sah(Finnish) Mim-osa(French) mee-MO-sah(Spanish)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
From Mimosa, a genus of plants that are sensitive to touch. The best known plant from that genus is the Mimosa pudica, better known in English as the touch-me-not. The plant genus derives its name from Spanish mimosa, which is the feminine form of the Spanish adjective mimoso meaning "cuddly".
MILLICENT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIL-i-sənt
Rating: 66% based on 53 votes
From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.
MILDRED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIL-drid
Rating: 40% based on 49 votes
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman Conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MEROFLEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic, History
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Derived from Old High German mâri "famous" combined with flâdi "beauty, respectability." Merofleda was one of the wives of Charibert I, a 6th-century Merovingian king of Paris.
MENODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Μηνοδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 47% based on 17 votes
Means "gift of the moon", derived from Greek μήνη (mene) meaning "moon" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a 4th-century saint who was martyred with her sisters Metrodora and Nymphodora.
MELUSINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mythology
Rating: 40% based on 29 votes
Meaning unknown. In European folklore Melusine was a water fairy who turned into a serpent from the waist down every Saturday. She made her husband, Raymond of Poitou, promise that he would never see her on that day, and when he broke his word she left him forever.
MELPOMENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Μελπομένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MEHL-PO-MEH-NEH(Classical Greek) mehl-PAHM-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 38% based on 38 votes
Derived from Greek μέλπω (melpo) meaning "to sing, to celebrate with song". This was the name of one of the nine Muses in Greek mythology, the muse of tragedy.
MÉLISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 75% based on 45 votes
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play Pelléas et Mélisande (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).
MAURIZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mow-REET-tsya
Rating: 39% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of MAURIZIO.
MAUD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: MAWD(English) MOD(French)
Rating: 53% based on 47 votes
Usual medieval form of MATILDA. Though it became rare after the 14th century, it was revived and once more grew popular in the 19th century, perhaps due to Alfred Lord Tennyson's 1855 poem Maud [1].
MATHILDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: MA-TEELD(French) ma-TIL-də(German) ma:-TIL-də(Dutch)
Rating: 76% based on 55 votes
Form of MATILDA in several languages.
MARIGOLD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAR-i-gold, MEHR-i-gold
Rating: 69% based on 49 votes
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of MARY and the English word gold.
MARIANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Μαριανθη(Greek)
Rating: 50% based on 22 votes
Meaning unknown, probably a combination of MARIA and ANTHE.
MARGUERITE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GU-REET
Rating: 73% based on 50 votes
French form of MARGARET. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARGERY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-jə-ree
Rating: 50% based on 43 votes
Medieval English form of MARGARET.
MARGARETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Romanian, Slovene, Finnish, Croatian
Pronounced: mar-ga-REH-ta(German) MAHR-gah-reh-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 66% based on 46 votes
Form of MARGARET in several languages.
MARGALIT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מַרְגָלִית(Hebrew)
Rating: 48% based on 39 votes
Means "pearl" in Hebrew, ultimately from Greek μαργαρίτης (margarites).
MARCELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mar-CHEHL-la(Italian)
Rating: 61% based on 13 votes
Feminine form of MARCELLUS.
MANFRED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Polish
Pronounced: MAN-freht(German, Polish) MAHN-frət(Dutch)
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "strength" and frid "peace". This is the name of the main character in Lord Byron's drama Manfred (1817). This name was also borne by Manfred von Richthofen (1892-1918), the German pilot in World War I who was known as the Red Baron.
MANASSEH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מְנַשֶּׁה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mə-NAS-ə(English)
Rating: 29% based on 9 votes
Means "causing to forget" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the oldest son of Joseph and Asenath and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. It was also borne by a 7th-century BC king of Judah, condemned in the bible for allowing the worship of other gods.
MAGDALENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Catalan, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, English
Other Scripts: Магдалена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: mag-da-LEH-na(Polish) mak-da-LEH-na(German) magh-dha-LEH-na(Spanish) məg-də-LEH-nə(Catalan) MAG-da-leh-na(Czech) mag-də-LAY-nə(English)
Rating: 74% based on 8 votes
Latinate form of MAGDALENE.
MAFALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: ma-FAL-da(Italian) mu-FAL-du(Portuguese)
Rating: 53% based on 11 votes
Italian and Portuguese form of MATILDA.
MADDALENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mad-da-LEH-na
Rating: 59% based on 7 votes
Italian form of MAGDALENE.
LUSCINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Italian (Rare), Roman Mythology
Rating: 46% based on 11 votes
Derived from Latin luscinia "nightingale". This was an epithet of the Roman goddess Minerva. As an English name, it has been used sparingly since the 19th century.
LULJETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Means "flower of life" in Albanian, from lule "flower" and jetë "life".
LUDOVICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: loo-do-VEE-ka
Rating: 53% based on 19 votes
Latinate feminine form of LUDWIG.
LUDOVIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-DAW-VEEK
Rating: 56% based on 24 votes
Medieval Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of an 1833 opera by the French composer Fromental Halévy.
LUDMILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Latvian, Russian
Other Scripts: Людмила(Russian)
Pronounced: LOOD-mi-la(Czech) lyuwd-MYEE-lə(Russian)
Rating: 51% based on 40 votes
Means "favour of the people" from the Slavic elements lyudu "people" and milu "gracious, dear". Saint Ludmila was a 10th-century duchess of Bohemia, the grandmother of Saint Václav. She was murdered on the orders of her daughter-in-law Drahomíra.

As a Russian name, this is an alternate transcription of Людмила (usually rendered LYUDMILA).

LUCREZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: loo-KREHT-tsya
Rating: 56% based on 17 votes
Italian form of LUCRETIA.
LUCRETIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-KREE-shə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 48 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum meaning "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
LUCINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-SIE-nə(English) loo-SEE-nə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.
LUCILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Rating: 62% based on 25 votes
Latin diminutive of LUCIA. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred in Rome.
LUCETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of LUCE. Shakespeare used this name for a character in his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).
LOUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə(English) loo-EE-za(German)
Rating: 76% based on 56 votes
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of Little Women.
LORENZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LO-rents
Rating: 40% based on 12 votes
German form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LINUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Other Scripts: Λίνος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LIE-nəs(English) LEE-nuys(Swedish) LEE-nuws(German)
Rating: 56% based on 49 votes
From the Greek name Λίνος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip Peanuts.
LETO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Λητώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-TAW(Classical Greek) LEE-to(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Possibly from Lycian lada meaning "wife". Other theories connect it to Greek λήθω (letho) meaning "hidden, forgotten". In Greek mythology she was the mother of Apollo and Artemis by Zeus.
LETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: li-TISH-ə
Rating: 48% based on 43 votes
From the Late Latin name Laetitia meaning "joy, happiness". This was the name of an obscure saint, who is revered mainly in Spain. It was in use in England during the Middle Ages, usually in the spelling Lettice, and it was revived in the 18th century.
LÉOPOLDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LEH-AW-PAWL-DEEN
Rating: 40% based on 40 votes
French feminine form of LEOPOLD.
LEOPOLDINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare), English (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Galician, Romanian, Slovene, Hungarian
Rating: 38% based on 13 votes
German, Portuguese and English variant and Galician, Romanian, Hungarian and Slovene form of LEOPOLDINE. Leopoldina of Austria (1797 – 1826) was the first Brazilian empress.
LEOPOLD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Polish
Pronounced: LEH-o-pawlt(German, Dutch) LEE-ə-pold(English) LEH-o-polt(Czech) LEH-aw-pawld(Slovak) leh-AW-pawlt(Polish)
Rating: 65% based on 52 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel Ulysses (1922).
LÉONTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LEH-AWN-TEEN
Rating: 65% based on 48 votes
French form of LEONTINA.
LEONTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Late Roman
Rating: 50% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of LEONTIUS.
LEONORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 72% based on 52 votes
Italian short form of ELEANOR.
LEONATO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Theatre
Rating: 38% based on 19 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONNATUS. This is the name of the father of Hero and/or BEATRICE in William Shakespeare's romantic comedy 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).
LEOFRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "ruler, mighty".
LEOCADIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: leh-o-KA-dhya(Spanish)
Rating: 66% based on 14 votes
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκός (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
LEDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Λήδα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-DA(Classical Greek) LEE-də(English) LAY-də(English)
Rating: 60% based on 37 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek myth she was the mother of Castor, Pollux, Helen and Clytemnestra by the god Zeus, who came upon her in the form of a swan.
LAVINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 69% based on 47 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
LAURENCE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əns
Rating: 66% based on 52 votes
From the Roman cognomen Laurentius, which meant "from Laurentum". Laurentum was a city in ancient Italy, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus "laurel". Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome. According to tradition he was roasted alive on a gridiron because, when ordered to hand over the church's treasures, he presented the sick and poor. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in the Christian world (in various spellings).

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England, partly because of a second saint by this name, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury. Likewise it has been common in Ireland due to the 12th-century Saint Laurence O'Toole (whose real name was Lorcán). Since the 19th century the spelling Lawrence has been more common, especially in America. A famous bearer was the British actor Laurence Olivier (1907-1989).

LARKSPUR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: LAHRK-spər
Rating: 59% based on 11 votes
From the English word for the flowering plant with many purplish-blue flowers, which is so called (1578) from its resemblance to the lark's large hind claws. Other names for it are lark's heel (Shakespeare), lark's claw and knight's spur. See LARK.
LALAGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 26% based on 22 votes
Derived from Greek λαλαγέω (lalageo) meaning "to babble, to prattle". The Roman poet Horace used this name in one of his odes.
JUNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman
Rating: 69% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of JUNIUS. This was the name of an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament (there is some debate about whether the name belongs to a man or a woman).
JUDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Jewish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, French, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוּדִית(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JOO-dith(English) YOO-dit(German) khoo-DHEET(Spanish) ZHUY-DEET(French)
Rating: 54% based on 45 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "Jewish woman", feminine of יְהוּדִי (yehudi), ultimately referring to a person from the tribe of Judah. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.

As an English name it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, despite a handful of early examples during the Middle Ages. It was however used earlier on the European continent, being borne by several European royals, such as the 9th-century Judith of Bavaria.

JOLYON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 31% based on 16 votes
Medieval form of JULIAN. The author John Galsworthy used it for a character in his Forsyte Saga novels (published between 1906 and 1922).
JOCOSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 44% based on 38 votes
Medieval variant of JOYCE, influenced by the Latin word iocosus or jocosus "merry, playful".
JOCASTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἰοκάστη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: jo-KAS-tə(English)
Rating: 47% based on 42 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ἰοκάστη (Iokaste), which is of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology she was the mother Oedipus by the Theban king Laius. In a case of tragic mistaken identity, she married her own son.
JOACHIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Polish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: YO-a-khim(German) yo-A-khim(German) ZHAW-A-KEEM(French) yaw-A-kheem(Polish) JO-ə-kim(English)
Rating: 38% based on 10 votes
Contracted form of JEHOIACHIN or JEHOIAKIM. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
JEROME
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jə-ROM
Rating: 52% based on 44 votes
From the Greek name Ἱερώνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name", derived from ἱερός (hieros) meaning "sacred" and ὄνομα (onoma) meaning "name". Saint Jerome was responsible for the creation of the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible, in the 5th century. He is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. The name was used in his honour in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy and France, and has been used in England since the 12th century [1].
JEMIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יְמִימָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jə-MIE-mə(English)
Rating: 56% based on 53 votes
Means "dove" in Hebrew. This was the oldest of the three daughters of Job in the Old Testament. As an English name, Jemima first became common during the Puritan era.
JANVIER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHAHN-VYEH
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
French form of JANUARIUS. Though now rare in France, it is more common in French-speaking parts of Africa.
IVOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
Pronounced: IE-vawr(English) EE-vawr(English)
Rating: 39% based on 25 votes
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
IVAYLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ивайло(Bulgarian)
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Perhaps derived from an old Bulgar name meaning "wolf". This was the name of a 13th-century emperor of Bulgaria. It is possible that this spelling was the result of a 15th-century misreading of his real name Vulo from historical documents.
ISSACHAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: יִשָּׂשׁכָר(Ancient Hebrew) Ἰσσαχάρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IS-ə-kahr(English)
Rating: 35% based on 24 votes
Possibly means "man of hire" or "there is reward", from Hebrew שָׁכַר (shakhar) meaning "hire, wage, reward". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve sons of Jacob (by Leah) and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. A justification for the name's meaning is given in Genesis 30:18.
ISOLDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
Rating: 77% based on 19 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).

ISMENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἰσμήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EEZ-MEH-NEH(Classical Greek) is-MEE-nee(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Possibly from Greek ἰσμή (isme) meaning "knowledge". This was the name of the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta in Greek legend.
ISIDORE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Georgian (Rare), Jewish
Other Scripts: ისიდორე(Georgian)
Pronounced: IZ-ə-dawr(English) EE-ZEE-DAWR(French)
Rating: 45% based on 44 votes
From the Greek name Ἰσίδωρος (Isidoros) meaning "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess ISIS combined with Greek δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian.

Though it has never been popular in the English-speaking world among Christians, it has historically been a common name for Jews, who have used it as an Americanized form of names such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah.

ISIDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Serbian, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Исидора(Serbian, Russian) Ἰσιδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-see-DHO-ra(Spanish) ee-zee-DO-ra(Italian) iz-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 58% based on 44 votes
Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
ISEULT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOOLT(English) i-ZOOLT(English)
Rating: 56% based on 35 votes
Medieval variant of ISOLDE.
ISAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: ee-SOW-ra(Spanish)
Rating: 45% based on 12 votes
Late Latin name meaning "from Isauria". Isauria was the name of a region in Asia Minor.
ISABEAU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval French, French (Rare), Dutch (Modern)
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
Medieval French variant of ISABEL. A famous bearer of this name was Isabeau of Bavaria (1385-1422), wife of the French king Charles VI.
IPHIGENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἰφιγένεια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 13 votes
Latinized form of IPHIGENEIA.
IOLANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ie-o-LAN-thee(English)
Rating: 69% based on 12 votes
Probably a variant of YOLANDA influenced by the Greek words ἰόλη (iole) meaning "violet" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This name was (first?) used by Gilbert and Sullivan in their comic opera Iolanthe (1882).
INGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ING-rid(Swedish) ING-ri(Norwegian) ING-grit(German, Dutch) ING-greet(German)
Rating: 61% based on 52 votes
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
INGEBORG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Pronounced: ING-ə-bawrk(German)
Rating: 35% based on 40 votes
From the Old Norse name Ingibjǫrg, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with bjǫrg meaning "help, save, rescue".
INEZ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-NEHZ, ee-NEHZ, ie-NEHZ
Rating: 47% based on 30 votes
English form of INÉS.
IMELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ee-MEHL-da
Rating: 48% based on 42 votes
Italian and Spanish form of IRMHILD. The Blessed Imelda was a young 14th-century nun from Bologna.
ILLUMINATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 47% based on 13 votes
Means "illuminated, brightened, filled with light" in Latin. This name was borne by a 4th-century saint from Todi, Italy.
IGNATZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: I-gnats
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
German form of IGNATIUS.
IGNATIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ig-NAY-shəs(English)
Rating: 51% based on 47 votes
From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by Emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.
IGNATIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 47% based on 18 votes
Feminine form of IGNATIUS.
IDONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Medieval English vernacular form of IDONEA.
IDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Polish, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: IE-də(English) EE-da(German, Norwegian, Dutch, Italian, Polish) EE-dah(Swedish, Danish) EE-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 49% based on 42 votes
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem The Princess (1847), which was later adapted into the play Princess Ida (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.

Though the etymology is unrelated, this is the name of a mountain on the island of Crete where, according to Greek myth, the god Zeus was born.

ICARUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἴκαρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IK-ə-rəs(English)
Rating: 51% based on 43 votes
From the Greek Ἴκαρος (Ikaros), of unknown meaning. In Greek myth Icarus was the son of Daedalus, locked with his father inside the Labyrinth by Minos. They escaped from the maze using wings devised from wax, but Icarus flew too close to the sun and the wax melted, plunging him to his death.
IANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἰάνθη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 76% based on 17 votes
Means "violet flower", derived from Greek ἴον (ion) meaning "violet" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This was the name of an ocean nymph in Greek mythology.
HYPATIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ὑπατία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 62% based on 15 votes
Derived from Greek ὕπατος (hypatos) meaning "highest, supreme". Hypatia of Alexandria was a 5th-century philosopher and mathematician, daughter of the mathematician Theon.
HYACINTH (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ὑάκινθος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HIE-ə-sinth(English)
Rating: 63% based on 19 votes
English form of HYACINTHUS.
HUMPHREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUM-free
Rating: 40% based on 46 votes
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in The Maltese Falcon and Casablanca.
HUBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HYOO-bərt(English) HOO-behrt(German) HUY-bərt(Dutch) UY-BEHR(French) KHOO-behrt(Polish)
Rating: 23% based on 12 votes
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century [2].
HORTENSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: AWR-TAHNS(French) HAWR-tehns(English)
Rating: 29% based on 45 votes
French form of HORTENSIA.
HORATIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: hə-RAY-shee-o, hə-RAY-sho
Rating: 45% based on 49 votes
Variant of HORATIUS. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.
HORACE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: HAWR-əs(English) AW-RAS(French)
Rating: 32% based on 15 votes
English and French form of HORATIUS, and the name by which the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus is commonly known those languages. In the modern era it has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, in honour of the poet.
HOMER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ὅμηρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HO-mər(English)
Rating: 38% based on 46 votes
From the Greek name Ὅμηρος (Homeros), derived from ὅμηρος (homeros) meaning "hostage, pledge". Homer was the Greek epic poet who wrote the Iliad, about the Trojan War, and the Odyssey, about Odysseus's journey home after the war. There is some debate about when he lived, or if he was even a real person, though most scholars place him in the 8th century BC. In the modern era, Homer has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world (chiefly in America) since the 18th century. This name is borne by the cartoon father on the television series The Simpsons.
HOA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Vietnamese
Pronounced: HWA, WA
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From Sino-Vietnamese (hoa) meaning "flower".
HIPPOLYTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἱππολύτη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: hi-PAHL-i-tə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 13 votes
Latinized form of HIPPOLYTE (1). Shakespeare used this name in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595).
HILMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Swedish
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Possibly a variant of HELMA or a feminine form of HILMAR.
HILDEGARDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: EEL-DU-GARD
Rating: 43% based on 43 votes
French form of HILDEGARD.
HILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HIL-də(English) HIL-da(German) HIL-dah(Dutch) EEL-da(Spanish)
Rating: 45% based on 53 votes
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HIERONYMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized), German (Archaic), Dutch (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Ἱερώνυμος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: hie-ə-RAWN-i-məs(English) hyeh-RO-nuy-muws(German) hee-yeh-RO-nee-muyz(Dutch)
Rating: 49% based on 10 votes
Latin form of JEROME, formerly common in Germany and the Netherlands. Hieronymus Bosch was a 15th-century Dutch painter known for his depictions of the torments of hell.
HESTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἑστία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHS-TEE-A(Classical Greek) HEHS-tee-ə(English)
Rating: 78% based on 19 votes
Derived from Greek ἑστία (hestia) meaning "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.
HESTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: HEHS-tər(English)
Rating: 47% based on 46 votes
Latin form of ESTHER. Like Esther, it has been used in England since the Protestant Reformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne used it for the heroine of his novel The Scarlet Letter (1850), Hester Prynne, a Puritan woman forced to wear a red letter A on her chest after giving birth to a child out of wedlock.
HESPEROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἕσπερος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Means "evening" in Greek. This was the name of the personification of the Evening Star (the planet Venus) in Greek mythology.
HESPERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Spanish
Other Scripts: Ἑσπερια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: hes-PEER-ee-ə(Greek Mythology)
Rating: 88% based on 4 votes
Derived from Greek hesperos "evening" (see HESPEROS). In Greek myth this was the name of one of the three Hesperides, goddesses of the evening and sunsets. Hesperia was also a Greek name of Italy, meaning "the land where the sun sets" (as in the case of asteroid 69 Hesperia).
HERMIONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἑρμιόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHR-MEE-O-NEH(Classical Greek) hər-MIE-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 77% based on 59 votes
Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play The Winter's Tale (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
HEPHZIBAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: חֶפְצִי־בָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: HEHF-zi-bə(English) HEHP-zi-bə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 20 votes
Means "my delight is in her" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the wife of King Hezekiah of Judah and the mother of Manasseh.
HENRIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish
Pronounced: hehn-ree-EHT-ə(English) HEHN-ree-eht-taw(Hungarian) HEHN-ree-eht-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 58% based on 54 votes
Latinate form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form that was initially more popular.
HELMUT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HEHL-moot(German)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic element helm "helmet" or heil "healthy" combined with muot "spirit, mind".
HELGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic, German, Dutch, Finnish, Hungarian, Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Pronounced: HEHL-ga(German) HEHL-gaw(Hungarian)
Rating: 38% based on 52 votes
Feminine form of HELGE.
HELEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ἑλένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHL-ən(English)
Rating: 73% based on 53 votes
English form of the Greek Ἑλένη (Helene), probably from Greek ἑλένη (helene) meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σελήνη (selene) meaning "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.

The name was originally used among early Christians in honour of the saint, as opposed to the classical character. In England it was commonly spelled Ellen during the Middle Ages, and the spelling Helen was not regularly used until after the Renaissance. A famous bearer was Helen Keller (1880-1968), an American author and lecturer who was both blind and deaf.

HECATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑκάτη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHK-ə-tee(English)
Rating: 63% based on 19 votes
From the Greek Ἑκάτη (Hekate), possibly derived from ἑκάς (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
HAZELELPONI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: הַצְלֶלְפּוֹנִי‎‎(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 24% based on 11 votes
Means "shade coming upon me" in Hebrew. This is the name of a woman of the tribe of Judah mentioned in 1 Chronicles 4:8.
HANNELORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: HA-nə-lo-rə
Rating: 63% based on 15 votes
Combination of HANNE (1) and ELEONORE.
HANIFA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: حنيفة(Arabic)
Pronounced: ha-NEE-fah
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of HANIF.
HANEUL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Korean
Other Scripts: 하늘(Korean Hangul)
Pronounced: HA-NUL
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Means "heaven, sky" in Korean.
HALIMEDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἁλιμήδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: hal-i-MEE-dee
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
Means "to think of the sea" from the Greek element ἅλς (hals) "the sea" combined with μηδομαι (medomai) "to think on, to be mindful of". In Greek myth this was the name of one of the Nereids. A moon of Neptune is named after her.
HADEWYCH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: HAH-də-veekh, HAH-də-weekh
Rating: 30% based on 11 votes
Dutch form of HEDWIG.
GUSTAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Czech
Pronounced: GUYS-tav(Swedish) GUWS-taf(German) GOOS-taf(Czech)
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Possibly means "staff of the Geats", derived from the Old Norse elements gautr "Geat, Goth" and stafr "staff". However, the root name Gautstafr is not well attested in the Old Norse period. Alternatively, it might be derived from the Slavic name GOSTISLAV. This name has been borne by six kings of Sweden, including the 16th-century Gustav I Vasa.
GULRUKH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: گُلرخ(Urdu)
Rating: 24% based on 8 votes
Means "rose faced" in Persian. This was the name of a wife of the Mughal emperor Babur.
GUINEVERE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir(English)
Rating: 74% based on 47 votes
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar meaning "white phantom", ultimately from the Old Celtic roots *windos meaning "fair, white, blessed" (modern Welsh gwen) and *sebros meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

GUGULETHU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Xhosa, Zulu, Ndebele
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
From Xhosa, Zulu and Ndebele igugu "treasure, pride" and lethu "our".
GUDRUN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Pronounced: GOO-droon(German)
Rating: 28% based on 38 votes
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
GRISELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Literature
Pronounced: gri-ZEHL-də(English) gree-SEHL-da(Spanish)
Rating: 37% based on 48 votes
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
GRAŻYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: gra-ZHI-na
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "beautiful" in Lithuanian. This name was created by Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz for his poem Grażyna (1823).
GOLDIE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of GOLDA.
GOLDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: גאָלדאַ, גאָלדע(Yiddish) גּוֹלְדָּה(Hebrew)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From Yiddish גאָלד (gold) meaning "gold". This is the name of Tevye's wife in the musical Fiddler on the Roof (1964). It was also borne by the Israeli prime minister Golda Meir (1898-1978).
GIUDITTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: joo-DEET-ta
Rating: 43% based on 23 votes
Italian form of JUDITH.
GIORGIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JOR-ja
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Italian feminine form of GEORGE.
GINEVRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jee-NEH-vra
Rating: 65% based on 52 votes
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
GIACINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ja-CHEEN-ta
Rating: 43% based on 12 votes
Italian feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
GERTRUDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, French
Pronounced: GUR-trood(English) khər-TRUY-də(Dutch) ZHEHR-TRUYD(French)
Rating: 41% based on 50 votes
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play Hamlet (1600) for the mother of the title character. Another famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).
GERALDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHR-əl-deen
Rating: 54% based on 53 votes
Feminine form of GERALD. This name was created by the poet Henry Howard for use in a 1537 sonnet praising Lady Elizabeth FitzGerald, whom he terms The Geraldine.
GEORGETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHAWR-ZHEHT
Rating: 49% based on 40 votes
French feminine form of GEORGE.
GENOVEFA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized, ?) [1][2]
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Older form of GENEVIÈVE.
GAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαῖα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A(Classical Greek) GIE-ə(English) GAY-ə(English) GA-ya(Italian)
Rating: 69% based on 15 votes
From the Greek word γαῖα (gaia), a parallel form of γῆ (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
FREDERUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval German
Rating: 35% based on 15 votes
Medieval German form of FRIDERUN. This name was borne by the German-born first wife of king Charles III of France (10th century AD).
FREDERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FREHD-ə-rik, FREHD-rik
Rating: 71% based on 61 votes
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.

The Normans brought the name to England in the 11th century but it quickly died out. It was reintroduced by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century. A famous bearer was Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), an American ex-slave who became a leading advocate of abolition.

FREDERICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, English
Pronounced: fri-di-REE-ku(European Portuguese) freh-deh-REE-ku(Brazilian Portuguese) frehd-ə-REE-kə(English) frehd-REE-kə(English)
Rating: 46% based on 49 votes
Feminine form of FREDERICO or FREDERICK.
FRANCISQUE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FRAHN-SEESK
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
French variant of Franciscus (see FRANCIS), now somewhat archaic.
FRANCISCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Pronounced: fran-THEES-ka(European Spanish) fran-SEES-ka(Latin American Spanish) frun-SEESH-ku(Portuguese) frun-SEES-ku(Portuguese)
Rating: 59% based on 18 votes
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANCES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRAN-sis
Rating: 70% based on 58 votes
Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century [1]. A notable bearer was Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), a social worker and the first American to be canonized.
FLORIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: FLO-ryan(German) FLAW-RYAHN(French) FLAW-ryan(Polish)
Rating: 61% based on 51 votes
From the Roman cognomen Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. This was the name of a short-lived Roman emperor of the 3rd century. It was also borne by Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
FLORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: FLAWR-ə(English) FLO-ra(German, Spanish) FLAW-ru(Portuguese)
Rating: 74% based on 53 votes
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FLAVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: FLA-vya(Italian) FLA-bya(Spanish)
Rating: 49% based on 44 votes
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLAMINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian, German (Rare), Sicilian
Pronounced: fla-MEE-nya(Latin, Italian) flah-MIN-ee-ah(German)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of FLAMINIUS.
FIAMMETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Rating: 47% based on 40 votes
Derived from Italian fiamma meaning "flame" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FERN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FURN
Rating: 58% based on 52 votes
From the English word for the plant, ultimately from Old English fearn. It has been used as a given name since the late 19th century.
FERDINAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Dutch, English, Slovak, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: FEHR-dee-nant(German) FEHR-DEE-NAHN(French) FEHR-dee-nahnt(Dutch) FUR-də-nand(English) FEHR-dee-nand(Slovak) FEHR-di-nant(Czech)
Rating: 49% based on 48 votes
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FABIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: FA-byo
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish form of FABIUS.
EUSTACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 39% based on 47 votes
Feminine form of EUSTACE.
EUSTACE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: YOO-stis
Rating: 36% based on 48 votes
English form of EUSTACHIUS or EUSTATHIUS, two names of Greek origin that have been conflated in the post-classical period. Saint Eustace, who is known under both spellings, was a 2nd-century Roman general who became a Christian after seeing a vision of a cross between the antlers of a stag he was hunting. He was burned to death for refusing to worship the Roman gods and is now regarded as the patron saint of hunters. Due to him, this name was common in England during the Middle Ages, though it is presently rare.
EURYDICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εὐρυδίκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ew-RUY-dee-keh(Latin) yuw-RID-i-see(English)
Rating: 45% based on 46 votes
From the Greek Εὐρυδίκη (Eurydike) meaning "wide justice", derived from εὐρύς (eurys) meaning "wide" and δίκη (dike) meaning "justice". In Greek myth she was the wife of Orpheus. Her husband tried to rescue her from Hades, but he failed when he disobeyed the condition that he not look back upon her on their way out.
EUPHROSYNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὐφροσύνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FRAH-si-nee(English)
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Means "mirth, merriment" in Greek. She was one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites) in Greek mythology.
EUPHRASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Εὐπρασία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 39% based on 8 votes
Means "good cheer" in Greek.
EUPHEMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Εὐφημία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEE-mee-ə(English)
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek εὐφημέω (euphemeo), a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and φημί (phemi) meaning "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
EUNIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish (Rare)
Pronounced: ew-NYEE-ka
Rating: 34% based on 7 votes
Polish form of EUNICE.
EULALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: UU-LA-LEE
Rating: 65% based on 47 votes
French form of EULALIA.
EULALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Εὐλαλία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ew-LA-lya(Spanish) yoo-LAY-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 58% based on 47 votes
Derived from Greek εὔλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and λαλέω (laleo) meaning "to talk". This was the name of an early 4th-century saint and martyr from Merida in Spain. She is a patron saint of Barcelona.
EUGÉNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: UU-ZHEH-NEE
Rating: 64% based on 52 votes
French form of EUGENIA. This was the name of the wife of Napoleon III.
EUGENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εὐγένεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ew-JEH-nya(Italian) ew-KHEH-nya(Spanish) eh-oo-JEH-nee-a(Romanian) ew-GEH-nya(Polish) yoo-JEE-nee-ə(English) yoo-JEEN-yə(English)
Rating: 48% based on 50 votes
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man. The name was occasionally found in England during the Middle Ages, but it was not regularly used until the 19th century.
EUFROSINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Romanian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Belarusian
Other Scripts: Еўфрасіння(Belarusian)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish form and Belarusian variant transcription of EUPHROSYNE.
EUDORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὐδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 51% based on 47 votes
Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.
EUDOCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εὐδοκία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Εὐδοκία (Eudokia), derived from the word εὐδοκέω (eudokeo) meaning "to be well pleased, to be satisfied", itself derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and δοκέω (dokeo) meaning "to think, to imagine, to suppose". This name was common among Byzantine royalty. Saint Eudocia was the wife of the 5th-century emperor Theodosius II.
ETHELINDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval German
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
German form of ETHELINDA. Ethelinde of Northeim was the oldest daughter of Otto of Northeim, duke of Bavaria (r.1060-1070).
ETHELDREDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
ETHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ETH-əl
Rating: 47% based on 41 votes
Short form of names beginning with the Old English element æðel meaning "noble". It was coined in the 19th century, when many Old English names were revived. It was popularized by the novels The Newcomes (1855) by William Makepeace Thackeray and The Daisy Chain (1856) by C. M. Yonge. A famous bearer was American actress and singer Ethel Merman (1908-1984).
ESMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHZ-mənd
Rating: 57% based on 15 votes
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
ERZSÉBET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: EHR-zheh-beht
Rating: 45% based on 45 votes
Hungarian form of ELIZABETH. This is the native name of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. It was also borne by the infamous Erzsébet Báthory, a 16th-century countess and murderer.
ERNESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, English
Pronounced: EHR-NEHS-TEEN(French) ehr-nehs-TEE-nə(German) UR-nis-teen(English)
Rating: 39% based on 46 votes
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ERNEST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Catalan, Polish
Pronounced: UR-nist(English) EHR-NEST(French) ər-NEST(Catalan) EHR-nest(Polish)
Rating: 50% based on 50 votes
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "serious". It was introduced to England by the German House of Hanover when they inherited the British throne in the 18th century, though it did not become common until the following century. The American author and adventurer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was a famous bearer of the name. It was also used by Oscar Wilde for a character in his comedy The Importance of Being Earnest (1895).
ERMENGARDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English
Rating: 41% based on 24 votes
Variant of IRMINGARD, used in English.
ERCOLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: EHR-ko-leh
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Italian form of HERCULES.
ERATO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἐρατώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-RA-TAW(Classical Greek) EHR-ə-to(English)
Rating: 35% based on 14 votes
Means "lovely" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, the muse of lyric poetry.
ERASMUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἔρασμος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-RAZ-məs(English)
Rating: 43% based on 15 votes
Derived from Greek ἐράσμιος (erasmios) meaning "beloved". Saint Erasmus, also known as Saint Elmo, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus was also the name of a Dutch scholar of the Renaissance period.
ENID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: EH-nid(Welsh)
Rating: 39% based on 39 votes
Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.
ENDELIENTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of an unknown Celtic name, possibly Welsh Cenheidlon or Cynheiddon. This was the name of a 5th- or 6th-century Cornish saint whose birth name is lost. According to tradition she was a Welsh princess, daughter of King Brychan, who went to Cornwall as a Christian missionary.
ELŻBIETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: elzh-BYEH-ta
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Polish form of ELIZABETH.
ELVIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Russian
Other Scripts: Эльвира(Russian)
Pronounced: ehl-BEE-ra(Spanish) ehl-VEE-ra(Italian)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Spanish form of a Visigothic name, possibly composed of the Germanic elements ala "all" and wer "true". This is the name of a character in Mozart's opera Don Giovanni (1787).
ELOISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-lo-EE-za
Rating: 64% based on 17 votes
Italian form of ELOISE.
ELİF
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 41% based on 11 votes
Turkish form of Alif, the name of the first letter of the Arabic alphabet, ا. It also means "slender", from the Turkish phrase elif gibi, literally "shaped like elif".
ELFRIEDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ehl-FREE-də
Rating: 41% based on 14 votes
German form of ELFREDA.
ELFRIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELEUTHERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of ELEUTHERIUS.
ÉLEUTHÈRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: E-LUU-TER
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
French form of ELEUTHERIUS. A famous bearer of this name was French-born American industrialist Eleuthère Irénée du Pont (1771-1834).
ELETTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-LEHT-tra
Rating: 56% based on 16 votes
Italian form of ELECTRA.
ELEKTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἠλέκτρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-LEHK-TRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Greek form of ELECTRA.
EGLANTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHG-lən-tien, EHG-lən-teen
Rating: 41% based on 49 votes
From the English word for the flower also known as sweetbrier. It is derived via Old French from Vulgar Latin *aquilentum meaning "prickly". It was early used as a given name (in the form Eglentyne) in Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th-century story The Prioress's Tale.
EEFJE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: AYF-yə
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of EEF.
EDWINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehd-WEEN-ə, ehd-WIN-ə
Rating: 47% based on 20 votes
Feminine form of EDWIN.
EDWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EHD-win(English) EHT-vin(Dutch)
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
Means "rich friend", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman Conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
EDVIGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Slavic, Romanian (Rare), Moldovan (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Portuguese (African, Rare)
Rating: 47% based on 9 votes
Cognate of HEDWIG.
EDMOND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EHD-MAWN
Rating: 54% based on 48 votes
French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
EDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: EE-dith(English) EH-dit(German, Swedish)
Rating: 63% based on 57 votes
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
EDELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French, English, Various
Pronounced: ED-ə-lien(German, English) ed-ə-LEEN(German, English) ED-ə-lin(German, English) ED-ə-LIEN(French) ED-ə-LEEN(French) ED-ə-LIN(French)
Rating: 50% based on 12 votes
Cognate of ADELINE. It was borne by Edeline Thweng, a 14th-century heiress of Ripley Castle in North Yorkshire, England. Allegedly it was not popular as an English name before 1830, until then primarily German and French in usage. The Edeline Islands of Western Australia are named for Lady Edeline Sackville-West (1870–1918), the wife of Gerald Strickland, 1st Baron Strickland.
DRUSILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: droo-SIL-ə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 46 votes
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DRUSUS. In Acts in the New Testament Drusilla is the wife of Felix.
DRAGOMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Драгомир(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
DOROTHY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee
Rating: 71% based on 56 votes
Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and several of its sequels.
DOROTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, English, Late Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Δωροθέα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: do-ro-TEH-a(German) dawr-ə-THEE-ə(English)
Rating: 67% based on 54 votes
Feminine form of the Late Greek name Δωρόθεος (Dorotheos), which meant "gift of God" from Greek δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift" and θεός (theos) meaning "god". The name Theodore is composed of the same elements in reverse order. Dorothea was the name of two early saints, notably the 4th-century martyr Dorothea of Caesarea. It was also borne by the 14th-century Saint Dorothea of Montau, who was the patron saint of Prussia.
DORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Croatian, Serbian, Dutch
Other Scripts: Ντόρα(Greek) Дора(Serbian)
Pronounced: DAWR-ə(English) DO-ra(Spanish, Croatian, Serbian)
Rating: 39% based on 43 votes
Short form of DOROTHY, THEODORA or ISIDORA.
DOMITILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DAW-MEE-TEE
Rating: 37% based on 41 votes
French form of DOMITILLA.
DOMITILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: do-mee-TEEL-la(Italian)
Rating: 49% based on 14 votes
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian.
DIDO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: DEE-do(Latin) DIE-do(English)
Rating: 34% based on 27 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly "virgin" in Phoenician. Dido, also called Elissa, was the queen of Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid. She burned herself to death after Aeneas left her.
DIANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, English (Rare)
Pronounced: die-AN-thə(English)
Rating: 71% based on 26 votes
From dianthus, the name of a type of flower (ultimately from Greek meaning "heavenly flower").
DESIDERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: deh-see-DHEH-rya(Spanish)
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of DESIDERIO. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.
DELPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DEHL-FEEN
Rating: 69% based on 7 votes
French form of DELPHINA.
CYRIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: SIR-əl(English) SEE-REEL(French) TSI-ril(Czech)
Rating: 54% based on 25 votes
From the Greek name Κύριλλος (Kyrillos), which was derived from Greek κύριος (kyrios) meaning "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.

This name was borne by a number of important saints, including Cyril of Jerusalem, a 4th-century bishop and Doctor of the Church, and Cyril of Alexandria, a 5th-century theologian. Another Saint Cyril was a 9th-century linguist and a Greek missionary to the Slavs. The Cyrillic alphabet, which is still used today, was created by him and his brother Methodius in order to translate the Bible into Slavic, and thus this name has been especially popular in Eastern Christianity. It came into general use in England in the 19th century.

CYPRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: TSI-pryan(Polish) SIP-ree-ən(English)
Rating: 60% based on 28 votes
From the Roman family name Cyprianus, which meant "from Cyprus". Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.
CYBELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology (Latinized)
Pronounced: SIB-ə-lee(English)
Rating: 58% based on 46 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly from Phrygian roots meaning either "stone" or "hair". This was the name of the Phrygian mother goddess associated with fertility and nature. She was later worshipped by the Greeks and Romans.
CUTHBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KUTH-bərt
Rating: 42% based on 20 votes
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
CRISPIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-pin
Rating: 61% based on 47 votes
From the Roman cognomen Crispinus, which was derived from the name CRISPUS. Saint Crispin was a 3rd-century Roman who was martyred with his twin brother Crispinian in Gaul. They are the patrons of shoemakers. They were popular saints in England during the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
CRESSIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KREHS-i-də(English)
Rating: 64% based on 43 votes
Medieval form of CHRYSEIS. Various medieval tales describe her as a woman of Troy, daughter of Calchus, who leaves her Trojan lover Troilus for the Greek hero Diomedes. Shakespeare's play Troilus and Cressida (1602) was based on these tales.
CRESCENTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare), Late Roman
Rating: 61% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of CRESCENTIUS. Saint Crescentia was a 4th-century companion of Saint Vitus. This is also the name of the eponymous heroine of a 12th-century German romance.
COSMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: KAHZ-mo(English)
Rating: 44% based on 51 votes
Italian variant of COSIMO. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
COSIMO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KAW-zee-mo
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
Italian form of COSMAS. A famous bearer was Cosimo de' Medici, the 15th-century founder of Medici rule in Florence, who was a patron of the Renaissance and a successful merchant. Other members of the Medici family have also borne this name.
COSIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KAW-zee-ma
Rating: 72% based on 9 votes
Italian feminine form of COSIMO.
CORNELIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Pronounced: kawr-NEE-lee-əs(English) kawr-NEH-lee-uys(Dutch) kawr-NEH-lyuws(German)
Rating: 51% based on 48 votes
Roman family name that possibly derives from the Latin element cornu meaning "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
CORNELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: kawr-NEH-lya(German) kor-NEH-lya(Italian) kawr-NEH-lee-a(Dutch) kawr-NEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 56% based on 55 votes
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CORISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, French
Rating: 62% based on 28 votes
Meaning uncertain, from the name of a character in medieval legend, possibly first recorded by Spanish writer Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo. Perhaps it was derived from an older form of Spanish corazón "heart" (e.g., Old Spanish coraçon; ultimately from Latin cor "heart", with the hypothetic Vulgar Latin root *coratione, *coraceone) or the Greek name CHRYSANTHE. As a nickname it was used by a mistress of King Henry IV of France: Diane d'Andoins (1554-1620), la Belle Corisande. Some usage may be generated by Jean-Baptiste Lully's opera 'Amadis' (1684; based on Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo), in which it belongs to the lover of the prince Florestan. The name was also used by Benjamin Disraeli for a character in his play 'Lothair' (1870).
CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
Rating: 76% based on 60 votes
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play King Lear (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.
CONSUELO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kon-SWEH-lo
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Means "consolation" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Consuelo, meaning "Our Lady of Consolation".
CONSTANTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 51% based on 13 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Constantius, which was itself derived from CONSTANS.
CONSTANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: KAHN-stəns(English) KAWNS-TAHNS(French)
Rating: 59% based on 54 votes
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CLOTILDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Pronounced: KLAW-TEELD(French)
Rating: 61% based on 17 votes
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda, which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
CLOTILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: klə-TIL-də
Rating: 40% based on 47 votes
English form of CLOTILDE.
CLIO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Κλειώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLEE-o(Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 44 votes
Latinized form of KLEIO.
CLEMENTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: kleh-mehn-TEE-na(Italian, Spanish) kli-mehn-TEE-nu(European Portuguese) kleh-mehn-CHEE-nu(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 42% based on 50 votes
Feminine form of CLEMENT.
CLEMENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHM-ənt
Rating: 54% based on 20 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
CLEMENCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLEH-mən-see, KLEH-mənt-see
Rating: 45% based on 12 votes
Medieval variant of CLEMENCE. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
CLELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 51% based on 18 votes
Italian form of CLOELIA.
CLARICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: klə-REES, KLAR-is, KLEHR-is
Rating: 57% based on 51 votes
Medieval vernacular form of the Late Latin name Claritia, which was a derivative of CLARA.
CELESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHL-ə-steen
Rating: 67% based on 20 votes
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CELESTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: theh-lehs-TEE-na(European Spanish) seh-lehs-TEE-na(Latin American Spanish) cheh-leh-STEE-na(Italian)
Rating: 63% based on 12 votes
Latinate feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CELANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-ən-deen, SEHL-ən-dien
Rating: 54% based on 38 votes
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδών (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
CECILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHS-ə-lee
Rating: 82% based on 9 votes
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CÉCILE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-SEEL
Rating: 67% based on 52 votes
French form of CECILIA.
CASSANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κάσσανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 53% based on 24 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κάσσανδρος (Kassandros), the masculine form of CASSANDRA. This was the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Macedon.
CASIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: KAZ-i-meer(English) KA-ZEE-MEER(French)
Rating: 53% based on 32 votes
English form of the Polish name Kazimierz, derived from the Slavic element kaziti "to destroy" combined with miru "peace, world". Four kings of Poland have borne this name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the Polish state in the 14th century. It was also borne Saint Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and Lithuania. The name was imported into Western Europe via Germany, where it was borne by some royalty.
CARLOTTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: kar-LOT-ta
Rating: 65% based on 8 votes
Italian form of CHARLOTTE.
CAPUCINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KA-PUY-SEEN
Rating: 47% based on 13 votes
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
CALLISTO (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιστώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIS-to(English)
Rating: 58% based on 26 votes
Latinized form of KALLISTO. A moon of Jupiter bears this name.
BRYNHILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Rating: 51% based on 12 votes
Norwegian form of BRYNHILDR.
BRUNHILDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: broon-HIL-də
Rating: 38% based on 46 votes
Newer German form of BRÜNHILD.
BRIONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ə-nee
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Variant of BRYONY.
BOUDICCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Pronounced: BOO-di-kə(English)
Rating: 49% based on 19 votes
Derived from Brythonic boud meaning "victory". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Iceni who led the Britons in revolt against the Romans. Eventually her forces were defeated and she committed suicide. Her name is first recorded in Roman histories, as Boudicca by Tacitus [1] and Βουδουῖκα (Boudouika) by Cassius Dio [2].
BOGDANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Slovene, Romanian, Polish, Serbian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Богдана(Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: bawg-DA-na(Polish)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of BOGDAN.
BISERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Бисера(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Derived from the South Slavic word бисер (biser) meaning "pearl" (ultimately of Arabic origin).
BIBIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: bee-BYA-na(Spanish, Italian)
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Possibly an early variant of VIVIANA. Alternatively, it may be a feminine derivative of the earlier Roman cognomen VIBIANUS.
BETSABEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: bet-sah-BE-ah
Rating: 47% based on 7 votes
Italian form of BATHSHEBA.
BETONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BEHT-nee, BEHT-ə-nee
Rating: 39% based on 16 votes
From the name of the minty medicinal herb.
BETHSABÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: BET-SAH-BAY
Rating: 33% based on 28 votes
French form of BATHSHEBA.
BERTRAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: BEHR-TRAHN(French) BUR-trənd(English)
Rating: 44% based on 16 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with BERTRAM and the two names have merged to some degree. A famous bearer was English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
BERTRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: BUR-trəm(English) BEHR-tram(German)
Rating: 50% based on 49 votes
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play All's Well That Ends Well (1603).
BERTILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 33% based on 39 votes
French diminutive of BERTHA.
BERNARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: bər-NAHRD(American English) BU-nəd(British English) BEHR-NAR(French) BEHR-nahrt(Dutch) BEHR-nart(Polish, Croatian, Czech)
Rating: 51% based on 47 votes
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERNADETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: BEHR-NA-DEHT(French) bər-nə-DEHT(English)
Rating: 52% based on 53 votes
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.
BERENICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Βερενίκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: bər-NEES(English) behr-ə-NIE-see(English) behr-ə-NEE-see(English) beh-reh-NEE-cheh(Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 29 votes
Latinized form of Βερενίκη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενίκη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φέρω (phero) meaning "to bring" and νίκη (nike) meaning "victory". This name was common among the Ptolemy ruling family of Egypt, a dynasty that was originally from Macedon. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament (in most English Bibles it is spelled Bernice) belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II. As an English name, Berenice came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
BEOWULF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Pronounced: BAY-ə-wuwlf(English)
Rating: 50% based on 13 votes
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". Alternatively, the first element may be beadu "battle". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem Beowulf. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of King Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
BENEDICT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHN-ə-dikt
Rating: 61% based on 20 votes
From the Late Latin name Benedictus, which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American general Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who defected to Britain during the American Revolution.
BENEDETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: beh-neh-DEHT-ta
Rating: 62% based on 29 votes
Italian feminine form of BENEDICT.
BEATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: beh-a-TREE-cheh(Italian) BEE-ə-tris(English) BEET-ris(English) BEH-ah-trees(Swedish) beh-ah-TREES(Swedish)
Rating: 75% based on 64 votes
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the Divine Comedy (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BEATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: beh-A-ta(Polish, German)
Rating: 43% based on 35 votes
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
BATHSHEBA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: בַּת־שֶׁבַע(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: bath-SHEE-bə(English)
Rating: 37% based on 18 votes
Means "daughter of the oath" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a woman married to Uriah the Hittite. King David seduced her and made her pregnant, so he arranged to have her husband killed in battle and then married her. She was the mother of Solomon.
BARTOLOMEO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: bar-to-lo-MEH-o
Rating: 60% based on 10 votes
Italian form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTHOLOMEW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: bahr-THAHL-ə-myoo(English)
Rating: 48% based on 44 votes
English form of Βαρθολομαῖος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of TALMAI". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.
BARNABY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: BAHR-nə-bee
Rating: 51% based on 54 votes
Medieval English form of BARNABAS.
BARNABAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare), English (Rare), Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Βαρναβᾶς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: BAR-na-bas(German) BAHR-nə-bəs(English)
Rating: 47% based on 51 votes
Greek form of an Aramaic name. In Acts in the New Testament the byname Barnabas was given to a man named Joseph, a Jew from Cyprus who was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys. The original Aramaic form is unattested, but it may be from בּר נביא (bar naviya') meaning "son of the prophet", though in Acts 4:36 it is claimed that the name means "son of encouragement".

As an English name, Barnabas came into occasional use after the 12th century. It is now rare, though the variant Barnaby is still moderately common in Britain.

BARBARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Pronounced: BAHR-bə-rə(English) BAHR-brə(English) BAR-BA-RA(French) BAR-ba-ra(German) bar-BA-ra(Polish) BAWR-baw-raw(Hungarian)
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Derived from Greek βάρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BALTHAZAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: BAL-thə-zahr(English)
Rating: 52% based on 16 votes
Variant of BELSHAZZAR. Balthazar is the name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who visited the newborn Jesus. He was said to have come from Arabia.
AZAZEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֲזָאזֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "scapegoat" in Hebrew. This is the name of the recipient of a sacrificial goat in the Old Testament. The identity of Azazel is not clear; it may in fact be the name of the place where the goat is to be sacrificed, or it may be the name of some sort of evil desert demon.
AUSTĖJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Means "to weave" in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of bees.
AURORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-RAWR
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
French form of AURORA.
AUGUSTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, English, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ow-GOOS-ta(Italian) ə-GUS-tə(English) ow-GUWS-ta(German)
Rating: 59% based on 55 votes
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AUBERON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: O-bər-ahn
Rating: 51% based on 24 votes
Norman French derivative of a Germanic name, probably ALBERICH.
ATHANASE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Rating: 38% based on 13 votes
French form of ATHANASIUS.
ATALANTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀταλάντη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 9 votes
From the Greek Ἀταλάντη (Atalante) meaning "equal in weight", derived from ἀτάλαντος (atalantos), a word related to τάλαντον (talanton) meaning "a scale, a balance". In Greek legend she was a fast-footed maiden who refused to marry anyone who could not beat her in a race. She was eventually defeated by Hippomenes, who dropped three golden apples during the race causing her to stop to pick them up.
ASPASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀσπασία(Ancient Greek) Ασπασία(Greek)
Pronounced: A-SPA-SEE-A(Classical Greek)
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Derived from Greek ἀσπάσιος (aspasios) meaning "welcome, embrace". This was the name of the lover of Pericles (5th century BC).
ARTEMISIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀρτεμισία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 63% based on 52 votes
Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
ARTEMIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἄρτεμις(Ancient Greek) Άρτεμις(Greek)
Pronounced: AR-TEH-MEES(Classical Greek) AHR-tə-mis(English)
Rating: 71% based on 17 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek ἀρτεμής (artemes) meaning "safe" or ἄρταμος (artamos) meaning "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.
ARNAUDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: AR-NOD
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of ARNOLD.
ARKADY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аркадий(Russian)
Pronounced: ur-KA-dyee
Rating: 61% based on 9 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Аркадий (see ARKADIY).
ARETHUSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀρέθουσα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
From Greek Ἀρέθουσα (Arethousa) meaning "quick water", which is possibly derived from ἄρδω (ardo) meaning "water" and θοός (thoos) meaning "quick, nimble". This was the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who was transformed into a fountain.
ARCHIBALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: AHR-chi-bawld
Rating: 39% based on 53 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements ercan "genuine" and bald "bold". The first element was altered due to the influence of Greek names beginning with the element ἀρχός (archos) meaning "master". The Normans brought this name to England. It first became common in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
ARCANGELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 41% based on 14 votes
Feminine form of ARCANGELO.
ARCADIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀρκάδιος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Latinized form of ARKADIOS.
ARAMINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 63% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy The Old Bachelor (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy The Confederacy (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.
ARACHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀράχνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-RA-KNEH(Classical Greek) ə-RAK-nee(English)
Rating: 38% based on 13 votes
Means "spider" in Greek. In Greek myth Arachne was a mortal woman who defeated Athena in a weaving contest. After this Arachne hanged herself, but Athena brought her back to life in the form of a spider.
APOLLINARIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аполлинария(Russian)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Russian feminine form of APOLLINARIS.
ANTONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian, Greek, Croatian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Αντωνία(Greek) Антония(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: an-TO-nya(Italian, Spanish, German) an-TO-nee-ə(English) ahn-TO-nee-a(Dutch)
Rating: 69% based on 51 votes
Feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTIGONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀντιγόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: an-TIG-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 52% based on 57 votes
Derived from Greek ἀντί (anti) meaning "against, compared to, like" and γονή (gone) meaning "birth, offspring". In Greek legend Antigone was the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta. King Creon of Thebes declared that her slain brother Polynices was to remain unburied, a great dishonour. She disobeyed and gave him a proper burial, and for this she was sealed alive in a cave.
ANTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἄνθεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-thee-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 54 votes
From the Greek Ἄνθεια (Antheia), derived from ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Hera.
ANSELM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AN-zelm(German) AN-selm(English)
Rating: 46% based on 48 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.
ANNUNZIATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: an-noon-TSYA-ta
Rating: 49% based on 13 votes
Means "announced" in Italian, referring to the event in the New Testament in which the angel Gabriel tells the Virgin Mary of the imminent birth of Jesus.
ANEMONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-NEHM-ə-nee
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
From the name of the anemone flower, which is derived from Greek ἄνεμος (anemos) meaning "wind".
ANDROMACHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀνδρομάχη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MA-KEH(Classical Greek)
Rating: 33% based on 16 votes
Derived from the Greek elements ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) and μάχη (mache) meaning "battle". In Greek legend she was the wife of the Trojan hero Hector. After the fall of Troy Neoptolemus killed her son Astyanax and took her as a concubine.
ANATOLE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-NA-TAWL
Rating: 39% based on 20 votes
French form of ANATOLIUS.
AMYAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 58% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of AMIS. Alternatively, it may come from a surname that originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
AMBROSINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: am-BRO-zeen
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of AMBROSE.
AMBROSE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AM-broz
Rating: 64% based on 54 votes
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Ἀμβρόσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.
AMARYLLIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: am-ə-RIL-is(English)
Rating: 56% based on 56 votes
Derived from Greek ἀμαρύσσω (amarysso) meaning "to sparkle". This was the name of a heroine in Virgil's epic poem Eclogues [1]. The amaryllis flower is named for her.
ALOYSIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-o-ISH-əs
Rating: 48% based on 53 votes
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.
ALOISIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: a-lo-EE-zee-a
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
German feminine form of ALOYSIUS.
ALOIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Czech
Pronounced: A-lois
Rating: 50% based on 15 votes
German and Czech form of ALOYSIUS.
ALMA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: AL-mə(English) AL-ma(Spanish)
Rating: 79% based on 11 votes
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
ALGERNON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-jər-nən
Rating: 48% based on 58 votes
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy).
ALFREDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish (Rare), German (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: al-FREE-də(English) al-FREH-da(Polish, German, Italian)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of ALFRED.
ALBERTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AL-BEHR-TEEN
Rating: 40% based on 61 votes
French feminine form of ALBERT.
ALBERTE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Danish
Pronounced: AL-BEHRT(French)
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
French and Danish feminine form of ALBERT.
ALBERIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Germanic Mythology
Rating: 53% based on 11 votes
Variant of ALBERICH.
AGNES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἁγνή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AG-nis(English) AK-nəs(German) AHKH-nehs(Dutch) ANG-nehs(Swedish)
Rating: 66% based on 80 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἁγνή (Hagne), derived from Greek ἁγνός (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.

As an English name it was highly popular from the Middle Ages until the 17th century. It was revived in the 19th century and was common into the 20th, but it fell into decline after the 1930s. It last appeared on the American top 1000 rankings in 1972.

AGLAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀγλαΐα(Ancient Greek) Αγλαΐα(Greek)
Pronounced: ə-GLIE-ə(English)
Rating: 57% based on 15 votes
Means "splendour, beauty" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites). This name was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Rome.
AGATHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀγαθή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AG-ə-thə(English)
Rating: 69% based on 76 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀγαθή (Agathe), derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
ADRIANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: a-dree-A-no(Italian)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Italian and Portuguese form of ADRIAN.
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