Names Categorized "fire emblem characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include fire emblem characters.
Filter Results     
more options...
ABEL   m   English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) or הָבֶל (Havel) which meant "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
AMELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
AMY   f   English
English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.
ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ARRAN   m   Scottish
From the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland in the Firth of Clyde.
ASTRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
ATHENA   f   Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown, perhaps derived from Greek αθηρ (ather) "sharp" and αινη (aine) "praise". Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare, the daughter of Zeus and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. She is associated with the olive tree and the owl.
ATLAS   m   Greek Mythology
Possibly means "enduring" from Greek τλαω (tlao) meaning "to endure". In Greek mythology he was a Titan punished by Zeus by being forced to support the heavens on his shoulders.
AZURA   f   English (Rare)
Elaboration of AZURE.
BASILIO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of BASIL (1).
BASTIAN   m   German
Short form of SEBASTIAN.
BENNY   m   English
Diminutive of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT.
BLAKE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BOYD   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was possibly derived from the name of the island of Bute.
BRADY   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of BRÁDACH".
BRENDAN   m   Irish, English
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRUNO   m   German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
BRYCE   m   English
Variant of BRICE.
CAESAR   m   Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen which possibly meant "hairy", from Latin caesaries "hair". Julius Caesar and his adopted son Julius Caesar Octavianus (commonly known as Augustus) were both rulers of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC. Caesar was used as a title by the emperors that came after them.
CAIN   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CASSIUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin cassus "empty, vain". This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016), who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay (1810-1903).
CASTOR   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Καστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κεκαστο). In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
CECILIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CLAIR   m   French, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
CLIVE   m   English
From a surname meaning "cliff" in Old English, originally belonging to a person who lived near a cliff.
COLM   m   Irish
Variant of COLUM.
CONRAD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CORD   m   German
German contracted form of CONRAD.
CORDELIA   f   English
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play 'King Lear' (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.
CORMAG   m   Scottish
Scottish form of CORMAC.
CYNTHIA   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυνθια (Kynthia) which means "woman from Kynthos". This was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because Kynthos was the mountain on Delos on which she and her twin brother Apollo were born. It was not used as a given name until the Renaissance, and it did not become common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century.
DALTON   m   English
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was John Dalton (1766-1844), the English chemist and physicist who theorized about the existence of atoms.
DARA (2)   f & m   Khmer
Means "star" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.
DARIN   m   English
Variant of DARREN. This was the adopted surname of the singer Bobby Darin (1936-1973), who was born Robert Cassotto and chose his stage name from a street sign.
DEIRDRE   f   English, Irish, Irish Mythology
From the older Gaelic form Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from a Celtic word meaning "woman". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobhar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.... [more]
DOLPH   m   English
Short form of ADOLPH.
DRACO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon) which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
EDWARD   m   English, Polish
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.... [more]
EFFIE (1)   f   English (Archaic)
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA.
ELBERT   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of ADELBERT.
ELEANORA   f   English
Latinate form of ELEANOR.
ELENA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, German, Medieval Slavic
Cognate of HELEN, and a variant transcription of Russian YELENA.
ENA (1)   f   Irish
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
EPHRAIM   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אֶפְרָיִם ('Efrayim) which meant "fruitful". In the Old Testament Ephraim is a son of Joseph and Asenath and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ETZEL   m   Germanic Mythology
Form of ATTILA used in the medieval German saga the 'Nibelungenlied'. In the story Etzel is a fictional version of Attila the Hun.
EWAN   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
EZRA   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.
FAE   f   English
Variant of FAY.
FAYE   f   English
Variant of FAY.
FELICIA   f   English, Spanish, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Latin name Felicius, a derivative of FELIX. In England, it has occasionally been used since the Middle Ages.
FERNAND   m   French
French form of FERDINAND.
FIONA   f   Scottish, English
Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).
FLAVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLORA   f   English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FLORINA   f   Romanian, Spanish, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of FLORINUS.
FORREST   m   English
From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877). This name was borne by the title character in the movie 'Forrest Gump' (1994) about a loveable simpleton. Use of the name increased when the movie was released, but has since faded away.
FRANZ   m   German
German form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). This name was borne by the influential author Franz Kafka (1883-1924), writer of 'The Trial' and 'The Castle' among other works. Also, rulers of Austria and the Holy Roman Empire have had this name.
FREDERICK   m   English
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.... [more]
FREY   m   Norse Mythology
Variant of FREYR.
GAIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman praenomen, or given name, of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from Latin gaudere "to rejoice", though it may be of unknown Etruscan origin. This was a very common Roman praenomen, the most famous bearers being Gaius Julius Caesar, the great leader of the Roman Republic, and his adopted son Gaius Octavius (later known as Augustus), the first Roman emperor. This name also appears in the New Testament belonging to a bishop of Ephesus who is regarded as a saint.
GALLUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman family name which meant "rooster" in Latin. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint, a companion of Saint Columbanus, who later became a hermit in Switzerland.
GARETH   m   Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".
GARRICK   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".
GAWAIN   m   Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Meaning uncertain, from the Latin form Walganus used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth. This was the name of a nephew of King Arthur and one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. He can be identified with the earlier Welsh hero Gwalchmei, and it is likely that the name derives from GWALCHMEI. Alternatively it may have a different Celtic or even a Germanic origin. Gawain was a popular hero in medieval stories such as the 14th-century romantic poem 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'.
GEOFFREY   m   English, French
From a Norman French form of a Germanic name. The second element is Germanic frid "peace", but the first element may be either gawia "territory", walha "foreign" or gisil "hostage". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. In the later Middle Ages Geoffrey was further confused with the distinct name Godfrey.... [more]
GLEN   m   Scottish, English
Variant of GLENN.
GRAY   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GREGOR   m   German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of GREGORY. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
GUNTER   m   German
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GUY   m   English, French
Norman French form of WIDO. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels 'Guy Mannering' (1815) by Sir Walter Scott and 'The Heir of Redclyffe' (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
GWENDOLYN   f   Welsh, English
Variant of GWENDOLEN.
HALCYON   f   Various
From the name of a genus of kingfisher birds, derived from Greek αλκυων (from the same source as Alcyone).
HANA (3)   f   Japanese
From Japanese (hana) or (hana) which both mean "flower". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HAYATO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (haya) meaning "falcon" and (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also make up this name.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HEATH   m   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series 'The Big Valley'.
HEATHER   f   English
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.
HECTOR   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.... [more]
HENRY   m   English
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".... [more]
HESTIA   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek ‘εστια (hestia) "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.
HINATA   f & m   Japanese
From Japanese 日向 (hinata) meaning "sunny place", 陽向 (hinata) meaning "toward the sun", or a non-standard reading of 向日葵 (himawari) meaning "sunflower". Other kanji compounds are also possible. Because of the irregular readings, this name is often written ひなた using the hiragana writing system.
HORACE   m   English, French
English and French form of HORATIUS, and the name by which the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus is commonly known those languages. In the modern era it has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, in honour of the poet.
IGNATIUS   m   Late Roman
From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.
IKE   m   English
Diminutive of ISAAC. This was the nickname of the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), based on the initial sound of his surname.
INNES   m & f   Scottish
Anglicized form of AONGHUS, also used as a feminine name.
ISADORA   f   English
Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).
JAFFAR   m   Arabic
Variant transcription of JAFAR.
JAKE   m   English
Medieval variant of JACK. It is also sometimes used as a short form of JACOB.
JAMIL   m   Arabic
Means "beautiful" in Arabic.
JEROME   m   English
From the Greek name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name", derived from ‘ιερος (hieros) "sacred" and ονομα (onoma) "name". Saint Jerome was responsible for the creation of the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible, in the 5th century. He is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. The name was used in his honour in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy and France, and has been used in England since the 12th century.
JESSE   m   English, Dutch, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishay) which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
JILL   f   English
Short form of GILLIAN.
JOSHUA   m   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "YAHWEH is salvation". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.... [more]
JULIA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).... [more]
JULIAN   m   English, Polish, German
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
KADEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KAREL   m   Dutch, Czech, Slovene
Dutch, Czech and Slovene form of CHARLES.
KARLA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian
German, Scandinavian and Croatian feminine form of CHARLES.
KEATON   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "shed town" in Old English.
KENT   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from Kent, the name of a county in England, which may be derived from a Brythonic word meaning "coastal district".
KIERAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KYLE   m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LEANNE   f   English
Combination of LEE and ANNE (1).
LENA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese
Scandinavian, German and Polish short form of HELENA or MAGDALENA, and a Russian short form of YELENA.
LEO   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEON   m   English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEONARDO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, History
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is also known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the 'Mona Lisa'. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
LILLIA   f   English
Short form of LILLIAN or an elaborated form of LILY.
LINUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.
LISSA   f   English
Short form of MELISSA.
LLOYD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Welsh llwyd meaning "grey". The composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-) is a famous bearer of this name.
LORENZ   m   German
German form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOUISE   f   French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LUCIA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCINA   f   Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin lucus meaning "grove", but later associated with lux "light". This was the name of a Roman goddess of childbirth.
LUCIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical, English
Roman praenomen, or given name, which was derived from Latin lux "light". This was the most popular of the praenomina. Two Etruscan kings of early Rome had this name as well as several prominent later Romans, including Lucius Annaeus Seneca (known simply as Seneca), a statesman, philosopher, orator and tragedian. The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament belonging to a Christian in Antioch. It was also borne by three popes, including the 3rd-century Saint Lucius. Despite this, the name was not regularly used in the Christian world until after the Renaissance.
LUKAS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian
German, Scandinavian and Lithuanian form of LUKE.
LYN   f   English
Variant of LYNN.
MAE   f   English
Variant of MAY. A famous bearer was American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.
MAGNUS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "great". It was borne by a 7th-century saint who was a missionary in Germany. It became popular in Scandinavia after the time of the 11th-century Norwegian king Magnus I, who was said to have been named after Charlemagne, or Carolus Magnus in Latin (however there was also a Norse name Magni). The name was borne by six subsequent kings of Norway as well as three kings of Sweden. It was imported to Scotland and Ireland during the Middle Ages.
MANSEL   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which originally referred to a person who came from the French city of Le Mans.
MARCIA   f   English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MARCIUS. It was borne by a few very minor saints. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARISA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.
MARLA   f   English
Shortened form of MARLENE.
MATTHEW   m   English, Biblical
English form of Ματθαιος (Matthaios), which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name מַתִּתְיָהוּ (Mattityahu) meaning "gift of YAHWEH". Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles. He was a tax collector, and supposedly the author of the first gospel in the New Testament. He is considered a saint in many Christian traditions. The variant Matthias also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a separate apostle. The name appears in the Old Testament as Mattithiah.... [more]
MEG   f   English
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET.
MIA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MICAIAH   m & f   Biblical
Means "who is like YAHWEH?" in Hebrew. This name occurs in the Old Testament belonging to both males and females.
MIDORI   f   Japanese
From Japanese (midori) meaning "green", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations which have the same pronunciation.
MINERVA   f   Roman Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MONICA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
MORGAN (1)   m & f   Welsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MURRAY   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the region in Scotland called Moray, meaning "seaboard settlement".
MUSTAFA   m   Arabic, Turkish
Means "the chosen one" in Arabic, an epithet of Muhammad. This was the name of four Ottoman sultans. Another famous bearer was Mustafa Kemal (1881-1938), also known as Atatürk, the founder of modern Turkey.
NASIR   m   Arabic
Means "helper" in Arabic. This transcription represents two different Arabic names.
NATASHA   f   Russian, English
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
NELSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of NEIL". It was originally given in honour of the British admiral Lord Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). His most famous battle was the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he repulsed the fleet of Napoleon, but was himself killed. Another notable bearer was the South African statesman Nelson Mandela (1918-2013). Mandela's birth name was Rolihlahla; as a child he was given the English name Nelson by a teacher.
NICO   m   Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of NICHOLAS (or sometimes NICODEMUS).
NILES   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name NEIL.
NILS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of NICHOLAS.
NINIAN   m   Scottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic
Meaning unknown. It appears in a Latinized form Niniavus, which could be from the Welsh name NYNNIAW. This was the name of a 5th-century British saint who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He is known as the Apostle to the Picts.
NINO (2)   f   Ancient Near Eastern (Hellenized), Georgian
Meaning unknown, possibly related to the masculine name NINOS. Saint Nino (sometimes called Nina) was a woman from Asia Minor who introduced Christianity to Georgia in the 4th century.
NOLAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
NYX   f   Greek Mythology
Means "night" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the night, the daughter of Khaos and the wife of Erebos.
OLIVER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
OLWEN   f   Welsh
Means "white footprint" from Welsh ol "footprint, track" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". In Welsh legend Olwen was a beautiful maiden, the lover of Culhwch and the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Her father insisted that Culhwch complete several seemingly impossible tasks before he would allow them to marry, and Culhwch was successful with all of them.
ORSON   m   English
From an English surname which was originally a nickname meaning "bear cub", from a diminutive of Norman French ors "bear", ultimately from Latin ursus. American actor and director Orson Welles (1915-1985) was a famous bearer of this name.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OSWIN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OWAIN   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Probably a Welsh form of EUGENE, though it might be derived from Welsh eoghunn meaning "youth". This was the name of several figures from Welsh history and mythology. In Arthurian legend Owain (also called Yvain in French sources) was one of the Knights of the Round Table, the son of King Urien and husband of the Lady of the Fountain. His character was based on that of Owain ap Urien, a 6th-century Welsh prince who fought against the Angles. This name was also borne by Owain Glyndwr, a 14th-century leader of Welsh resistance against English rule.
PABLO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of Paulus (see PAUL). Spanish painter and sculptor Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) was a famous bearer of this name.
PERCY   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name which was Latinized as Persius. The surname was borne by a noble English family, and it first used as a given name in their honour. A famous bearer was Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), an English romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias'. This name can also be used as a short form of PERCIVAL.
PERİ   f   Turkish
Turkish form of PARI.
PRIAM   m   Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Greek Πριαμος (Priamos), possibly meaning "redeemed". In Greek legend Priam was the king of Troy during the Trojan War and the father of many children including Hector and Paris.
PRISCILLA   f   English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).
RAMON   m   Catalan
Catalan form of RAYMOND.
RANULF   m   Scottish
Scottish form of the Old Norse name Randúlfr, a cognate of RANDOLF. Scandinavian settlers and invaders introduced this name to Scotland in the Middle Ages.
RAVEN   f & m   English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
REBECCA   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name רִבְקָה (Rivqah) from an unattested root probably meaning "join, tie, snare". This is the name of the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob in the Old Testament. It came into use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular with the Puritans in the 17th century.
REINA (1)   f   Spanish
Means "queen" in Spanish.
RHYS   m   Welsh
Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.
ROBIN   m & f   English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROGER   m   English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
ROLF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
ROSS   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish and English surname which originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir James Clark Ross (1800-1862), an Antarctic explorer.
ROY   m   Scottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of RUADH. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
SAKURA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom", though it is often written さくら using the hiragana writing system. It can also come from (saku) meaning "blossom" and (ra) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable" as well as other kanji combinations.
SALEH   m   Arabic
Variant transcription of SALIH.
SAMSON   m   Biblical, English, French, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name שִׁמְשׁוֹן (Shimshon) which meant "sun". Samson was an Old Testament hero granted exceptional strength by God. His mistress Delilah betrayed him and cut his hair, stripping him of his power. Thus he was captured by the Philistines, blinded, and brought to their temple. However, in a final act of strength, he pulled down the pillars of the temple upon himself and his captors.... [more]
SCARLET   f   English (Modern)
Either a variant of SCARLETT or else from the English word for the red colour. The word is derived (via Old French and medieval Latin) from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat), the name of a type of cloth.
SELENA   f   Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of SELENE. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.
SETH (1)   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
SHANNA   f   English
Possibly a feminine variant of SHANNON.
SHEENA   f   Scottish, English
Anglicized form of SÌNE. This name was popularized outside of Scotland in the 1980s by the singer Sheena Easton (1959-).
SHIRO   m   Japanese
Variant transcription of SHIROU.
SHURA   f & m   Russian
Russian diminutive of ALEKSANDRA or ALEKSANDR.
SIEGBERT   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and beraht "bright". This was the name of several Frankish kings, including the 7th-century Sigebert III of Austrasia who is regarded as a saint.
SIGRUN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of SIGRÚN.
SILAS   m   English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).... [more]
SOLEIL   f   Various
Means "sun" in French. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.
SONYA   f   Russian, English
Russian diminutive of SOPHIA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1869, English translation 1886).
SOPHIA   f   English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
SOPHIE   f   French, English, German, Dutch
French form of SOPHIA.
SØREN   m   Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of SEVERINUS. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher who is regarded as a precursor of existentialism.
TAKUMI   m   Japanese
From Japanese (takumi) meaning "artisan" or (takumi) meaning "skillful". It can also come from (taku) meaning "expand, open, support" combined with (mi) meaning "sea, ocean" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth". This name can also be formed of other kanji combinations.
TANITH   f   Near Eastern Mythology
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars.
TETHYS   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek τηθη (tethe) meaning "grandmother". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan associated with the sea. She was the wife of Oceanus.
TITANIA   f   Literature
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595) where it is the name of queen of the fairies. This is also a moon of Uranus, named after the Shakespearian character.
TOBIN   m   English
From an English surname which was itself derived from the given name TOBIAS.
TOMAS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Lithuanian
Swedish, Norwegian and Lithuanian form of THOMAS.
TORMOD   m   Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórmóðr, which meant "Thor's mind" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with móðr "mind, mood".
URSULA   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Late Roman
Means "little bear", derived from a diminutive form of the Latin word ursa "she-bear". Saint Ursula was a legendary virgin princess of the 4th century who was martyred by the Huns while returning from a pilgrimage. In England the saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and the name came into general use at that time.
VANESSA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem 'Cadenus and Vanessa' (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
VERONICA   f   English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VICTOR   m   English, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
VINCENT   m   English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
WALLACE   m   English, Scottish
From a Scottish and English surname which originally meant "Welsh" or "foreigner" in Norman French. It was first used as given name in honour of Sir William Wallace, the Scottish hero who led a rebellion to expel the English invaders from Scotland in the 13th century.
WENDELL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name WENDEL.
WYSTAN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
XANDER   m   Dutch, English (Modern)
Short form of ALEXANDER. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by a character on the television series 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' (1997-2003).
ZACHARIAS   m   Biblical, Biblical Greek
Greek form of ZECHARIAH. This form of the name is used in most English versions of the New Testament to refer to the father of John the Baptist. It was also borne by an 8th-century pope (called Zachary in English).
ZEKE   m   English
Short form of EZEKIEL.
214 results