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This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is Italian.
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LUISA   f   Spanish, Italian
Feminine form of LUIS.
LUISELLA   f   Italian
Diminutive of LUISA.
LUNA   f   Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
MADDALENA   f   Italian
Italian form of MAGDALENE.
MAFALDA   f   Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of MATILDA.
MANUELA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, German, Italian
Feminine form of MANUEL.
MARCELLA   f   Italian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MARCELLUS.
MARGHERITA   f   Italian
Italian form of MARGARET. This is also the Italian word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIANGELA   f   Italian
Combination of MARIA and ANGELA.
MARIANNA   f   Italian, English, Hungarian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Greek
Combination of MARIA and ANNA. It has been confused with the Roman name MARIANA to the point that it is no longer easy to separate the two forms. It is sometimes also used as a Latinized form of MARIAMNE.
MARIELLA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of MARIA.
MARIETTA   f   Italian, Greek, Hungarian
Italian, Greek and Hungarian diminutive of MARIA.
MARILENA   f   Italian, Romanian
Combination of MARIA and ELENA.
MARINELLA   f   Italian
Diminutive of MARINA.
MARISA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.
MARISTELLA   f   Italian
Italian form of MARISTELA.
MARTINA   f   German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
MARZIA   f   Italian
Italian form of MARCIA.
MATILDE   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of MATILDA.
MATTEA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of MATTHEW.
MAURA (1)   f   Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Feminine form of MAURUS.
MELANIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Polish, Late Roman
Italian, Spanish and Polish form of MELANIE.
MICAELA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHELA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of MICHAEL.
MICHELANGELA   f   Italian
Feminine form of MICHELANGELO.
MICHELINA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of MICHELE (1).
MILENA   f   Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian
Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.
MIMI   f   English, Italian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with M.
MIRABELLA   f   Italian
Latinate form of MIRABELLE.
MIRELLA   f   Italian
Italian form of MIREILLE.
MIRTA   f   Spanish, Italian, Croatian
Spanish, Italian and Croatian cognate of MYRTLE.
MONICA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
NADIA (1)   f   French, Italian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Variant of NADYA (1) used in the Western world, as well as a variant transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).
NARCISA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NELLA   f   Italian
Short form of ANTONELLA.
NERINA   f   Italian
Feminine form of NERIO.
NICOLETTA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of NICOLA (1).
NICOLINA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of NICOLA (1).
NINA (1)   f   Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NIVES   f   Italian, Croatian
Italian form of NIEVES.
NOEMI   f   Italian, German, Czech, Biblical Latin
Italian, German and Czech form of NAOMI (1).
NORA   f   Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).
NORINA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of NORA.
NORMA   f   English, Italian, Literature
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera 'Norma' (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
NUNZIA   f   Italian
Short form of ANNUNZIATA.
NUNZIATINA   f   Italian
Diminutive of NUNZIA.
OFELIA   f   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of OPHELIA.
OLGA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLIVIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
ONDINA   f   Portuguese, Italian
Portuguese and Italian form of UNDINE.
ORIA   f   Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Aurea which was derived from Latin aureus "golden". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Ostia (near Rome), as well as an 11th-century Spanish saint.
ORIANA   f   Italian, Spanish
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.
ORLANDA   f   Italian
Feminine form of ORLANDO.
ORNELLA   f   Italian
Created by the Italian author Gabriele d'Annunzio for his novel 'La Figlia di Jorio' (1904). It is derived from Tuscan Italian ornello meaning "flowering ash tree".
ORSINA   f   Italian
Feminine form of ORSINO.
ORSOLA   f   Italian
Italian form of URSULA.
OSANNA   f   Italian (Rare)
Italian form of HOSANNA. This was the name of a 15th-century Italian saint and mystic.
OTTAVIA   f   Italian
Italian form of OCTAVIA.
PALMIRA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of PALMIRO.
PAOLA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian feminine form of PAUL.
PAOLINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PASQUALINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of PASCAL.
PATRIZIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PÀULA   f   Sardinian
Sardinian feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL).
PERLA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish cognate of PEARL.
PERLITA   f   Italian, Spanish
Diminutive of PERLA.
PETRONILLA   f   Italian, Late Roman
From a Latin name, a diminutive of Petronia, the feminine form of PETRONIUS. This was the name of an obscure 1st-century Roman saint, later believed to be a daughter of Saint Peter.
PIERA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of PETER.
PIERINA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of PIERO.
PIETRA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of PETER.
PIETRINA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of PIETRO.
PINA   f   Italian
Short form of names ending in pina.
PLACIDA   f   Late Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Placidus (see PLACIDO).
POLISSENA   f   Italian (Rare)
Italian form of POLYXENA.
PRISCILLA   f   English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).
RACHELE   f   Italian
Italian form of RACHEL.
RAFFAELLA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of RAPHAEL.
RAIMONDA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of RAYMOND.
REBECCA   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name רִבְקָה (Rivqah) from an unattested root probably meaning "join, tie, snare". This is the name of the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob in the Old Testament. It came into use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular with the Puritans in the 17th century.
REGINA   f   English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
RICCARDA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of RICHARD.
RINA (1)   f   Italian, Dutch
Short form of CATERINA or CATHARINA as well as other names ending in rina.
RITA   f   Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
ROBERTA   f   English, Italian, Spanish
Feminine form of ROBERT.
ROBERTINA   f   Italian, Spanish
Feminine diminutive of ROBERTO.
ROMANA   f   Italian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman
Feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMILDA   f & m   Italian, Ancient Germanic
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
ROMINA   f   Italian
Possibly a variant of ROMANA.
ROMOLA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of ROMULUS.
ROSA (1)   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSALBA   f   Italian
Italian name meaning "white rose", derived from Latin rosa "rose" and alba "white". A famous bearer was the Venetian painter Rosalba Carriera (1675-1757).
ROSALIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.
ROSALINDA   f   Spanish, Italian
Latinate form of ROSALIND.
ROSANGELA   f   Italian
Combination of ROSA (1) and ANGELA.
ROSANNA   f   Italian, English
Combination of ROSA (1) and ANNA.
ROSARIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of ROSARIO.
ROSARIO   f & m   Spanish, Italian
Means "rosary", and is taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora del Rosario meaning "Our Lady of the Rosary". This name is feminine in Spanish and masculine in Italian.
ROSELLA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1).
ROSETTA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1).
ROSINA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1). This is the name of a character in Rossini's opera 'The Barber of Seville' (1816).
ROSSA   f   Italian
Means "red" in Italian.
ROSSANA   f   Italian
Italian form of ROXANA.
ROSSELLA   f   Italian
Diminutive of ROSSA.
RUBINA   f   Italian
Derived from Italian rubino meaning "ruby", ultimately from Latin ruber "red".
SABINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
SABRINA   f   English, Italian, German
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque 'Comus' (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play 'Sabrina Fair' (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.
SALVATRICE   f   Italian
From Salvatrix, the feminine form of Salvator (see SALVADOR).
SAMANTA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of SAMANTHA.
SAMANTHA   f   English, Italian, Dutch
Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of SAMUEL, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show 'Bewitched'.
SAMUELA   f   Italian
Feminine form of SAMUEL.
SANDRA   f   Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887). A famous bearer is American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).
SANTA   f   Italian
Feminine form of SANTO.
SANTINA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of SANTO.
SANTUZZA   f   Italian
Diminutive of SANTA.
SAVERIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of XAVIER.
SAVINA   f   Italian
Italian variant of SABINA.
SCILLA   f   Italian
Short form of PRISCILLA. This is also the Italian word for the squill flower (genus Scilla).
SEBASTIANA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Sebastianus (see SEBASTIAN).
SELVAGGIA   f   Italian
Means "wild" in Italian.
SERAFINA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Polish (Rare)
Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Polish form of SERAPHINA.
SERENA   f   English, Italian, Late Roman
From a Late Latin name which was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
SIBILLA   f   Italian
Italian form of SIBYLLA.
SILVANA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of SILVANUS.
SILVESTRA   f   Italian, Slovene
Feminine form of SILVESTER.
SILVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SIMONETTA   f   Italian
Diminutive of SIMONA.
STEFANIA   f   Italian, Polish
Italian and Polish feminine form of STEPHEN.
STELLA (1)   f   English, Italian, Dutch, German
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
SUSANNA   f   Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
From Σουσαννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.... [more]
SVEVA   f   Italian
Meaning unknown, possibly related to the name of the Germanic tribe of the Suebi.
TAIDE   f   Italian (Rare)
Italian form of THAÏS.
TAMARA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian
Russian form of TAMAR. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).
TANIA   f   English, Italian
Variant of TANYA.
TATIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TECLA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of THEKLA.
TEODORA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Polish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Feminine form of Theodoros (see THEODORE).
TEOFILA   f   Italian, Polish (Rare)
Italian and Polish feminine form of THEOPHILUS.
TERESA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Cognate of THERESA. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse de Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
TINA   f   English, Italian, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Short form of CHRISTINA, MARTINA, and other names ending in tina. In addition to these names, it is also used in Dutch as a diminutive of CATHARINA and in Croatian as a diminutive of KATARINA.
TIZIANA   f   Italian
Feminine form of TIZIANO.
TONINA   f   Italian
Diminutive of ANTONIA.
TULLIA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Tullius (see TULLIO).
URBANA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of URBAN.
VALENTINA   f   Italian, Russian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.
VALERIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
VANESSA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem 'Cadenus and Vanessa' (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
VANNA (1)   f   Italian
Short form of GIOVANNA.
VELIA   f   Italian
From the Roman family name Velius which possibly means "concealed" in Latin.
VERA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERONICA   f   English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Latin alteration of BERENICE, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
VINCENZA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of VINCENT.
VIOLA   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Czech
Means "violet" in Latin. This was the name of the heroine in Shakespeare's play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
VIOLANTE   f   Late Roman, Italian
Latin form of YOLANDA.
VIOLETTA   f   Italian, Russian, Hungarian
Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of VIOLET.
VIRGINIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.... [more]
VISSENTA   f   Sardinian
Sardinian feminine form of VINCENT.
VITA   f   Ancient Roman, Italian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Danish
Feminine form of VITUS.
VITALIA   f   Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of VITALE.
VITTORIA   f   Italian
Italian form of VICTORIA.
VIVIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Feminine form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN). Saint Viviana (also known as Bibiana) was a Roman saint and martyr of the 4th century.
ZAIRA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ZAÏRE.
ZITA (1)   f   Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak
Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.
ZOE   f   English, Italian, Ancient Greek
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century. As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).
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