Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is Danish.
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AASE f Danish, Norwegian
Old variant of ÅSE.
ABELONE f Danish
Danish form of APOLLONIA.
AGATHE f French, German, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Greek
Form of AGATHA in several languages.
AGNES f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.... [more]
AGNETE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of AGNES.
AGNETHE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian variant of AGNES.
AINA (1) f Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of AINO. It also means "always" in Finnish.
ALBERTE (2) f French, Danish
French and Danish feminine form of ALBERT.
ALEX m & f English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Czech, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDRA f English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Catalan, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALVILDA f Danish (Rare)
Danish form of ALFHILD.
AMALIE f Norwegian, Danish, German (Rare)
Norwegian, Danish and German form of AMALIA.
AMANDA f English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda meaning "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play Love's Last Shift (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
ANDREA (2) f English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANE (1) f Danish
Danish diminutive of ANNA.
ANETTE f Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Scandinavian variant of ANNETTE.
ANIKA (1) f German, Dutch, Danish, Slovene
German, Dutch, Danish and Slovene diminutive of ANNA or ANA.
ANITA (1) f Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANJA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, German, Dutch
Form of ANYA in several languages.
ANNA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
ANNE (1) f French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. It was imported to England in the 13th century, but it did not become popular until three centuries later. The spelling variant Ann was also commonly found from this period, and is still used to this day.... [more]
ANNELISE f Danish
Danish form of ANNELIESE.
ANNEMARIE f Dutch, German, Danish
Combination of ANNA and MARIE.
ANNETTE f French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNI f Finnish, German, Danish
Finnish, German and Danish diminutive of ANNA.
ASLØG f Danish
Danish form of ASLAUG.
ASTA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of ASTRID.
ASTRID f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking.
BARBARA f English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BEATA f Polish, German, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
BEATE f German, Norwegian, Danish
German form of BEATA.
BENEDIKTE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENTE f Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Danish feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENTHE f Danish, Dutch
Variant of BENTE.
BINE (1) f Danish
Short form of JACOBINE.
BIRGIT f Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German
Scandinavian variant of BIRGITTA.
BIRGITTA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish
Most likely a Scandinavian form of BRIDGET via the Latinized form Brigitta. Alternatively it could be a feminine derivative of BIRGER. This is the name of the patron saint of Europe, Birgitta of Sweden, the 14th-century founder of the Bridgettine nuns. Her father's name was Birger.
BIRGITTE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of BIRGITTA.
BIRTE f Danish
Danish diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BIRTHE f Danish
Danish diminutive of BIRGITTA.
BODIL f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Bóthildr, derived from bót "remedy" and hildr "battle".
BRITT f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
BRITTA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of BIRGITTA.
CAJA f Danish
Variant of KAJA (1).
CAMILLA f English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the Aeneid. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel Camilla (1796).
CATHRINE f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of KATHERINE.
CECILIA f English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CECILIE f Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish form of CECILIA.
CHARLOTTE f French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette.... [more]
CHRISTINA f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.
CHRISTINE f French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CILLE f Danish
Danish diminutive of CECILIA.
CLARA f German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus, which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
DAGMAR f Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak
From the Old Norse name Dagmær, derived from the elements dagr "day" and mær "maid". This was the name adopted by the popular Bohemian wife of the Danish king Valdemar II when they married in 1205. Her birth name was Markéta.
DAGNY f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Dagný, which was derived from the elements dagr "day" and nýr "new".
DIANA f English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
DINA (1) f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Latvian, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of DINAH, and also the form used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
DITTE f Danish
Danish diminutive of EDITH, DOROTHEA or names containing dit. It was popularized by Martin Andersen Nexø's novel Ditte, Child of Man (1921) and the film adaptation (1946).
DORETE f Danish
Danish variant of DOROTHEA.
DORIT (2) f Danish
Danish diminutive of DOROTHEA.
DOROTHEA f German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, English, Late Greek
Feminine form of the Late Greek name Δωροθεος (Dorotheos), which meant "gift of God" from Greek δωρον (doron) meaning "gift" and θεος (theos) meaning "god". The name Theodore is composed of the same elements in reverse order. Dorothea was the name of two early saints, notably the 4th-century martyr Dorothea of Caesarea. It was also borne by the 14th-century Saint Dorothea of Montau, who was the patron saint of Prussia.
DORTE f Danish
Danish form of DOROTHY.
DORTHE f Danish
Danish form of DOROTHY.
EA (2) f Danish, Norwegian
Short form of names ending in ea.
EDITH f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
ELI (3) f Spanish, Norwegian, Danish
Spanish, Norwegian and Danish short form of ELISABET or ELIN.
ELIN f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh
Scandinavian and Welsh form of HELEN.
ELINE f Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Norwegian, Danish and Dutch variant form of HELEN. This is the name of the title character in the novel Eline Vere (1889) by the Dutch writer Louis Couperus.
ELISABET f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, Spanish, Biblical Greek
Scandinavian and Finnish form of ELIZABETH. It is also used in Spain alongside the traditional form Isabel.
ELISABETH f German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.
ELLA (2) f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El. It can also be a short form of names ending in ella.
ELLINOR f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of ELEANOR.
ELNA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of HELENA.
ELVA (2) f Danish, Icelandic
Feminine form of ALF (1).
EMBLA f Norse Mythology, Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Old Norse almr "elm". In Norse mythology Embla and her husband Ask were the first humans. They were created by three of the gods from two trees.
EMILIE f German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Czech
German, Scandinavian and Czech feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMMA f English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
ERIKA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
ERNA (2) f Norse Mythology, Icelandic, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Means "brisk, vigorous, hale" in Old Norse. This was the name of the wife of Jarl in Norse legend.
ESTHER f English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.... [more]
EVA f Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Form of EVE used in various languages. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. The name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.... [more]
EVY f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Diminutive of EVA or EVELINA.
FREDERIKKE f Danish
Danish feminine form of FREDERICK.
FREJA f Danish, Swedish
Danish and Swedish form of FREYA.
FRIDA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
GERD (2) f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse garðr meaning "enclosure". In Norse myth Gerd was a fertility goddess, a frost giantess who was the wife of Freyr.
GERDA (2) f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Latinized form of GERD (2).
GINA f Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of VIRGINIA or EUGENIA. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.
GITTE f Danish
Danish short form of BIRGITTE.
GRETE f German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of MARGARET.
GRETHE f Danish, Norwegian
Short form of MARGRETHE.
GRY f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Means "dawn" in Norwegian.
GUDRUN f Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
GULL f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of various Scandinavian names beginning with the Old Norse element guð meaning "god".
GUNDA f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund meaning "war".
GUNHILD f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnhildr, derived from the elements gunnr "war" and hildr "battle".
GUNVOR f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Gunnvǫr meaning "cautious in war" from gunnr "war" combined with vǫr "vigilant, cautious".
GYDA f Danish
Danish form of Gyða (see GYTHA).
HANNE (1) f & m Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of JOHANNE, or a German and Dutch short form of JOHANNA. This can also be a Dutch short form of JOHANNES (masculine).
HEDVIG f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian
Scandinavian and Hungarian form of HEDWIG.
HEGE f Norwegian, Danish
Diminutive of HELGA.
HEIDI f German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Finnish, English
German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel Heidi (1880) by the Swiss author Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.
HELEN f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) meaning "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HELENE f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HELLE (1) f Danish, Norwegian
Danish variant of HELGA.
HENRIETTE f French, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
French feminine diminutive of HENRY.
HENRIKE f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian feminine form of HENRY.
HILDA f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDEGARD f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HJØRDIS f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of HJÖRDIS.
HULDA (1) f Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "gracious, sweet, lovable".
IBEN f Danish, Norwegian
Possibly a feminine form of IB. It is associated with Danish ibenholt meaning "ebony".
IDA f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem The Princess (1847), which was later adapted into the play Princess Ida (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
INA f German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, English, Limburgish, Slovene, Latvian
Short form of names ending with ina.
INGE f & m Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
INGEBJØRG f Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish variant of INGEBORG.
INGEBORG f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingibjǫrg, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with bjǫrg meaning "help, save, rescue".
INGEGERD f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ingigerðr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with garðr meaning "enclosure".
INGER f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Originally a variant of INGRID or INGEGERD.
INGRID f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
IRENE f English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
IRIS f Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Greek
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
ISABELLA f Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).... [more]
JACOBINE f Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Norwegian, Danish and Dutch feminine form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JANNE (2) f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian diminutive of JOHANNA.
JANNICKE f Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Scandinavian feminine diminutive of JAN (1), from Low German.
JANNIKE f Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Scandinavian feminine diminutive of JAN (1), from Low German.
JESSICA f English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play The Merchant of Venice (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. It reached its peak of popularity in the United States in 1987, and was the top ranked name for girls between 1985 and 1995, excepting 1991 and 1992 (when it was unseated by Ashley). Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JOHANNE f French, Danish, Norwegian, Medieval French
French, Danish and Norwegian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
JONNA f Danish, Swedish, Finnish
Short form of JOHANNA.
JOSEFINE f Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German
Scandinavian and German form of JOSÉPHINE.
JUDIT f Hungarian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Form of JUDITH used in several languages.
JULIA f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).... [more]
JULIE f French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JYTTE f Danish
Danish form of JUTTA.
KAJA (1) f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Estonian, Slovene
Scandinavian diminutive of KATARINA.
KAMILLA f Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Hungarian form of CAMILLA, as well as a Scandinavian variant. This is also the Hungarian word for the chamomile flower (species Matricaria chamomilla).
KAREN (1) f Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, English
Danish short form of KATHERINE. It became common in the English-speaking world after the 1930s.
KARLA f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian
German, Scandinavian, Czech and Croatian feminine form of CHARLES.
KAROLINE f German, Danish, Norwegian
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
KATHRINE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of KATHERINE.
KATJA f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Slovene
Form of KATYA in various languages.
KATRINE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of KATHERINE.
KIRSTEN f Danish, Norwegian, English
Danish and Norwegian form of CHRISTINA.
KIRSTINE f Danish
Danish form of CHRISTINA.
KRIS m & f English, Danish
Short form of KRISTIAN, KRISTOFFER, and other names beginning with Kris.
KRISTIN f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, English
Scandinavian and German form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTINA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, German, Slovene, Czech, Lithuanian, Serbian, Croatian, Faroese, English, Bulgarian
Form of CHRISTINA in several languages. It is also an English variant of CHRISTINA and a Bulgarian variant of HRISTINA.
KRISTINE f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, English, German
Scandinavian form of CHRISTINE, as well as an English and German variant.
LÆRKE f Danish
Means "lark" in Danish.
LAILA (2) f Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish
Scandinavian and Finnish form of LÁILÁ.
LAURA f English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LEA f German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Hebrew
Form of LEAH used in several languages.
LENA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LENE f German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of HELENE or MAGDALENE.
LILLY f English, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
English variant of LILY. It is also used in Scandinavia, as a form of LILY or a diminutive of ELISABETH.
LINA (2) f English, Italian, Spanish, German, French, Lithuanian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Short form of names ending in lina.
LINDA f English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful". In the English-speaking world this name experienced a spike in popularity beginning in the 1930s, peaking in the late 1940s, and declining shortly after that. It was the most popular name for girls in the United States from 1947 to 1952.
LINE f Danish, Norwegian, French
Short form of CAROLINE and other names ending in line.
LIS f Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Short form of ELISABET.
LISA f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of ELIZABETH and its cognates in other languages. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the Mona Lisa, the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.... [more]
LISBET f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of ELISABET.
LISSI f Danish
Diminutive of ELISABET.
LIV (1) f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from the Old Norse name Hlíf meaning "protection". Its use has been influenced by the modern Scandinavian word liv meaning "life".
LIVA f Danish
Variant of LIV (1).
LONE f Danish
Short form of ABELONE.
LOUISE f French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LOVISE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian feminine form of LOUIS.
LUCIA f Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LYKKE f Danish
Means "good fortune, happiness" in Danish.
MAIKEN f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian diminutive of MARIA.
MAJKEN f Danish, Swedish
Variant of MAIKEN.
MALENE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of MAGDALENA.
MALOU f Danish
Short form of MARIE-LOUISE.
MAREN f Danish, Norwegian
Danish form of MARINA.
MARGARETHE f German, Danish
German and Danish form of MARGARET.
MARGIT f Hungarian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, German
Hungarian and Scandinavian form of MARGARET.
MARGRETHE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of MARGARET. This is the name of the current queen of Denmark (1940-).
MARI (1) f Welsh, Breton, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Welsh, Breton, Estonian and Finnish form of MARIA, as well as a Hungarian diminutive of MÁRIA. It is also a Scandinavian form of MARIE.
MARIA f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIANN f Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Scandinavian variant of MARIANNE.
MARIANNE f French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Originally a French diminutive of MARIE. It is also considered a combination of MARIE and ANNE (1). Shortly after the formation of the French Republic in 1792, a female figure by this name was adopted as the symbol of the state.
MARIE f & m French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French and Czech form of MARIA. It has been very common in France since the 13th century. At the opening of the 20th century it was given to approximately 20 percent of French girls. This percentage has declined steadily over the course of the century, and it dropped from the top rank in 1958.... [more]
MARNA f Danish
Danish short form of MARINA.
MARTHA f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) meaning "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.... [more]
MATHILDE f French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish
Form of MATILDA in several languages.
MERETE f Danish
Danish form of MARGARET.
META f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian short form of MARGARET.
METTE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish diminutive of MARGARET.
MIA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MIE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian diminutive of MARIE.
MIKKELINE f Danish
Danish feminine form of MIKKEL.
MILLA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Short form of CAMILLA and other names that end in milla.
MILLE f & m Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Danish and Norwegian short form of EMILIE (feminine) and Swedish short form of EMIL (masculine).
MIRIAM f Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
MONA (2) f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of MONIKA.
MYNTE f Danish
Means "mint" in Danish.
NAJA f Native American, Greenlandic, Danish
Means "boy's younger sister" in Greenlandic. It was popularized in Denmark by the writer B. S. Ingemann, who used it in his novel Kunnuk and Naja, or the Greenlanders (1842).
NANNA (1) f Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Norse nanþ meaning "daring, brave". In Norse legend she was a goddess who died of grief when her husband Balder was killed.
NATALIE f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
NATHALIE f French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
French form of NATALIE, as well as a Dutch, German and Scandinavian variant.
NINA (1) f Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also nearly coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NORA (1) f Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, German, Dutch, Italian
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play A Doll's House (1879).
OLGA f Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLINE f Norwegian, Danish
Feminine form of OLE.
OLIVIA f English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time that may have been based on OLIVA or OLIVER, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
PAULA f German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
PAULINE f French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PERNILLE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of PETRONILLA.
RAGNA f Icelandic, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Ancient Scandinavian
Short form of Old Norse names beginning with the element regin "advice, counsel".
RAGNHILD f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Ragnhildr, composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and hildr "battle".
RAKEL f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic
Scandinavian form of RACHEL.
RANDI (2) f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Modern form of the Old Norse name Ragnfríðr, which was derived from regin "advice, counsel" and fríðr "beautiful".
REBEKKA f German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Faroese, Finnish, Biblical Greek
Form of REBECCA used in various languages. It is also the form used in the Greek Old Testament.
REGINA f English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
RIGMOR f Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Scandinavian form of RICMOD.
RIKKE f Danish
Danish short form of FREDERIKKE.
RITA f Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
ROSA (1) f Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
RUNA f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Feminine form of RUNE.
RUTH (1) f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Hebrew name that was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.... [more]
SABINE f French, German, Danish
French, German and Danish form of SABINA.
SANDRA f Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Czech, Romanian
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel Emilia in England (1864) and the reissued version Sandra Belloni (1887). A famous bearer is the American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).
SANNE f Dutch, Danish
Dutch and Danish short form of SUSANNA.
SELMA (1) f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.
SIDSEL f Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish variant form of CECILIA.
SIGNE f Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Latvian
Modern Scandinavian form of SIGNÝ.
SIGRID f Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SILJE f Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish diminutive of CECILIA.
SILLE f Danish
Danish diminutive of CECILIA.
SIMONE (1) f French, English, German, Dutch, Danish, Portuguese
French feminine form of SIMON (1). A famous bearer was Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
SIRI f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of SIGRID.
SIV f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Means "bride" in Old Norse. In Norse mythology Siv was the wife of Thor.
SOFIE f German, Danish, Dutch, Czech
Form of SOPHIE in several languages.
SOLVEJ f Danish
Danish form of SOLVEIG.
STINA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of CHRISTINA and other names ending in stina.
STINE f Danish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of CHRISTINE and other names ending in stine.
STORM m & f English (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
SUSANN f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian short form of SUSANNE.
SUSANNE f German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
German and Scandinavian form of SUSANNA.
SYLVIA f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
TATIANA f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TERESA f Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Catalan, Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Form of THERESA used in several languages. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the Albanian missionary Saint Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997), better known as Mother Teresa, who worked with the poor in India. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse of Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
TERESE f Basque, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Basque and Scandinavian form of TERESA.
THERESA f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Spanish and Portuguese name Teresa. It was first recorded as Therasia, being borne by the Spanish wife of Saint Paulinus of Nola in the 4th century. The meaning is uncertain, but it could be derived from Greek θερος (theros) meaning "summer", from Greek θεριζω (therizo) meaning "to harvest", or from the name of the Greek island of Therasia (the western island of Santorini).... [more]
THERESE f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German and Scandinavian variant of THERESA.
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