Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is Dutch.
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AART   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of ARNOLD.
ABE (2)   m   Frisian, Dutch
Variant of ABBE.
ABRAHAM   m   English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
AD   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of ADRIAAN.
ADAM   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADELBERT   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of ADALBERT.
ADOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
ADRIAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ADRIAN.
ADRIANUS   m   Dutch
Official Dutch form of ADRIAN, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.
ALBERT   m   English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBERTUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized), Dutch
Latinized form of Adalbert (see ALBERT).
ALDERT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of a Germanic name, either ALDHARD or ADALHARD.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALFONS   m   German, Dutch, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Polish form of ALFONSO.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALLARD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ADALHARD.
ALWIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From either of the two Germanic names ALFWIN or ADALWIN.
AMBROOS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
ANDREAS   m   German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek and Latin form of ANDREW. It is also the form used in modern Greek, German and Welsh.
ANDRIES   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ANDREW.
ANTONIE (2)   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Dutch
Ancient Roman form of ANTHONY. This is also the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but commonly rendered Anton or Antoon in daily life.
ANTOON   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
AREND   m   Dutch, German
Dutch and German variant of ARNOLD. This is also the Dutch word for "eagle".
ARIE (1)   m   Dutch
Diminutive of ADRIAAN.
ARIS (2)   m   Dutch
Diminutive of ADRIAAN.
ARJAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ADRIAN.
ARNO   m   Dutch, German
Short form of ARNOUD or ARNOLD.
ARNOUD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ARNOLD.
ARNOUT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ARNOLD.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
AUGUSTIJN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AUGUSTUS   m   Ancient Roman, Dutch
Means "great" or "venerable", derived from Latin augere "to increase". Augustus was the title given to Octavian, the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. This was also the name of three kings of Poland.
BAREND   m   Dutch
Variant of BERNHARD.
BART   m   English, Dutch
Short form of BARTHOLOMEW. This name is borne by a cartoon boy on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
BARTEL   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of BARTHOLOMEW.
BARTHOLOMEUS   m   Dutch, Biblical Latin
Dutch and Latin form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BAS   m   Dutch
Short form of SEBASTIAAN.
BASTIAAN   m   Dutch
Short form of SEBASTIAAN.
BEN (1)   m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT. A notable bearer was Ben Jonson (1572-1637), an English poet and playwright.
BEN (2)   m   Dutch
Short form of BERNHARD and other Germanic names beginning with the element bern meaning "bear".
BENEDICTUS   m   Late Roman, Dutch
Original Latin form of BENEDICT, as well as the modern Dutch form.
BENJAMIN   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
BERNARD   m   English, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BERNHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of BERNARD.
BERT   m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of ALBERT and other names containing the element bert, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BOB   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. It was borne by the character Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843). Other famous bearers include American folk musician Bob Dylan (1941-) and Jamaican reggae musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
BOELE   m   Dutch
Possibly a Dutch form of BALDO.
BONIFAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BOUDEWIJN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of BALDWIN.
BRAAM   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of ABRAHAM.
BRAM   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ABRAHAM. This name was borne by Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the Irish author who wrote 'Dracula'.
BRECHT   m   Dutch
Short form of names containing brecht, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BROOS   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of AMBROOS.
CAS   m   Dutch
Short form of CASPER.
CASPER   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Dutch and Scandinavian form of JASPER. This is the name of a friendly ghost in a series of comic books.
CEEL   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of MARCELLUS.
CEES   m   Dutch
Variant of KEES.
CHRIS   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
CHRISTIAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTOFFEL   m   Dutch (Archaic)
Dutch form of KRISTOFFER.
CLEMENS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Original Latin form of CLEMENT, as well as the German, Dutch and Scandinavian form.
COBUS   m   Dutch
Short form of JACOBUS.
COEN   m   Dutch
Short form of COENRAAD.
COENRAAD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of CONRAD.
CONSTANTIJN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
COOS   m   Dutch
Diminutive of JACOB.
CORNÉ   m   Dutch
Diminutive of CORNELIS.
CORNELIS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of CORNELIUS.
CORNELIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
DAAN   m   Dutch
Short form of DANIËL.
DAMIAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of DAMIAN.
DAMIAN   m   English, Polish, Dutch
From the Greek name Δαμιανος (Damianos) which was derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmo in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.
DANIËL   m   Dutch
Dutch form of DANIEL.
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DENNIS   m   English, German, Dutch
Usual English, German and Dutch form of DENIS.
DICK (2)   m   Dutch
Short form of DIEDERIK.
DIEDE   m   Dutch
Short form of DIEDERIK and other names beginning with the same element, originally from Germanic theud meaning "people".
DIEDERICK   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of DIEDERIK.
DIEDERIK   m   Dutch
Dutch form of THEODORIC.
DIRK   m   Dutch, German, English
Short form of DIEDERIK. The name was popularized in the English-speaking world by actor Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), who had some Dutch ancestry. This is also the Scots word for a type of dagger.
DOMINICUS   m   Late Roman, Dutch
Original Latin form of DOMINIC, as well as the modern Dutch form.
ED   m   English, Dutch
Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDWIN   m   English, Dutch
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
EGBERT   m   English, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
ELBERT   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of ADELBERT.
ELIA   m   Italian, Dutch
Italian and Dutch form of ELIJAH.
ELIAN   m & f   Dutch
Dutch variant of names beginning with Eli, such as ELIJAH or ELISABETH.
EMERENS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of EMERENTIUS.
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERNST   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of ERNEST.
ERWIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic name Hariwini, composed of the elements hari "army" and win "friend". It may have merged somewhat with the Germanic name EBURWIN. A notable bearer was Erwin Schrodinger (1887-1961), an Austrian physicist who made contributions to quantum theory.
ESMÉ   m & f   English, Dutch
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.
EVERT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of EVERARD.
EWALD   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name which was composed of the elements ewa "law, custom" and wald "rule".
EWOUD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of EWALD.
EWOUT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of EWALD.
FAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of BONIFAAS or SERVAAS.
FABIAN   m   German, Dutch, Polish, History
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.
FELIX   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
FEMME   m   Dutch, Frisian
Diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element frid "peace".
FERDI   m   German, Dutch
Short form of FERDINAND.
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FESTER   m   Dutch (Rare)
Possibly a short form of SILVESTER.
FILIBERT   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "much brightness" from the Germanic elements filu "much" and beraht "bright".
FILIPPUS   m   Dutch
Official Dutch form of PHILIP, used on birth certificates but not commonly in daily life.
FLIP   m   Dutch
Diminutive of FILIP.
FLOOR   m & f   Dutch
Dutch form of Florentius (see FLORENCE) or FLORA.
FLORIS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FONS   m   Dutch
Short form of ALFONS.
FRANCISCUS   m   Late Roman, Dutch
Original form of FRANCIS.
FRANK (1)   m   English, German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis.... [more]
FRANS   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Dutch, Scandinavian and Finnish form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FREDERIK   m   Danish, Dutch
Danish and Dutch form of FREDERICK. This was the name of nine kings of Denmark over the past 500 years, alternating each generation with the name Christian.
FREEK   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of FREDERICK.
FRITS   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of FREDERIK.
FUNS   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of ALFONS.
FUNSKE   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Diminutive of ALFONS.
GABRIËL   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GABRIEL.
GEERT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERHARD.
GERARD   m   English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GERBEN   m   Dutch
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and bern "bear".
GERD (1)   m   German, Dutch
Short form of GERHARD.
GERHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of GERARD.
GERLACH   m   Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with laic "play". Saint Gerlach was a 12th-century Dutch soldier who became a hermit.
GERLOF   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERULF.
GEROLF   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERULF.
GEROLT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERALD.
GERRIT   m   Dutch, Frisian
Dutch and Frisian form of GERARD.
GERRY   m & f   English, Dutch
Diminutive of GERALD, GERARD or GERALDINE.
GERT   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch short form of GERHARD.
GIJS   m   Dutch
Short form of GIJSBERT.
GIJSBERT   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of GISBERT.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILLIS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GILES.
GODFRIED   m   Dutch
Dutch cognate of Godafrid (see GODFREY).
GUSTAAF   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GUSTAV.
GUUS   m   Dutch
Short form of AUGUSTUS or GUSTAAF.
HANKE   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of JOHAN.
HANNE (1)   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of JOHANNE, or a German and Dutch short form of JOHANNA. This can also be a Dutch short form of JOHANNES (masculine).
HANNES   m   German, Swedish, Dutch, Finnish
Short form of JOHANNES.
HANS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian short form of JOHANNES. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a Renaissance portrait painter from Germany, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
HARM   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of HERMAN.
HEIKE   f & m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HENRIKE or HEINRICH.
HEIKO   m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEIN   m   Dutch
Diminutive of HENDRIK.
HEINO   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German form of Haimo (see HAMO).
HENDRIK   m   Dutch, German, Estonian
Dutch and Estonian cognate of HENRY.
HENK   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of HENDRIK.
HENNIE   m & f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive and feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENNY   m & f   Dutch
Dutch diminutive and feminine form of HENDRIK.
HERMAN   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by a 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church. Another famous bearer was Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of 'Moby-Dick'.
HIERONYMUS   m   German, Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of JEROME used in Germany and the Netherlands. Hieronymus Bosch was a 15th-century Dutch painter known for his depictions of the torments of hell.
HUBERT   m   English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century.
HUBRECHT   m   Dutch (Archaic)
Dutch variant of HUBERT.
HUGO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HUUB   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of HUBERT.
IGNAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of IGNATIUS.
IJSBRAND   m   Dutch
Derived from the Germanic elements is "ice, iron" and brand "sword".
INGE   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
IVO (1)   m   German, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element iv meaning "yew". Alternative theories suggest that it may in fact be derived from a cognate Celtic element. This was the name of several saints (who are also commonly known as Saint Yves or Ives).
IZAÄK   m   Dutch
Dutch form of ISAAC.
JAAK   m   Estonian, Flemish
Estonian form of JACOB or JAMES, and a Flemish short form of JACOB.
JAAP   m   Dutch
Short form of JACOB.
JACOB   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".... [more]
JACOBUS   m   Dutch, Late Roman
Latin form of JACOB, also used in Dutch.
JAN (1)   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan
Form of JOHANNES. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer.
JASPER   m   English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JEF   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of JOZEF.
JELLE   m   Frisian, Dutch
Originally a Frisian short form of Germanic names beginning with the element gild "sacrifice, value". It can also be a Dutch diminutive of WILLEM.
JEROEN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of JEROME.
JESSE   m   English, Dutch, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishay) which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
JO   f & m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of JOAN (1), JOANNA, JOSEPHINE, or other names that begin with Jo. It is primarily masculine in German and Dutch, short for JOHANNES or JOSEF.
JOB   m   Biblical, Dutch
From the Hebrew name אִיּוֹב ('Iyyov) which means "persecuted, hated". In the Book of Job in the Old Testament he is a righteous man who is tested by God, enduring many tragedies and hardships while struggling to remain faithful.
JOCHEM   m   Dutch
Dutch form of JOACHIM.
JODOCUS   m   Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Judoc (see JOYCE).
JOËL   m   French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of JOEL.
JOEP   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of JOZEF.
JOERI   m   Dutch
Dutch form of YURIY.
JOHAN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Scandinavian and Dutch form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
JOHANNES   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Latin form of Ioannes (see JOHN). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
JONAS (2)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical
From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.
JONATHAN   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan),contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
JOOP   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of JOHANNES or JOZEF.
JOORD   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of JORDAN.
JOOS   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of JODOCUS, JUSTUS or JOZEF.
JOOST   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Iudocus (see JOYCE), sometimes used as a diminutive of JUSTUS or JOZEF.
JORDAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of JORDAN.
JORIS   m   Dutch, Frisian
Dutch and Frisian form of GEORGE.
JOS   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of JOZEF.
JOSEPHUS   m   Dutch, History
Latin form of JOSEPH. This form is used by Dutch Catholics. In English, it is used primarily to refer to the 1st-century Jewish historian Titus Flavius Josephus.
JOZEF   m   Slovak, Dutch
Slovak and Dutch form of JOSEPH.
JOZUA   m   Dutch
Dutch form of JOSHUA.
JUDOCUS   m   Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Judoc (see JOYCE).
JURGEN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GEORGE.
JURRIAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GEORGE.
JUSTUS   m   German, Dutch, Late Roman
Latin name which meant "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
KAI (1)   m   Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.
KAREL   m   Dutch, Czech, Slovene
Dutch, Czech and Slovene form of CHARLES.
KASPER   m   Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Polish, Dutch and Scandinavian form of JASPER.
KEES   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of CORNELIUS. A notable bearer was the Dutch painter Kees van Dongen (1877-1968).
KERNEELS   m   Dutch
Dutch (South African) variant of CORNELIUS.
KEVIN   m   English, Irish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the 20th century.
KLAAS   m   Dutch, Low German
Dutch and Low German short form of NICHOLAS.
KOBE (1)   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of JAKOB.
KOBUS   m   Dutch
Diminutive of JACOBUS.
KOEN   m   Dutch
Short form of KOENRAAD.
KOENRAAD   m   Dutch
Dutch form of CONRAD.
KOERT   m   Dutch
Short form of KOENRAAD.
KOOS   m   Dutch
Diminutive of JACOB.
LAMBERT   m   German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements land "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
LAMMERT   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of LAMBERT.
LARS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German
Scandinavian form of LAURENCE (1).
LAU   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of LAURENS.
LAURENS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURIE   f & m   English, Dutch
Diminutive of LAURA or LAURENCE (1).
LENNART   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Low German, Dutch
Swedish and Low German form of LEONARD.
LEO   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEON   m   English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEONARD   m   English, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements levon "lion" and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, though it did not become common there until the 19th century.
LEOPOLD   m   German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).
LEVI   m   Hebrew, English, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. In the New Testament this is another name for the apostle Matthew. As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
LEX   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ALEXANDER.
LIEVEN   m   Flemish
Flemish form of LEOBWIN.
LIEVIN   m   Flemish
Flemish form of LEOBWIN.
LODEWIJK   m   Dutch
Dutch form of LUDWIG.
LOUIS   m   French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LOURENS   m   Frisian, Dutch
Frisian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOWIE   m   Dutch
Diminutive of LODEWIJK.
LUCAS   m   English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).
LUDGER   m   German, Dutch
From the Germanic name Leudagar which was derived from the elements leud "people" and ger "spear". Saint Ludger was an 8th-century Frisian Benedictine bishop who founded a monastery at Munster.
LUDO   m   Dutch
Short form of LUDOVICUS or LUDOLF.
LUDOLF   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hludwolf which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wolf "wolf".
LUUK   m   Dutch
Dutch form of LUKE.
MAARTEN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of MARTIN.
MAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of THOMAS.
MAIKEL   m   Dutch
Dutch variant form of MICHAEL.
MANFRED   m   German, Dutch, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "strength" and frid "peace". This is the name of the main character in Byron's drama 'Manfred' (1817). This name was also borne by Manfred von Richthofen (1892-1918), the German pilot in World War I who was known as the Red Baron.
MANNES   m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of HERMAN.
MARCELLUS   m   Ancient Roman, German, Dutch
Roman family name which was originally a diminutive of MARCUS. This was the name of two popes.
MARCO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Italian form of MARK. During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIJN   m & f   Dutch
Dutch masculine and feminine form of MARINUS.
MARINUS   m   Ancient Roman, Dutch
From the Roman family name Marinus, which derives either from the name MARIUS or from the Latin word marinus "of the sea".
MARIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French
Roman family name which was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MARK   m   English, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical
Form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.... [more]
MARNIX   m   Dutch
From a Dutch surname of unknown meaning.
MARTEN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Martinus (see MARTIN).
MARTIJN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of MARTIN.
MARTINUS   m   Ancient Roman, Dutch
Original Latin form of MARTIN. This is also the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but commonly rendered Maarten or Marten in daily life.
MATTHIAS   m   Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
MATTHIJS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of MATTHIAS.
MAURITS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of MAURICE.
MAX   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).
MAXIMILIAAN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of Maximilianus (see MAXIMILIAN).
MEES   m   Dutch
Diminutive of BARTHOLOMEUS.
MEINDERT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of MEGINHARD.
MEINE   m   Frisian, Dutch, German
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element magan meaning "strength".
MEINO   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Variant of MEINE.
MEINT   m   Dutch
Variant of MEINE.
MELCHIOR   m   Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "king city". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus.
MELLE   m   Dutch
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element mathal meaning "meeting".
MENNO   m   Dutch, German
Diminutive of MEINE.
MICHAËL   m   Dutch, French
Dutch and French form of MICHAEL.
MICHAEL   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHEL   m   French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MICHIEL   m   Dutch
Dutch form of MICHAEL.
MICK   m   English, Dutch
Short form of MICHAEL.
MIES   f & m   Dutch
Dutch diminutive of MARIA or BARTHOLOMEUS.
MILAN   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MINKE   m & f   Frisian, Dutch
Diminutive and feminine form of MEINE.
MOZES   m   Dutch
Dutch form of MOSES.
NICK   m   English, Dutch
Short form of NICHOLAS.
NICO   m   Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of NICHOLAS (or sometimes NICODEMUS).
NICOLAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of NICHOLAS.
NIEK   m   Dutch
Diminutive of NICOLAAS.
NIELS (2)   m   Dutch
Dutch short form of CORNELIUS.
NIKOLAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of NICHOLAS.
NOACH   m   Hebrew, Dutch, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew and Dutch form of NOAH (1).
NORBERT   m   German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord "north" and beraht "bright". This was the name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
OLAF   m   Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
OLIVIER   m   French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OTTO   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
PASCAL   m   French, German, Dutch
From the Late Latin name Paschalis, which meant "relating to Easter" from Latin Pascha "Easter", which was in turn from Hebrew פֶּסַח (pesach) "Passover". Passover is the ancient Hebrew holiday celebrating the liberation from Egypt. Because it coincided closely with the later Christian holiday of Easter, the same Latin word was used for both. The name Pascal can also function as a surname, as in the case of Blaise Pascal, the French philosopher, mathematician and inventor.
PAUL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
PAUWEL   m   Dutch (Archaic)
Dutch (Flemish) form of PAUL.
PEPIJN   m   Dutch
Dutch form of PÉPIN.
PETER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.... [more]
PETRUS   m   Dutch, German, Biblical Latin
Latin form of PETER used in Dutch and German.
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