Spanish Names

Spanish names are used in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries (such as those in South America). See also about Spanish names.
gender
usage
Juan Francisco m Spanish
Combination of Juan 1 and Francisco.
Juanita f Spanish
Diminutive of Juana.
Juanito m Spanish
Diminutive of Juan 1.
Juan José m Spanish
Combination of Juan 1 and José.
Juanma m Spanish
Contraction of Juan Manuel.
Juan Manuel m Spanish
Combination of Juan 1 and Manuel.
Juan Pablo m Spanish
Combination of Juan 1 and Pablo.
Juantxo m Spanish
Diminutive of Juan 1.
Judit f Hungarian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German (Rare)
Form of Judith used in several languages.
Judith f English, Jewish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "Jewish woman", feminine of יְהוּדִי (yehudi), ultimately referring to a person from the tribe of Judah. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.... [more]
Julia f English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name Julius. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594).... [more]
Julián m Spanish
Spanish form of Iulianus (see Julian).
Juliana f Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Iulianus (see Julian). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
Julieta f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Juliet.
Julio m Spanish
Spanish form of Julius.
Julio César m Spanish
Combination of Julio and César, referring to the Roman general Julius Caesar.
Justa f Late Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of Justus. This was the name of a few early saints.
Justina f English, Spanish, Slovene, Lithuanian, Late Roman
From Latin Iustina, the feminine form of Iustinus (see Justin). This name was borne by several early saints and martyrs.
Justino m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Iustinus (see Justin).
Justo m Spanish
Spanish form of Justus.
Kevin m English, Irish, French (Modern), Spanish (Modern), German (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern), Danish (Modern)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín meaning "beloved birth", derived from Old Irish Cóemgein, composed of cóem "dear, beloved, gentle" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the middle of the 20th century, and elsewhere in Europe in the late 20th century.
Kike m Spanish
Diminutive of Enrique.
Kiko m Spanish
Diminutive of Francisco or Enrique.
Kilian m German, Spanish, Irish, French
German and Spanish form of Cillian, as well as an Irish and French variant.
Ladislao m Spanish, Italian (Rare)
Spanish and Italian form of Vladislav.
Lady f Spanish (Latin American)
From the English noble title Lady, derived from Old English hlæfdige, originally meaning "bread kneader". This name grew in popularity in Latin America after the marriage of Diana Spencer, known as Lady Di, to Prince Charles in 1981 and her death in 1997.
Lalo m Spanish
Diminutive of Eduardo.
Lara 1 f Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of Larisa. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel Doctor Zhivago (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965). Between 1965 and 1969 it increased by almost 2,000 percent in the United States, however it is currently much more popular in the United Kingdom, Australia, Spain, Portugual, Italy, and Germany. Another famous fictional bearer is Lara Croft, first appearing in video games in 1996 and movies in 2001.
Laura f English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, French, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
Laurentino m Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of Laurentinus.
Laurita f Spanish
Diminutive of Laura.
Lázaro m Spanish
Spanish form of Lazarus.
Leandro m Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Leander.
Leire f Basque, Spanish
Basque form and Spanish variant of Leyre.
Leocadia f Spanish, Late Roman
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκός (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
Leocadio m Spanish
Masculine form of Leocadia.
León m Spanish
Spanish form of Leon. This is also the name of a city and province in Spain (see León), though the etymology is unrelated.
Leonardo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Leonard. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the Mona Lisa. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
Leoncio m Spanish
Spanish form of Leontios.
Leonel m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Lionel.
Leonor f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Eleanor. It was brought to Spain in the 12th-century by Eleanor of England, who married King Alfonso VIII of Castile.
Leopoldo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Leopold.
Leticia f Spanish
Spanish form of Letitia.
Leyre f Spanish
From the name of a mountain in Navarre in northern Spain, the site of the old monastery of San Salvador of Leyre. It is from Basque Leire, possibly derived from Latin legionarius meaning "pertaining to a legion".
Liberato m Italian, Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Rare)
Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese form of Liberatus.
Lidia f Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Georgian
Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian and Georgian form of Lydia.
Ligia f Romanian, Spanish
Romanian and Spanish form of Ligeia.
Lilia f Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian
Spanish and Italian form of Lily, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Лилия or Ukrainian Лілія (see Liliya).
Lino 1 m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Galician
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Galician form of Linus.
Lisandro m Spanish
Spanish form of Lysander.
Loida f Spanish
Spanish form of Lois 1.
Lola f Spanish, English, French
Spanish diminutive of Dolores. A famous bearer was Lola Montez (1821-1861; birth name Eliza Gilbert), an Irish-born dancer, actress and courtesan.
Lolita f Spanish
Diminutive of Lola. This is the name of a 1955 novel by Vladimir Nabokov.
Lope m Spanish
Spanish form of Lupus (see Loup).
Lorena 1 f Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian
Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Romanian form of Lorraine.
Lorenza f Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish feminine form of Laurentius (see Laurence 1).
Lorenzo m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Laurentius (see Laurence 1). Lorenzo de' Medici (1449-1492), known as the Magnificent, was a ruler of Florence during the Renaissance. He was also a great patron of the arts who employed Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli and other famous artists.
Loreto f & m Spanish, Italian
From the name of a town in Italy, originally called Lauretum in Latin, meaning "laurel grove". Supposedly in the 13th century the house of the Virgin Mary was miraculously carried by angels from Nazareth to the town. In Spain it is a feminine name, from the Marian title Nuestra Señora de Loreto, while in Italy it is mostly masculine.
Lourdes f Spanish
From the name of a French town. It became a popular center of pilgrimage after a young girl from the town had visions of the Virgin Mary in a nearby grotto.
Lucas m English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Latin form of Greek Λουκᾶς (see Luke), as well as the form used in several other languages.... [more]
Lucero f & m Spanish (Mexican), Spanish (Latin American)
Means "light source, bright star, morning star" in Spanish, a derivative of luz "light". Occasionally it is used as a diminutive of the name Luz. It is most common in Mexico and Colombia.
Lucho m Spanish
Diminutive of Luis.
Lucía f Spanish
Spanish form of Lucia. This is the most popular name for girls in Spain beginning in 2003.
Luciano m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Lucianus.
Lucila f Spanish
Spanish form of Lucilla.
Lucio m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Lucius.
Lucrecia f Spanish
Spanish form of Lucretia.
Luis m Spanish
Spanish form of Louis.
Luisa f Spanish, Italian
Feminine form of Luis.
Luis Ángel m Spanish
Combination of Luis and Ángel.
Luisina f Spanish
Diminutive of Luisa.
Luisita f Spanish
Diminutive of Luisa.
Luisito m Spanish
Diminutive of Luis.
Luna f Roman Mythology, Spanish, Italian, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Lupe f & m Spanish
Short form of Guadalupe.
Lupita f Spanish
Diminutive of Guadalupe.
Luz f Spanish
Means "light" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Luz, meaning "Our Lady of Light".
Macarena f Spanish
From the name of a barrio (district) in Seville, which got its name from a temple that may have been named for a person named Macarius (see Macario). The Virgin of Macarena, that is Mary, is widely venerated in Seville.
Macaria f Spanish
Feminine form of Macario.
Macario m Spanish
Spanish form of the Latin name Macarius, derived from the Greek name Μακάριος (Makarios), which was in turn derived from Greek μάκαρ (makar) meaning "blessed, happy". This was the name of several early saints.
Mafalda f Portuguese, Italian, Spanish
Originally a medieval Portuguese form of Matilda. This name was borne by the wife of Afonso, the first king of Portugal. In modern times it was the name of the titular character in a popular Argentine comic strip (published from 1964 to 1973) by Quino.
Magaly f Spanish (Latin American)
Variant of Magali, predominantly found in Spanish-speaking countries.
Maikel m Dutch (Modern), Spanish (Modern)
Dutch and Spanish variant of Michael (based on the English pronunciation).
Maite 1 f Spanish
Combination of María and Teresa.
Malena f Swedish, Spanish
Swedish and Spanish short form of Magdalena.
Manola f Spanish
Spanish feminine diminutive of Manuel.
Manolo m Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Manuel.
Manu 2 m & f French, Spanish, German, Finnish
Short form of Manuel or Emmanuel (and also of Manuela in Germany).
Manuel m Spanish, Portuguese, German, Italian, French, Romanian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Emmanuel. In the spelling Μανουήλ (Manouel) it was also used in the Byzantine Empire, notably by two emperors. It is possible this form of the name was transmitted to Spain and Portugal from Byzantium, since there were connections between the royal families (king Ferdinand III of Castile married Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, who had Byzantine roots, and had a son named Manuel). The name has been used in Iberia since at least the 13th century and was borne by two kings of Portugal.
Manuelita f Spanish
Diminutive of Manuela.
Mar f Spanish, Catalan
Means "sea" in Spanish and Catalan. It is from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Mar.
Mara 1 f Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "bitter" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is a name that Naomi calls herself after the death of her husband and sons (see Ruth 1:20).
Marcelina f Polish, Spanish
Polish and Spanish feminine form of Marcellinus.
Marcelino m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Marcellinus.
Marcelo m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Marcellus.
Marcia f English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Marcius. It was borne by a few very minor saints. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
Marcial m Spanish
Spanish form of Martialis (see Martial).
Marciana f Ancient Roman, Spanish, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Feminine form of Marcianus. This was the name of a young woman martyred in North Africa during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century.
Marciano m Portuguese, Spanish, Italian (Rare)
Portuguese, Spanish and Italian form of Marcianus.
Marcio m Spanish
Spanish form of Marcius.
Marco m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Italian form of Marcus (see Mark). During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
Marcos m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Marcus (see Mark).
Margarita f Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Greek, Albanian, Late Roman
Latinate form of Margaret. This is also the Spanish word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
María f & m Spanish, Galician, Icelandic
Spanish, Galician and Icelandic form of Maria.... [more]
María Ángeles f Spanish
Combination of María and Ángeles.
María Belén f Spanish
Combination of María and Belén.
María Carmen f Spanish
Combination of María and Carmen. This was the most popular name for girls in Spain from the 1940s to the 1970s.
María Cristina f Spanish
Combination of María and Cristina.
María de Jesús f Spanish
Means "Mary (the mother) of Jesus" in Spanish, a compound of María and Jesús.
María del Carmen f Spanish
Means "María of Carmen" in Spanish.
María de los Ángeles f Spanish
Means "Mary of the angels" in Spanish, a compound of María and Ángeles.
María Dolores f Spanish
Combination of María and Dolores.
María Fernanda f Spanish
Combination of María and Fernanda.
María Isabel f Spanish
Combination of María and Isabel.
María Jesús f Spanish
Combination of María and Jesús.
María José f Spanish
Combination of María and José, the names of the parents of Jesus.
María Josefa f Spanish
Combination of María and Josefa.
María Luisa f Spanish
Combination of María and Luisa.
María Manuela f Spanish
Combination of María and Manuela.
Mariana f Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Roman feminine form of Marianus. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of Maria and Ana. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of Mariamne.
Marianela f Spanish
Combination of María and Estela.
Marianita f Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Mariana.
Mariano m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Marianus. It is also used as a masculine form of Maria.
María Pilar f Spanish
Combination of María and Pilar.
María Teresa f Spanish
Combination of María and Teresa.
Maribel f Spanish
Combination of María and Isabel.
Maricel f Spanish
Combination of María and Celia or Cecilia. It is especially popular in the Philippines.
Maricela f Spanish
Combination of María and Celia.
Maricruz f Spanish
Combination of María and Cruz.
Mariela f Spanish, Bulgarian
Spanish and Bulgarian diminutive of Maria.
Marina f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Marinus. This name was borne by a few early saints. This is also the name by which Saint Margaret of Antioch is known in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Marino m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Marinus.
Mario m Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian
Italian and Spanish form of Marius. Famous bearers include American racecar driver Mario Andretti (1940-) and Canadian hockey player Mario Lemieux (1965-). It is also borne by a Nintendo video game character, a mustached Italian plumber, who debuted as the playable hero of Donkey Kong in 1981. He was reportedly named after Mario Segale (1934-2018), an American businessman who rented a warehouse to Nintendo.
Marisa f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of Maria and Luisa.
Marisela f Spanish
Elaborated form of Marisa.
Marisol f Spanish
Combination of María and Sol 1 or Soledad. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".
Maristela f Portuguese, Spanish (Rare)
From the title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea" in Latin. It can also be a combination of Maria and Estela.
Maritza f Spanish (Latin American)
Diminutive of Maria used particularly in Latin America.
Martín m Spanish
Spanish form of Martinus (see Martin).
Martina f German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Martinus (see Martin). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
Martirio f Spanish (Rare)
Means "martyrdom" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Martirio, the patron saint of the Spanish town of Ugíjar.
Martita f Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Marta.
Mateo m Spanish, Croatian
Spanish form of Matthew. This form is also sometimes used in Croatia, from the Italian form Matteo.
Matías m Spanish
Spanish form of Matthias.
Matilde f Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Matilda.
Mauricio m Spanish
Spanish form of Mauritius (see Maurice).
Mauro m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Maurus.
Maxi m & f Spanish, German
Spanish short form of Maximiliano (masculine) or German short form of Maximiliane (feminine) or Maximilian (masculine).
Máxima f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Maximus.
Maximiano m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Maximianus.
Maximiliano m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Maximilianus (see Maximilian).
Maximino m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Maximinus.
Máximo m Spanish
Spanish form of Maximus.
Mayte f Spanish
Variant of Maite 1.
Melania f Italian, Spanish, Polish, Romanian, Late Roman
Italian, Spanish, Polish and Romanian form of Melanie.
Melchor m Spanish
Spanish form of Melchior.
Melisa f Spanish, Bosnian, Turkish
Spanish, Bosnian and Turkish form of Melissa.
Mercedes f Spanish
Means "mercies" (that is, the plural of mercy), from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary, María de las Mercedes, meaning "Mary of Mercies". It is ultimately from the Latin word merces meaning "wages, reward", which in Vulgar Latin acquired the meaning "favour, pity".
Merche f Spanish
Diminutive of Mercedes.
Mía f Spanish
Spanish form of Mia, also coinciding with the Spanish word mía meaning "mine".
Miguel m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Michael. A notable bearer of this name was Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1547-1616), the Spanish novelist and poet who wrote Don Quixote.
Miguel Ángel m Spanish
Spanish cognate of Michelangelo.
Milagros f Spanish
Means "miracles" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de los Milagros, which means "Our Lady of Miracles".
Minerva f Roman Mythology, English, Spanish
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
Mireia f Catalan, Spanish
Catalan form of Mirèio (see Mireille).
Mireya f Spanish
Variant of Mireia.
Míriam f Spanish
Spanish form of Miriam.
Mirta f Spanish, Italian, Croatian
Spanish, Italian and Croatian cognate of Myrtle.
Modesta f Spanish, Late Roman
Feminine form of Modestus.
Modesto m Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Modestus.
Moisés m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Moses.
Moncho m Spanish
Diminutive of Ramón.
Mónica f Spanish, Portuguese (European)
Spanish and European Portuguese form of Monica.
Morena f Italian, Spanish
Feminine form of Moreno.
Moreno m Italian, Spanish
Derived from Italian moro or Spanish moreno meaning "dark-skinned".
Nacho m Spanish
Diminutive of Ignacio.
Nacio m Spanish (Rare)
Short form of Ignacio.
Nadia 1 f French, Italian, Spanish, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian
Variant of Nadya 1 used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-).
Narciso m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Narcissus. This is also the word for the narcissus flower in those languages.
Natalio m Spanish
Masculine form of Natalia.
Natanael m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Nathanael.
Natividad f Spanish
Means "nativity" in Spanish.
Nayara f Spanish
Spanish form of Naiara.
Nayeli f Indigenous American, Zapotec (Hispanicized), Spanish (Mexican)
Possibly from Zapotec nadxiie lii meaning "I love you" or nayele' meaning "open".
Nazaret f & m Spanish, Armenian
From Nazareth, the town in Galilee where Jesus lived. This name is primarily feminine in Spanish and primarily masculine in Armenian.
Nazario m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Nazarius.
Neizan m Spanish (Modern)
Spanish form of Nathan, reflecting the English pronunciation.
Nélida f Literature, Spanish
Created by French author Marie d'Agoult for her semi-autobiographical novel Nélida (1846), written under the name Daniel Stern. It was probably an anagram of her pen name Daniel.
Nelson m English, Spanish
From an English surname meaning "son of Neil". It was originally given in honour of the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). His most famous battle was the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he destroyed a combined French and Spanish fleet, but was himself killed. Another notable bearer was the South African statesman Nelson Mandela (1918-2013). Mandela's birth name was Rolihlahla; as a child he was given the English name Nelson by a teacher.
Nerea f Basque, Spanish
Possibly from Basque nere, a dialectal variant of nire meaning "mine". Alternatively, it could be a feminine form of Nereus. This name arose in Basque-speaking regions of Spain in the first half of the 20th century, though it is now popular throughout the country.
Nereida f Spanish
Derived from Greek Νηρηΐδες (Nereides) meaning "nymphs, sea sprites", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god Nereus, who supposedly fathered them.
Nereo m Italian, Spanish (Latin American)
Italian and Spanish form of Nereus.
Néstor m Spanish
Spanish form of Nestor.
Nicanor m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Spanish
From the Greek name Νικάνωρ (Nikanor), which was derived from νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". This name was borne by several notable officers from ancient Macedon.
Nico m Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of Nicholas (or sometimes Nicodemus).
Nicodemo m Italian, Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Nicodemus.
Nicol 2 f Spanish (Latin American), Czech
Spanish and Czech form of Nicole.
Nicolás m Spanish
Spanish form of Nicholas.
Nicolasa f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Nicholas.
Nidia f Spanish
Variant of Nydia.
Nieves f Spanish
Means "snows" in Spanish, derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".
Nilda f Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of Brunilda.
Nilo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Neilos (and also of the Nile River).
Ninfa f Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of Nympha.
Noa 1 f Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Biblical
Modern Hebrew form of Noah 2, the daughter of Zelophehad in the Bible. It is also the form used in several other languages, as well as the spelling used in some English versions of the Old Testament.
Noelia f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Noël.
Noemí f Spanish
Spanish form of Naomi 1.
Nohemi f Spanish
Spanish variant form of Naomi 1.
Nora 1 f English, Irish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish
Short form of Honora or Eleanor. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play A Doll's House (1879).
Norberto m Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Norbert.
Nuria f Spanish
Spanish form of Núria.
Nydia f English (Rare), Spanish, Literature
Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel The Last Days of Pompeii (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".
Obdulia f Spanish
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a saint from Toledo, Spain. The details of her life are unknown.
Octavia f English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Octavius. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
Octavio m Spanish
Spanish form of Octavius.
Odalis f & m Spanish (Latin American)
Possibly an elaboration of Odilia used in Latin America. In most countries it is a feminine name, but in the Dominican Republic it is commonly masculine.
Ofelia f Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of Ophelia.
Olalla f Galician, Spanish
Galician variant of Eulalia.
Olaya f Asturian, Spanish
Asturian form of Eulalia.
Olegario m Spanish
Spanish form of a Germanic name, possibly Aldegar, derived from the elements ald "old" and ger "spear". This was the name of a 12th-century saint, a bishop of Barcelona.
Olga f Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of the Old Norse name Helga. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, the ruler of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Like her husband she was probably a Varangian, who were Norse people who settled in eastern Europe beginning in the 9th century. Following Igor's death she ruled as regent for her son Svyatoslav for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity, though this goal was only achieved by her grandson Vladimir.
Oliva f Late Roman, Spanish
Late Latin name meaning "olive". This was the name of a 2nd-century saint from Brescia.
Olivia f English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time that may have been based on Oliva or Oliver, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
Olvido f Spanish
Means "oblivion, forgetting" in Spanish, taken from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora del Olvido, Triunfo y Misericordias meaning "Our Lady of Oblivion, Triumph and Mercies". It commemorates an 1831 vision of Mary by the Spanish nun Sor Patrocinio.
Omar 1 m Arabic, Malay, English, Spanish, Italian
Alternate transcription of Arabic عمر (see Umar). This is the usual English spelling of the 12th-century poet Umar Khayyam's name. In his honour it has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world, notably for the American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
Onofre m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Onuphrius.
Orfeo m Italian, Spanish (Rare)
Italian and Spanish form of Orpheus.
Oriana f Italian, Spanish
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.
Orlando m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian form of Roland, as used in the epic poems Orlando Innamorato (1483) by Matteo Maria Boiardo and Orlando Furioso (1532) by Ludovico Ariosto. A character in Shakespeare's play As You like It (1599) also bears this name, as does a city in Florida.
Óscar m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Oscar.
Osvaldo m Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Oswald.
Otilia f Romanian, Spanish
Romanian and Spanish form of Odilia.
Ovidia f Ancient Roman, Spanish (Rare), Romanian (Rare)
Feminine form of Ovidius (see Ovid).
Ovidio m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Ovidius (see Ovid).
Pablo m Spanish
Spanish form of Paulus (see Paul). Spanish painter and sculptor Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) was a famous bearer of this name.
Paca f Spanish
Diminutive of Francisca.
Pacífica f Spanish (Rare)
Spanish feminine form of the Late Latin name Pacificus meaning "peacemaker".
Paco m Spanish
Diminutive of Francisco.
Paloma f Spanish
Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.
Pancho m Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Francisco. This name was borne by Pancho Villa (1878-1923), a Mexican bandit and revolutionary.
Pánfilo m Spanish
Spanish form of Pamphilos.
Paquita f Spanish
Diminutive of Francisca.
Paquito m Spanish
Diminutive of Francisco.
Pascual m Spanish
Spanish form of Pascal.
Pascuala f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Pascal.
Pastor m Spanish, Late Roman
From a Late Latin name meaning "shepherd". This was the name of at least three saints.
Pastora f Spanish
Feminine form of Pastor.
Patricia f English, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Feminine form of Patricius (see Patrick). In medieval England this spelling appears in Latin documents, but this form was probably not used as the actual name until the 18th century, in Scotland.
Patricio m Spanish
Spanish form of Patricius (see Patrick).
Patrocinia f Spanish (Latin American)
Strictly feminine variant of Patrocinio.
Patrocinio f & m Spanish
Means "patronage, sponsorship" in Spanish, taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, La Virgen del Patrocinio, meaning "The Virgin of Patronage".
Paula f German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see Paul). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
Paulino m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of the Roman family name Paulinus, which was itself derived from Paulus (see Paul). Saint Paulinus of Nola was a 5th-century nobleman from Gaul who gave up his wealthy lifestyle and became bishop of Nola. He was also noted for his poetry. Another saint by this name was a 7th-century missionary to England who became the first bishop of York.
Paz 1 f Spanish
Means "peace" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Paz, meaning "Our Lady of Peace".
Pedro m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Peter. This was the name of the only two emperors of Brazil, reigning between 1822 and 1889.
Pelayo m Spanish
Spanish form of Pelagius. This was the name of the founder of the kingdom of Asturias in the 8th century.
Pepe m Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Joseph.
Pepita f Spanish
Spanish feminine diminutive of Joseph.
Pepito m Spanish
Spanish diminutive of Joseph.
Perla f Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish cognate of Pearl.
Perlita f Spanish
Diminutive of Perla.
Perpetua f Spanish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin perpetuus meaning "continuous". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred with another woman named Felicity.
Petra f German, Dutch, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Feminine form of Peter. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
Petrona f Spanish
Possibly a feminine form of Petronius.
Petronila f Spanish
Spanish form of Petronilla.
Pía f Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Pius.
Piedad f Spanish
Means "mercy, piety" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin pietas.
Pilar f Spanish
Means "pillar" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Pilar, meaning "Mary of the Pillar". According to legend, when Saint James the Greater was in Saragossa in Spain, the Virgin Mary appeared on a pillar.
Pili 1 f Spanish
Diminutive of Pilar.
Pío m Spanish
Spanish form of Pius.