Names Categorized "tv show titles"

This is a list of names in which the categories include tv show titles.
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ABBYfEnglish
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ALICEfEnglish, French, Portuguese, Italian
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
ANGELm & fEnglish, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
ANGIEfEnglish
Diminutive of ANGELA.
ARCHERmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "bowman, archer", of Old French origin.
ARSENIOmSpanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of ARSENIOS.
ARTHURmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
BARRYmIrish, English
Anglicized form of BAIRRE. It is also sometimes used as an Anglicized form of BERACH.
BETTEfEnglish
Diminutive of ELIZABETH. A famous bearer was American actress Bette Davis (1908-1989).
BILLYmEnglish
Diminutive of BILL. A notable bearer was the American outlaw Billy the Kid (1859-1881), whose real name was William H. Bonney.
BLOSSOMfEnglish
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
CHANCEmEnglish
Originally a diminutive of CHAUNCEY. It is now usually given in reference to the English word chance meaning "luck, fortune" (ultimately derived from Latin cadens "falling").
CHASEmEnglish
From a surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.
CHEYENNEf & mEnglish
Derived from the Dakota word shahiyena meaning "red speakers". This is the name of a Native American people of the Great Plains. The name was supposedly given to the Cheyenne by the Dakota because their language was unrelated to their own. As a given name, it has been in use since the 1950s.
CHUCKmEnglish
Diminutive of CHARLES. It originated in America in the early 20th century. Two famous bearers of this name were pilot Chuck Yeager (1923-), the first man to travel faster than the speed of sound, and the musician Chuck Berry (1926-2017), one of the pioneers of rock music.
CLARENCEmEnglish
From the Latin title Clarensis which belonged to members of the British royal family. The title ultimately derives from the name of the town of Clare in Suffolk. As a given name it has been in use since the 19th century.
CYBILLfEnglish (Rare)
Variant of SIBYL. This name was borne by actress Cybill Shepherd (1950-), who was named after her grandfather Cy and her father Bill.
DALLASm & fEnglish
From a surname which was originally taken from a Scottish place name meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864).
DAMONmGreek Mythology, English
Derived from Greek δαμαζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". According to Greek legend, Damon and Pythias were friends who lived on Syracuse in the 4th century BC. When Pythias was sentenced to death, he was allowed to temporarily go free on the condition that Damon take his place in prison. Pythias returned just before Damon was to be executed in his place, and the king was so impressed with their loyalty to one another that he pardoned Pythias. As an English given name, it has only been regularly used since the 20th century.
DANNYmEnglish
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DARIAfItalian, Polish, Romanian, English, Croatian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of DARIUS. Saint Daria was a 3rd-century Greek woman who was martyred with her husband Chrysanthus under the Roman emperor Numerian. It has never been a particularly common English given name.
DELTAfEnglish
From the name of the fourth letter in the Greek alphabet, Δ. It is also the name for an island formed at the mouth of a river.
DEXTERmEnglish
From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".
DOUGmEnglish
Short form of DOUGLAS.
DUDLEYmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
EDmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
ELLEN (1)fEnglish
Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 17th century, when Helen became more common.
ENOSmBiblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of ENOSH used in many versions of the Old Testament.
EVEfEnglish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.... [more]
FELICITYfEnglish
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series 'Felicity'.
FLOfEnglish
Short form of FLORENCE or FLORA.
FREDDIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
GEORGEmEnglish, Romanian
From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.... [more]
GLORIAfEnglish, Spanish, Italian, German
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.... [more]
GLYNISfWelsh
Either a variant of GLENYS or an elaboration of the Welsh word glyn meaning "valley".
GRADYmIrish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Grádaigh". The name Grádaigh means "noble" in Gaelic.
HAGEN (1)mGerman, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic element hagan meaning "enclosure". In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' he is the half-brother of Günther. He killed the hero Siegfried by luring him onto a hunting expedition and then stabbing him with a javelin in his one vulnerable spot.
HANKmEnglish
Originally a short form of Hankin which was a medieval diminutive of JOHN. Since the 17th century in the United States this name has also been used as a diminutive of HENRY, probably under the influence of the Dutch diminutive HENK. A famous bearer is the American former baseball player Hank Aaron (1934-).
HANNIBALmPhoenician (Latinized), History
Means "grace of Ba'al" from Phoenician hann "grace" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hannibal was the Carthaginian general who threatened Rome during the Second Punic War in the 3rd century BC.
HAPPYf & mEnglish (Rare)
From the English word happy.
HAVENf & mEnglish
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HUNTERm & fEnglish
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
JEMmEnglish
Diminutive of JEREMY (and formerly of JAMES).
JENNYfEnglish, Swedish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Originally a medieval English diminutive of JANE. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of JENNIFER.
JEREMIAHmEnglish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִרְמְיָהוּ (Yirmiyahu) meaning "YAHWEH will exalt", from the roots רוּם (rum) meaning "to exalt" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This is the name of one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations (supposedly). He lived to see the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in the 6th century BC.... [more]
JERICHOmEnglish (Modern)
From the name of a city in Israel which is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain, but it may be related to the Hebrew word יָרֵחַ (yareach) meaning "moon", or otherwise to the Hebrew word רֵיחַ (reyach) meaning "fragrant".
JESSEmEnglish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai) which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
JESSIE (1)fScottish, English
Originally a Scottish diminutive of JEAN (2). In modern times it is also used as a diminutive of JESSICA.
JOEYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of JOSEPH. It is occasionally used as a feminine diminutive of JOSEPHINE or JOHANNA.
JONAS (2)mSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical
From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.
JULIAfEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).... [more]
JULIEfFrench, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JUSTICEm & fEnglish
From an occupational surname which meant "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
KAREN (1)fDanish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, English
Danish short form of KATHERINE. It became common in the English-speaking world after the 1930s.
KATHYfEnglish
Diminutive of KATHERINE.
KENDRAfEnglish
Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK.
KIRSTIEfScottish
Diminutive of KIRSTIN.
LENNYmEnglish
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LOUIEmEnglish
Diminutive of LOUIS.
LOVE (2)fEnglish
Simply from the English word love, derived from Old English lufu.
MAGGIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARTINmEnglish, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MAUDEfEnglish
Variant of MAUD.
MELBAfEnglish
From the surname of the Australian opera singer Nellie Melba (1861-1931). This was a stage name that she got from the name of the city Melbourne, where she was born.
MICKEYm & fEnglish
Diminutive or feminine form of MICHAEL. This was the name that Walt Disney gave to Ub Iwerks' cartoon character Mickey Mouse, who was originally named Mortimer Mouse. Another famous bearer was the American baseball player Mickey Mantle (1931-1995).
MONTYmEnglish
Variant of MONTE.
NANA (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and/or (na), a phonetic character. The characters can be in either order or the same character can be duplicated, as indicated by the symbol . Other kanji with the same pronunciations can also be used to form this name.
NANCYfEnglish
Previously a medieval diminutive of ANNIS, though since the 18th century it has been a diminutive of ANN. It is now usually regarded as an independent name. During the 20th century it became very popular in the United States. A city in the Lorraine region of France bears this name, though it derives from a different source.
NIKITA (1)mRussian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Russian form of NIKETAS. This form is also used in Ukrainian and Belarusian alongside the more traditional forms Mykyta and Mikita.
NIKITA (2)fIndian, Marathi, Hindi
Derived from Sanskrit निकेत (niketa) meaning "house, habitation".
OLIVIAfEnglish, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
PARIS (2)fVarious
From the name of the capital city of France, which got its name from the ancient Celtic tribe known as the Parisii.
PEARLfEnglish
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PEARLIEfEnglish
Diminutive of PEARL.
PHYLLISfGreek Mythology, English, German
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
RAFFERTYmEnglish
From an Irish surname which was an Anglicized form of Ó Rabhartaigh meaning "descendant of Rabhartach". The given name Rabhartach means "flood tide".
RAMONAfSpanish, Romanian, English
Feminine form of RAMÓN. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Helen Hunt Jackson's novel 'Ramona' (1884), as well as several subsequent movies based on the book.
RAVENf & mEnglish
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
REBAfEnglish
Short form of REBECCA.
REBECAfSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of REBECCA.
RHODAfBiblical, English
Derived from Greek ‘ροδον (rhodon) meaning "rose". In the New Testament this name was borne by a maid in the house of Mary the mother of John Mark. As an English given name, Rhoda came into use in the 17th century.
ROBmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT.
ROCmCatalan
Catalan form of ROCCO.
RODNEYmEnglish
From a surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is a Germanic given name meaning "fame"). It was first used as a given name in honour of the British admiral Lord Rodney (1719-1792).
ROMEOmItalian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Romaeus meaning "a pilgrim to Rome". Romeo is best known as the lover of Juliet in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
ROSWELLmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "horse spring".
ROXIEfEnglish
Diminutive of ROXANA.
RYANmIrish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
SABLEfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.
SANFORDmEnglish
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "sand ford" in Old English.
SAVANNAHfEnglish
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie 'Savannah Smiles' (1982).
SCARLETTfEnglish
From a surname which denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SHIRLEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel 'Shirley' (1849). The child actress Shirley Temple (1928-2014) helped to popularize this name.
SIERRAfEnglish (Modern)
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.
SMITHmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
SPARTACUSmHistory
Means "from the city of Sparta" in Latin. Spartacus was the name of a Thracian-born Roman slave who led a slave revolt in Italy in the 1st century BC. He was eventually killed in battle and many of his followers were crucified.
STARfEnglish
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.
TABITHAfEnglish, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show 'Bewitched', in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.
TAINAfFinnish
Finnish short form of TATIANA.
TOM (1)mEnglish, Dutch, German, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Short form of THOMAS. Tom Sawyer was the main character in several of Mark Twain's novels, first appearing in 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876). Other famous bearers include American actors Tom Hanks (1956-) and Tom Cruise (1962-).
TRINITYfEnglish
From the English word Trinity, given in honour of the Christian belief that God has one essence, but three distinct expressions of being: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It has only been in use as a given name since the 20th century.
VALENTINE (1)mEnglish
From the Roman cognomen Valentinus which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.
VALERIAfItalian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
WHITNEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WILFREDmEnglish
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace". Saint Wilfrid was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
WILLYm & fEnglish, German, Dutch
Diminutive of WILLIAM, WILHELM or WILLEM. It is both masculine and feminine in Dutch.
WOLFmGerman, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Short form of WOLFGANG, WOLFRAM or other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf". It can also be simply from the German or English word.